College Catalog (2018-19)

Eighty-Second Edition

NOTE: This online catalog works best on a desktop computer with an updated web browser.

Kilgore College
1100 Broadway
Kilgore, TX 75662-3204
(903) 984-8531
www.kilgore.edu


A COMPREHENSIVE PUBLIC COMMUNITY/JUNIOR COLLEGE

Composed of the following independent school districts:

  • Gladewater
  • Kilgore
  • Leverett's Chapel
  • Overton
  • Sabine
  • West Rusk County Consolidated
  • White Oak

Information in this catalog is current as of March 2018 and all information is subject to change without notice.


Table of Contents:


Courses:


Official Kilgore College Academic Calendar 2018-2019

Click to view the KC Academic Calendar for 2018-19 (pdf)


About Kilgore College:

Kilgore College Board of Trustees:

  • Larry A. Woodfin, President, Gladewater
  • Jon Rowe, Gladewater
  • J. Karol Pruett, Secretary, Kilgore
  • Joe Carrington, White Oak
  • Scott Andrews, West Rusk
  • Lon Ford, Kilgore
  • Janice Bagley, Overton
  • Brian Nutt, Vice President, Kilgore
  • Cecelia Sanders, West Rusk
  • More Info

Kilgore College Executive Leadership Team:

  • Dr. Brenda S. Kays, President
  • Fred Gore, Vice President of Administrative Services and Chief Financial Officer
  • Leah Gorman, Director of Alumni, Scholarship & Foundation Relations
  • Dr. Michael W. Jenkins, Vice President of Student Development and Chief Student Affairs Officer
  • Tony D. Johnson, Director of Human Resources
  • Nancy Law, Assistant to the President
  • Dr. Staci J. Martin, Vice President of Institutional Planning
  • Dr. Michael H. Turpin, Vice President of Instruction and Chief Academic Officer

Regional Accreditation:

Kilgore College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award the associate degree. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Kilgore College. 

Special Program Accreditation and Approval:

  • Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 
  • 1361 Park St., Clearwater, FL 33756, (727) 210-2350, www.caahep.org 
  • Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education 
  • Inter-Industry Conference on Auto Collision Repair (I-Car) 
  • National Academy of Early Childhood Programs 
  • National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation 
  • Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing 
  • 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta GA 30326, 404.975-5000 
  • Texas Board of Nursing 
  • Texas Commission on Law Enforcement 
  • Texas Commission on Fire Protection 
  • Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services, Nurse Aide Training Program (P.O. Box 149030, Mail Code E-420, Austin, TX 78714, 512-452-3934)
  • Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations 
  • Texas Department of State Health Services 
  • Texas Education Agency Memberships

Memberships:

  • Achieving the Dream
  • Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA)
  • American Criminal Justice Association
  • American Library Association
  • American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT)
  • American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE)
  • American Welding Society (AWS)
  • Association for Crime Scene Reconstruction
  • Association of Collegiate Educators in Radiologic Technology (ACERT)
  • Association of Educators in Imaging and Radiologic Sciences (AEIRS)
  • Community College Association of Texas Trustees
  • Council for Advancement and Support of Education
  • Council for Opportunity in Education
  • East Texas Genealogical Society
  • East Texas Historical Society
  • Government Finance Officers Association
  • Grant Professionals Association
  • International Association for Identification
  • International Association of Bloodstain Pattern Analysts
  • International Crime Scene Investigator’s Association
  • NAFSA: Association of International Educators
  • National Association of Basketball Coaches
  • National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE)
  • National Athletic Training Association
  • National Business Education Association (NBEA)
  • National College Testing Association
  • National Fast Pitch Coaches Association
  • National Junior College Athletic Association
  • National Strength and Conditioning Association
  • North American Process Technology Association (NAPTA)
  • Petroleum History Institute
  • Piney Woods Counseling Association
  • State Firefighters’ and Fire Marshals’ Association of Texas
  • Region XIV Athletic Conference
  • Society for Human Resource Management
  • Southwest Association of College and University Housing Officers
  • Southwest Junior College Football Conference
  • Texas Association of School Boards
  • Texas Association of School Boards Human Resources Services
  • The College Board
  • Texas Association for Institutional Research
  • Texas Association of Basketball Coaches
  • Texas Association of Black Personnel in Higher Education
  • Texas Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers
  • Texas Association of Collegiate Testing Personnel
  • Texas Association of Community Colleges (TACC)
  • Texas Association of Community College Student Affairs Administrators
  • Texas Association of Financial Aid Administrators
  • Texas Association of Vocational Nurse Educators (TAVNE)
  • Texas Business & Technology Educators Association (TBTEA)
  • Texas Commission on Fire Protection
  • Texas Community College Teachers Association (TCCTA)
  • Texas Completes
  • Texas Council of Academic Libraries
  • Texas District & County Attorneys’ Association
  • Texas Division International Association for Identification
  • Texas Library Association
  • Texas Police Association
  • Texas State Athletic Trainer Association
  • Women’s Basketball College Association

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History:

Kilgore College is a publicly supported, two-year, comprehensive community college offering postsecondary educational opportunities.

In 1935 Kilgore College was the idea of Mr. W. L. Dodson and the community of Kilgore, Texas. We have come a long way since the early part of the century and today we are recognized as one of the finest two-year institutions in the South. The main campus is located in Gregg County and continues to serve many students from surrounding counties. In the beginning, the curriculum was designed to serve university-bound students; but today, the college also offers education and training in wide variety of workforce programs. We are also the home of an excellent athletic program, the world famous Kilgore College Rangerettes, the National Championship Lady Rangers Basketball Team, and The East Texas Oil Museum. 


Mission Statement:

Kilgore College provides a learner-centered environment that focuses on student access, success and completion via collaborative partnerships.

  • Kilgore College promotes access through its open-door admission, distance learning opportunities, dual credit courses, developmental education, continuing education, and comprehensive financial aid programs.
  • Kilgore College promotes success through high quality innovative instruction and holistic student support services and activities.
  • Kilgore College promotes completion by providing a foundation for students to flourish either through university transfer or entry into the workforce as highly skilled and technologically advanced employees.
  • Kilgore College leads and promotes partnerships through outreach to area schools and universities, small business/entrepreneurial expansion, adult education and literacy, responsiveness to economic development needs, and promotion of social and cultural advancement.

The mission statement of Kilgore College is consistent with the Texas Education Code 130.0011, which states that the mission of public junior colleges shall be two-year institutions primarily serving their local taxing districts and service areas in Texas and offering vocational, technical, and academic courses for certification or associate degrees, as well as continuing education, remedial and compensatory education consistent with open-admissions policies

Approved by KC Board of Trustees:
December 12, 2016
December 11, 2017


Vision Statement:

We commit to be the higher education institution of choice in Northeast Texas.


Civility Statement:

Students are expected to assist in maintaining an environment that is conducive to learning. Inappropriate or distractive behavior is prohibited in order to assure that everyone has an opportunity to gain from time spent in the course. Should a disruptive incident occur, the faculty member in charge may remove the student. Students have the right to appeal.


Nondiscrimination Statement:

Kilgore College seeks to provide equal educational and employment opportunities without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, disability, marital status, veteran status or genetic information. Residence halls are specifically designated, however, for male or female occupancy. Kilgore College is striving to provide facilities that are barrier-free for students who have physical challenges.


Campus Locations:

Kilgore College's main campus is at 1100 Broadway, Kilgore, TX, in Gregg County. Kilgore, a city of approximately 14,000, is in the northeast section of the state commonly referred to as the Piney Woods. This area is one of the most scenic in Texas with its pine and hardwood forests, lakes, rivers, streams, and hills. The area is also rich in natural resources. Kilgore lies in the middle of what was once one of the most productive oil fields in the continental United States.

Located four miles south of Interstate 20 on US Hwy. 259, Kilgore is 120 miles east of Dallas, TX, 70 miles west of Shreveport, LA, and 10 miles southwest of Longview, TX, a city of over 82,000 residents.

KC-Longview, at 300 S. High in Longview, also offers day and evening courses for college transfer, occupational education courses, and adult and continuing education courses. Kilgore College offers courses in selected academic transfer, workforce, and adult and continuing education programs at area public schools.

Additional college facilities are as follows:

  • The East Texas Oil Museum
  • The Rangerette Museum and Showcase
  • Bert E. Woodruff Adult Education Center
    • East Texas Police Academy
    • Fire Academy
  • Spear Firing Range
  • R. E. St. John Memorial Stadium
  • Health Science Center 

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Admissions

Admission Forms:

Kilgore College (KC) welcomes applications for admission. Kilgore College has no application fee and accepts the ApplyTexas application or the myKC application for admission (www.kilgore.edu). All other admissions information is available online or from the Office of Admissions and Registrar, Kilgore College, 1100 Broadway, Kilgore, TX 75662-3204, phone (903) 983-8209. Individuals who do not enroll in the semester for which they applied will be required to complete a reactivation form or a new admissions application.

General Admission Policy:

The college has an "open door" admission policy ensuring that all persons who can profit from post-secondary education will have an opportunity to enroll. Admission to the college does not imply admission to all programs. Applicants to any of the health occupations programs must meet special entrance requirements and complete an application form for the desired program. Specific requirements for these programs are explained under "Health Science Programs."

General Admission:

KC offers the following general admission categories:

  • Freshman/GED: High school/home school graduates or GED recipients with no previous college coursework (dual credit courses do not count as previous college coursework for admission purposes)
  • Transfer: Students who have attended another institution of higher education after high school graduation
  • Transient: Visiting students who are attending another institution of higher education and plan to attend KC for a single term or the summer with the intention of returning to their home institution
  • Readmission: Former KC students seeking readmission

The college also offers special admission options.  All materials required for admission to the college must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Registrar prior to registering for classes.

Admissions Application Priority Dates:

Kilgore College encourages all applicants to start the admissions process early.  Students submitting applications and completing the admissions process by the respective admissions priority date can take full advantage of early registration opportunities.  Students registering early are more likely to get the courses they desire on their preferred dates and times.  Later applicants may find less flexibility in scheduling.  Kilgore College’s Admissions Application Priority Dates are as follows:

  • Fall Semester: July 1
  • Spring Semester: November 1
  • Summer Terms: April 1

Transcripts for Admission Purposes:

Any reference to high school or college transcripts submitted for admission means that an official transcript is required. To be considered "official", transcripts must:

  • Be issued within the last 6 months and bear the signature of the registrar and/or seal of the issuing institution
  • Be submitted directly from the issuing institution to KC (hand-carried transcripts may be considered if in an unopened, sealed college/high school letterhead envelope)
  • High school and home school transcripts without a graduation date are not considered official. A final transcript with graduation date must be provided after the graduation date
  • Unofficial transcripts may be considered on an individual and temporary basis, but official transcripts must be received in the first two weeks of the student’s first semester of attendance
  • Lacking academic credentials will result in a hold on the student’s account preventing future registration and the release of official KC transcripts

All transcripts submitted become the property of KC and cannot be returned. Records of students who do not enroll may be destroyed after one year. 

Freshmen:

Students who have a diploma from an accredited public or private high school; who have completed a nontraditional secondary education course of study in a non-accredited private school setting, including a home school; or who have successfully completed a Certificate of High School Equivalency (formerly called the GED) and who have attempted no college (other than dual credit coursework) must meet the following requirements:

  1. Submit an Application for Admission as early as possible prior to registering for classes.
  2. Submit an official high school transcript with graduation date or proof of  obtaining a Certificate of High School Equivalency. Home School transcripts must be signed by the home school teacher or administrator and notarized by a notary public.
  3. Submit Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Assessment test scores or submit proof of exemption from TSI.
  4. Students who took college courses for dual credit at a school other than Kilgore College must submit an official college transcript in addition to the high school/home school transcript.

Kilgore College will not recognize a student as a high school graduate who has obtained a diploma through a school or online program that requires only payment of a fee with little or no coursework requirements. Determination of the legitimacy of these diplomas will be at the discretion of the Office of Admissions and Registrar. Graduates of such programs will be considered for admission on an individual approval basis (see Individual Approval section below).

Transfer:

Students who are transferring from another college or university must meet the following requirements:

  1. Submit an Application for Admission as early as possible prior to registering for classes
  2. Verify Texas Success Initiative (TSI) status and take the TSI assessment if scores or proof of exemption is not provided.
  3. Submit to KC an official transcript directly from each college or university attended.  

Note: Transfer students meeting the above requirements who are seeking a KC degree will be informed of the amount of credit which will transfer to Kilgore College as soon as possible and no later than the end of the first academic term in which they are enrolled. However, students seeking to transfer credit from non-regionally accredited institutions must submit a "petition for transfer credit" form. Students must also furnish supporting documents to substantiate that the course outcomes and faculty credentials are equivalent to those of KC courses, as described in the form. 

Readmission:

Readmission is available to formerly enrolled students who have not enrolled in KC for one or more long semesters (spring or fall term) and who wish to return. Students who have been away from KC for one long semester (spring or fall term) may submit a reactivation form available in the Office of Admissions and Registrar.  Students who have been away from KC for more than one long semester must reapply for admission.  Whether these students were forced to leave (academic or disciplinary suspension) or chose to leave, they must meet the following requirements:

  1. Submit a new Application for Admission or Reactivation Form as applicable as early as possible prior to registering for classes. We recommend students apply by the appropriate application priority date.
  2. Submit an official transcript from every college or university attended since the last enrollment at KC as applicable. 

Transient (Visiting) Students:

Transient students are those pursuing a degree elsewhere who attend Kilgore College for a long semester (fall or spring), December Mini, May Mini or summer terms and intend to return to their previous college or university. Students must be enrolled at their prior institution in the long semester (fall or spring) immediately preceding admission as a Kilgore College transient student.  Traditionally, transient students enroll while home for the winter or summer breaks or for a single long semester.

Transient students are limited to one long semester (fall or spring) the December Mini, or May Mini and/or summer terms.  Previous transient students are required to reapply if they return as a transient student for a future term.  Should a transient student decide to continue at Kilgore College immediately following the transient term, the student must reapply as a transfer student and meet all transfer admission requirements.

When applying for admission, select the appropriate semester. December Mini students should use the spring admissions application.  May Mini students should select the summer admissions application. The applicant should select the Non Degree-Seeking Academic major option. Also indicate you are a transient-seeking a degree elsewhere on the application. We recommend you apply by the appropriate application priority date. Students must request an official transcript from the school which they are currently attending to be sent to Kilgore College. Proof of other prerequisites may be required if the student has attended more than one college.

All visiting students should consult their academic advisor at their home institution to ensure applicability of courses prior to KC registration. It is the responsibility of the transient student to request an official KC transcript be sent to their home institution: https://www.kilgore.edu/current-students/registration-transcripts/transcript-request 

Transient students cannot use financial aid awarded at their home institution at Kilgore College.

Request for Readmission Under the Second Chance Policy:

Section 51.931 of the Texas Education Code provides Texas residents with the "Right to an Academic Fresh Start". A student who is returning to Kilgore College after an absence of at least 10 years may seek a fresh start by requesting approval to use the Second Chance Policy upon application for readmission. Under this policy, all Kilgore College coursework completed 10 or more years prior to readmission is eliminated from computation of the grade point average (GPA). None of the coursework can be used to meet degree or prerequisite requirements, though the work remains on the student's record. In addition, coursework cannot be used to satisfy Texas Success Initiative requirements. Further, no credit will be given for transfer coursework earned 10 or more years ago. A student readmitted under this policy is placed on academic probation.

The student must seek application of this policy when applying to return to KC. The policy must be used on or before the last day of the semester or term in which the student returns to school.

Financial aid and veterans benefits may be affected by this policy. Acceptability of this policy by other colleges is solely at the discretion of the receiving institution. Additional information about this policy is available from the Office of Admissions and Registrar. Phone (903) 983-8606.

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Special Admission Options

Dual Credit/Early Admissions:

Students who exhibit exceptional academic ability may apply for admission to KC and take college courses while completing high school according to the following policy. All students who enroll in classes at KC prior to high school graduation are considered dual credit students.

  • To be eligible for enrollment in dual credit courses, students normally have at least junior year high school standing at the time the course is taken and demonstrate appropriate college readiness for the courses that are taken. Exception: Younger students who demonstrate outstanding academic performance and show college readiness may be recommended by their high school and individually approved by the Vice President of Instruction.
  • High school students are generally limited to no more than two courses per semester. Exception: Students who have met the required minimum scores in reading, writing, and math may enroll in three dual credit courses during the fall or spring semesters (students wishing to enroll in more than three courses require permission from the high school principal and the KC VP of Instruction). In a standard summer term, a student may enroll in a maximum of two courses. Students may enroll in only one mini-term course at a time.
  • Students taking dual credit courses for the first time after their junior year must meet the minimum ACT, SAT, STAAR End-of-Course (English III and Algebra II), or TSI Assessment scores in the sections(s) of the test relevant to the course(s) in which they wish to enroll.
  • Students taking dual credit courses for the first time after their sophomore year (or those seeking approval to enroll prior to completion of the sophomore year) must meet the minimum PLAN, PSAT, ACT, SAT, STAAR End-of-Course (English II and Algebra I), or TSI Assessment scores in the sections(s) of the test relevant to the course(s) in which they wish to enroll. NOTE: PLAN and PSAT scores can only be used for enrollment during the junior year. ).
  • Students taking workforce education/technical courses may enroll based on designated STAAR scores (must meet program and course prerequisites; additional testing may be required prior to enrollment in college after high school graduation).
  • A dual credit student may neither enroll in a college level course in which he/she requires remediation nor take remedial classes at Kilgore College.
  • A final high school transcript must be provided upon graduation, even if not attending KC after graduation.
  • General academic courses offered through the dual credit program are courses that are commonly required for either an associate's or bachelor's degree. Acceptance of credit by another institution, however, is left to the discretion of the receiving institution. Public universities in Texas are not required to accept more than 66 hours of transfer coursework from a community college.

For a complete explanation of KC's dual credit policy, please see the Dual Credit Handbook: https://www.kilgore.edu/academics/dual-credit-for-high-school-students

Individual Approval:

Students who do not meet the Freshman or Transfer admissions guidelines, may be admitted conditionally on an individual approval basis at the discretion of the Office of Admissions and Registrar. This category includes students who have not graduated from high school or earned a Certificate of High School Equivalency or whose high school credential is not recognized by the Office of Admissions and Registrar. Students admitted as Individual Approval must provide evidence of successful completion of the Certificate of High School Equivalency or graduation from a recognized high school during the first semester of enrollment, or future enrollment will be blocked.  

Federal regulations state that students admitted with this status must successfully complete one of the following requirements in order to be eligible for Title IV financial aid consideration:

  • Take the Certificate of High School Equivalency test, with all sections passed, and furnish proof of the certificate to the Office of Admissions and Registrar
  • Submit an official transcript from a bona fide high school as recognized by the Office of Admissions and Registrar
  • Submit an official transcript from a bona fide home school as recognized by the Office of Admissions and Registrar   

International Student Admission:

All non-immigrant alien students seeking F-1 Visa category are managed by the Office of Admissions and Registrar. Students must submit and meet the following criteria: 

  1. A completed Application for International Student Admission to the Office of Admissions and Registrar 60 days prior to the beginning of registration.
  2. Request official Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or approved alternate exam results be sent to KC. Official scores must be sent directly from ETS to Kilgore College (DI Code: 6341). KC requires a minimum iBT score of 41 (computer-based, 132, or paper-based, 450).
  3. A financial statement proving that the applicant has sufficient resources for support during the entire period of study in the United States. (Amounts provided on the international student section of the Kilgore College website.)
  4. International transcripts should be evaluated, translated to English, and sent directly to Kilgore College's Office of Admissions and Registrar. Kilgore College requires evaluations and translations be conducted by a National Association of Credit Evaluation Services member. http://www.naces.org/
  5. If the student has attended a school(s) in the United States, official transcript(s) must be sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Registrar from the issuing institution.
  6. A medical record giving evidence of immunization against tetanus, diphtheria, poliomyelitis, mumps, measles, rubella, and bacterial meningitis.
  7. Kilgore College does not accept international students who are out of status in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

Note: The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service Form I-20 will not be issued until admission procedures are completed to the satisfaction of the Office of Admissions and Registrar.

Note: KC provides English language courses to assist students in attaining the level of English proficiency needed to enroll in academic courses. International students are subject to the requirements of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI-Assessment).

Additional English proficiency testing may be required prior to registration.  During the entire period of study at KC, each international student is required to purchase health and accident medical insurance.

International Application Priority Dates:

Kilgore College encourages all applicants to start the admissions process early. Applications submitted after the respective international admissions priority date will not be guaranteed acceptance for that semester. Kilgore College’s Admissions Application Priority Dates for international students are as follows: 

  • Fall Semester: July 15
  • Spring Semester: Nov. 15
  • Summer Semester: March 15

Health Science Programs:

Health science programs have additional entrance requirements and recommend early application. Admission to the college in no way implies or guarantees entrance to the professional health science programs. Prior to making application to any professional health science program, the student should contact the health science academic advisor, located in the Canterbury Engineering Science (CANT), office 208, at (903) 983-8184 or at www.kilgore.edu . Entrance procedures are designed to ensure fairness to each applicant. To ensure orderly and timely progress toward acceptance, progression, and completion of the desired health science program, the student is responsible for seeking advice, for knowing and meeting requirements of the health science program of interest, for enrolling in courses appropriate to that program, and for taking courses in the proper sequence.

Note: An applicant must show evidence of good physical and mental health. If accepted into a health science program, the student must submit a medical record and certification of immunizations for measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR), tetanus, and, in most cases, Hepatitis B. Updated immunizations are an integral part of health care and provide protection against these communicable diseases. 

Auditing Courses:

The Office of Admissions and Registrar may grant a student permission to audit a course for special reasons. Courses involving computers, equipment, labs, clinicals, etc. also require departmental approval. Such permission gives the student only the privilege of observing and does not include submitting papers or taking tests. A student desiring to audit a course fills out an application for admission, submits official transcripts, completes an audit request form, and registers in the Office of Admissions and Registrar only after regular registration and on a space-available basis. Audit students are required to meet the same admissions requirements as all other students, with the exception of placement testing. Tuition and fees for auditing are the same as those fees charged for enrolling in a course for credit. The college will not refund tuition and fees paid to audit a course. 


Immunizations:

The college highly recommends that each student take precautionary measures by keeping inoculations current. According to the Texas Department of Health, those born in 1957 or later may not have been properly immunized. The single dose measles immunization that many received is inadequate. The classroom setting increases the chance of exposure. If a student was born after January 2, 1957, the student should see his or her physician or visit a public health clinic for proper immunization against measles (two doses of measles vaccine administered on or after the first birthday and at least 30 days apart), rubella (one dose of rubella vaccine on or after the first birthday), and mumps (one dose of mumps vaccine on or after the first birthday). The tetanus vaccine is effective for about ten years and should be boosted at ten-year intervals in combination with the diphtheria vaccine. It is common for older adults to develop tetanus because many have not received booster shots. 

Bacterial Meningitis Vaccination Requirement:

Bacterial Meningitis is a serious, potentially deadly disease that can progress extremely fast - so take utmost caution. It is an inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. The bacteria that cause meningitis can also infect the blood. This disease strikes about 3,000 Americans each year, including 100-125 on college campuses, leading to 5-15 deaths among college students every year. There is treatment, but those who survive may develop severe health problems or disabilities. All entering students under 22 years of age must provide documentation of receiving an initial bacterial meningitis vaccination dose or booster within the last 5 years. All new, transfer, or former students who are returning must show proof of having the vaccination at least 10 days prior to the start of the semester. Students may not register until documentation of vaccination is on file. Proof of the bacterial meningitis vaccination must be provided to the Office of Admissions and Registrar (provide copies, not originals). Kilgore College will not return vaccination records submitted nor provide copies for use at other schools. Records may be mailed, faxed, or delivered in person. n.

Kilgore College
Office of Admissions and Registrar
1100 Broadway
Kilgore, TX 75662
Fax: (903) 983-8607
Devall Student Center-2nd floor

Exemptions from Bacterial Meningitis Vaccination Requirement:

Students age 22 or older are exempt. A student is not required to submit evidence of receiving the vaccination against bacterial meningitis if the student, or a parent or guardian of a student, submits to the institution an affidavit or a certificate signed by a physician who is duly registered and licensed to practice medicine in the United States, in which it is stated that, in the physician's opinion, the vaccination required would be injurious to the health and well-being of the student.

The only means by which a student can object to vaccination for enrollment purposes is to use the Texas Department of State Health Services' current, official form for conscientious objection. Complete the online form at https://webds.dshs.state.tx.us/immcojc/. After entering all the requested information, print the form, sign it, date it and submit the form to the Office of Admissions and Registrar before registering for courses. 

How Can I Find Out More Information?


Requirements of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI)

The Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requires that all students entering a public college or university for the first time be tested in the areas of reading, writing and math before registering for any college-level classes unless exempt. Students are encouraged to test as early as possible.

Kilgore College Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Plan:

  1. A student who has a deficiency in one or more areas will be given an individualized plan that lists the developmental coursework that is required for that student to become college ready. Students who score at ABE levels 3 and 4 will enroll in Basic Academic Skills Education (BASE) courses in the appropriate areas of English, reading, and/or math to improve foundation skills.
  2. Students must be continuously enrolled in all mandated areas of developmental coursework until they complete the success initiative in all three areas
  3. Excessive Developmental Hours: A student is allowed to enroll for a total of 18 hours of developmental courses at the normal tuition rate. Developmental hours exceeding the 18 hour college career limit will be assessed an additional $70 per semester hour charge. 

Exemptions:

The following students shall be exempt from the requirements of this title, whereby exempt students shall not be required to provide any additional demonstration of college readiness and shall be allowed to enroll in any entry-level freshman course as defined in §4.53(12) of this title (relating to Definitions):

The following students are exempt from the provisions of the Texas Success Initiative:

You have met the qualifying standards listed below:

  • For a period of five (5) years from the date of testing, a student who is tested and performs at or above the following standards that cannot be raised by institutions:
    • ACT: composite score of 23 with a minimum of 19 on the English test shall be exempt for both the reading and writing sections of the TSI Assessment, and/or 19 on the mathematics test shall be exempt for the mathematics section of the TSI Assessment;
    • SAT
      • SAT administered prior to March 5, 2016: a combined critical reading (formerly "verbal") and mathematics score of 1070 with a minimum of 500 on the critical reading test shall be exempt for both reading and writing sections of the TSI Assessment; a combined critical reading (formerly "verbal") and mathematics score of 1070 with a minimum of 500 on the mathematics test shall be exempt for the mathematics section of the TSI Assessment.
      • SAT administered on or after March 5, 2016: a minimum score of 480 on the Evidenced-Based Reading and Writing (EBRW) test shall be exempt for both reading and writing sections of the TSI Assessment; a minimum score of 530 on the mathematics test shall be exempt for the mathematics section of the TSI Assessment. There is no combined score.
      • Mixing or combining scores from the SAT administered prior to March 5, 2016 and the SAT administered on or after March 5, 2016 is not allowable.
  • For a period of three (3) years from the date of testing, a student who is tested and performs on the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS) with a minimum scale score of 1770 on the writing test, a Texas Learning Index (TLI) of 86 on the mathematics test and 89 on the reading test.
  • For a period of five (5) years from the date of testing, a student who is tested and performs at or above the following standards that cannot be raised by institutions:
    • on the Eleventh grade exit-level Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) with a minimum scale score of 2200 on the math section and/or a minimum scale score of 2200 on the English Language Arts section with a writing subsection score of at least 3, shall be exempt from the TSI Assessment required under this title for those corresponding sections; or
    • STAAR end-of-course (EOC) with a minimum Level 2 score of 4000 on the English III shall be exempt from the TSI Assessment required under this title for both reading and writing, and a minimum Level 2 score of 4000 on the Algebra II EOC shall be exempt from the TSI Assessment required under this title for the mathematics section
  • A student who has graduated with an associate or baccalaureate degree from an institution of higher education.
  • A student who transfers to an institution from a private or independent institution of higher education or an accredited out-of-state institution of higher education and who has satisfactorily completed college-level coursework as determined by the receiving institution.
  • A student who has previously attended any institution and has been determined to have met readiness standards by that institution. For students meeting non-Algebra intensive readiness standards in mathematics as defined in §4.59(d)(1)(B) of this title (relating to Determination of Readiness to Perform Entry-Level Freshman Coursework), institutions may choose to require additional preparatory coursework/interventions for Algebra intensive courses, including MATH 1314/1324/1414 (or their local equivalent). It is the institution's responsibility to ensure that students are clearly informed of the consequences of successful completion of a mathematics pathways model which results in meeting the mathematics college readiness standard only for specific courses.
  • A student who is enrolled in a certificate program of one year or less (Level-One certificates, 42 or fewer semester credit hours or the equivalent) at a public junior college, a public technical institute, or a public state college.
  • A student who is serving on active duty as a member of the armed forces of the United States, the Texas National Guard, or as a member of a reserve component of the armed forces of the United States and has been serving for at least three years preceding enrollment.
  • A student who on or after August 1, 1990, was honorably discharged, retired, or released from active duty as a member of the armed forces of the United States or the Texas National Guard or service as a member of a reserve component of the armed forces of the United States.
  • A student who successfully completes a college preparatory course under Texas Education Code §28.014 is exempt for a period of twenty-four (24) months from the date of high school graduation with respect to the content area of the course. The student must enroll in the student's first college-level course in the exempted content area in the student's first year of enrollment in an institution of higher education. This exemption applies only at the institution of higher education that partners with the school district in which the student is enrolled to provide the course. Additionally, an institution of higher education may enter into a Memorandum of Understanding with a partnering institution of higher education to accept the exemption for the college preparatory course.

(b) An institution may exempt a non-degree-seeking or non-certificate-seeking student.

(c) ESOL Waiver--An institution may grant a temporary waiver from the assessment required under this title for students with demonstrated limited English proficiency in order to provide appropriate ESOL/ESL coursework and interventions. The waiver must be removed after the student attempts 15 credit hours of developmental ESOL coursework or prior to enrolling in entry-level freshman coursework, whichever comes first, at which time the student would be administered the TSI Assessment. Funding limits as defined in Texas Education Code, §51.3062(l)(1) and (2) for developmental education still apply.

(d) Any student who has been determined to be exempt in mathematics, reading, and/or writing under subsection (a) or (b) of this section shall not be required to enroll in developmental coursework and/or interventions in the corresponding area of exemption.

Source Note: The provisions of this §4.54 adopted to be effective December 3, 2003, 28 TexReg 10753; amended to be effective May 17, 2004, 29 TexReg 4868; amended to be effective August 15, 2004, 29 TexReg 7971; amended to be effective November 28, 2012, 37 TexReg 9358; amended to be effective August 15, 2013, 38 TexReg 5063; amended to be effective November 21, 2013, 38 TexReg 8195; amended to be effective September 4, 2014, 39 TexReg 6841; amended to be effective November 25, 2015, 40 TexReg 8203; amended to be effective August 30, 2016, 41 TexReg 6480; amended to be effective May 11, 2017, 42 TexReg2405

Transfer Students:

A student who transfers college-level courses from a regionally accredited private or out-of-state institution may use transferred courses that are equivalent to the following to satisfy the success initiative in the given area. Students must have earned a "C" or better in each course for exemption in each respective area.

Writing:

ENGL 1301 (Composition I)
ENGL 1302 (Composition II)

Reading:

ENGL 1301 (Composition I)
ENGL 1302 (Composition II)

ENGL 2322, 2323 (British Literature I, British Literature II)
ENGL 2332, 2333 (World Literature I, World Literature II)
ENGL 2326 (American Literature)

GOVT 2305, 2306 (Federal Government, Texas Government)

HIST 1301, 1302 (United States History I, United States History II)
PHIL 1301 (Introduction to Philosophy)

PHIL 2306 (Introduction to Ethics)

PSYC 2301 (General Psychology)
PSYC 2314 (Lifespan Growth and Development)

SOCI 1301 (Introductory Sociology)

SOCI 1306 (Social Problems)

Mathematics:

MATH 1332 (Contemporary Mathematics)
MATH 1314 (College Algebra)
MATH 1324 (Math for Business and Economics)
MATH 1342 (Elementary Statistical Methods)
Any advanced mathematics course for which the above are prerequisites

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Non-Degree Seeking Students

Casual Students:

Students who, upon enrollment, are not seeking a degree or level-two certificate and who are attending Kilgore College on a temporary basis will not be required to take a test for TSI purposes if he/she meets the prerequisites and/or placement requirements for the course to be taken. These students will be exempt from the requirements of the success initiative under the following conditions:

  1. Student does not declare a major
  2. Student does not accumulate more than 9 college-level hours within one academic year
  3. Student must register through the counseling center

Transient Students:

A student who is enrolled in a private or out-of-state institution of higher education and is attending Kilgore College on a temporary basis is not required to take a test for TSI purposes.

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International Students (Non-Native Speakers):

All international students who are non-native speakers will be assessed with TSI Assessment.  These students also qualify for the ESOL Waiver.  An institution may grant a temporary waiver from the assessment for students with demonstrated limited English proficiency in order to provide appropriate ESOL/ESL coursework and interventions. The waiver must be removed prior to the student attempting 15 credit hours of developmental ESOL coursework or attempting entry-level freshman coursework, whichever comes first.

Based on these scores, students will be given a plan that lists the required ESOL courses.

  • ESOL 0311 - Listening
  • ESOL 0322 - Reading
  • ESOL 0324 - Advanced Reading
  • ESOL 0343 - Writing
  • ESOL 0344 - Advanced Writing

Advisement:

Students who have not completed the Texas Success Initiative must see an advisor each semester prior to registration. The advisor will monitor their progress toward completing required developmental coursework and will assist each one with course scheduling.

Evaluation of the Kilgore College Texas Success Initiative:

This plan will be monitored for compliance with state requirements by the Language Development and Mathematics department chairs in conjunction with the Counseling Center and will be updated accordingly.

KC Testing Guidelines for the Texas Success Initiative:

  • Students are required to have a Kilgore College assigned student ID number application for admission on file in the before taking the TSI Assessment.
  • Students taking the TSI Assessment must complete a pre-assessment activity prior to testing.  This is mandated by the state.
  • Students who have started a developmental sequence may improve placement or may exit the developmental sequence by retaking and passing the TSI Assessment at any time.
  • Kilgore College requires students enrolling in both Level I and II certificate programs to take the TSI Assessment. 

Tuition & Fees:

Payment of tuition and fees entitles the student to admission to classes, copies of transcripts, a subscription to the college newspaper, use of the Student Center facilities, campus health services, and the use of the recreational facilities for students taking eight hours or more.

The college reserves the right to change tuition and fees in keeping with the acts of the Texas Legislature and the KC Board of Trustees.

Payment of Tuition and Fees

Registration is not completed until payment of tuition and fees is made. A student may make full payment in person by cash, check or money order payable to Kilgore College. Visa, MasterCard, or Discover credit card payments are acceptable upon presentation of the credit card. The student must provide positive identification for any payment to the college. The college will accept checks for the amount of transaction only. Two-party checks, payroll checks, or postdated checks are not acceptable. Full payments are also available by credit card on the Kilgore College website at www.kilgore.edu.

Installment Plan

Payment options, including Installment Plans, are available on the Kilgore College website at www.kilgore.edu . A credit card or bank account number is required for payments made via the web. Installment plans are only available on the website and may not be set up in person.

Collection Fee

Kilgore College reserves the right to send unpaid accounts to a collection agency. The student will be responsible for any collections and/or attorney's fees.

Returned Checks

The college will assess a $30.00 service charge for each returned check, including "stop payment" orders. Excessive returned checks will result in suspension of check writing privileges.

Holds

All monetary holds on student accounts must be paid by cash, money order, or credit card. CHECKS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.



Tuition and Fees by Residency Classification

Residency Classification:

Texas Education Code Section 54.052 outlines the guidelines for determining Texas residency classification.  Guidelines for determining in-district and out-of-district classification are based on the Kilgore College Tax District and policies of the Kilgore College Board of Trustees, and are detailed below.  Tuition is based on residency status and the number of semester hours in which a student enrolls. The following define the types of residency status:

  • An in-district student is a resident of the State of Texas domiciled within the Kilgore College District composed of the school districts of Kilgore, Sabine, Gladewater, White Oak, Leverett's Chapel, Overton, and West Rusk County Consolidated. Kilgore College taxes must be assessed on the residential property where the student is domiciled and provided to the Office of Admissions and Registrar when requested.
  • An out-of-district student is a resident of the State of Texas domiciled outside the Kilgore College District.
  • non-resident student is a resident outside the state of Texas, including international students.

Reclassification of Residency Status:

The college will require the student to sign an oath of residency as part of the admission process. It is the student's responsibility to use the proper residence classification. If there is any question as to right of classification as a resident of Texas or the Kilgore College District, it is the student's obligation, prior to or at the time of registration, to raise the question with the Office of Admissions and Registrar.

The student should report any change in residency status to the Office of Admissions and Registrar before registration. Likewise, a student classified as a non-resident will remain in that status until such time as the student has requested reclassification and the Office of Admissions and Registrar has officially approved the request. If inaccurate or fraudulent information is provided by the student to document residency status, the student will be held liable for repayment of any tuition/fees that were under-charged as a result of that information. Reclassification requests must be initiated by the student. Residency status changes are not made automatically.

For reclassification to be effective for a specific semester, the request for reclassification and any documentation must be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Registrar on or before the official reporting date (ORD) of the semester. The ORD may be found in the college academic calendar or by calling the Office of Admissions and Registrar. The student should direct all questions concerning residency status to the Office of Admissions and Registrar, located in the Devall Student Center. Phone (903) 983-8606.

Documentation of Basis for Texas Residency Status:

Classification as a Texas resident requires that the student substantiate residence in Texas for the immediate twelve months preceding registration. Factors other than time in the state may affect residency classification. For example, the legal home address of a student who is dependent for income tax purposes is considered to be the address of the parent(s) claiming the student. Also, students who come to Texas for the purpose of education are ineligible to claim Texas residency for tuition purposes as long as they remain in school. A complete evaluation of individual circumstances is provided at the time of application for admission. Additional information is available from the Office of Admissions and Registrar (903) 983-8202. In addition to the core residency questionnaire, documents acceptable for this purpose may include, but are not limited to, an official Texas high school transcript, the employer's statement of date of employment, lease agreement, a permanent Texas driver's license (at least one year old), and a Texas voter registration.

Documentation of Basis for In-District Residency Status:

All Texas residents are classified as out-of-district until sufficient information is on file to verify in-district residency. The legal home address of a student who is dependent for income tax purposes is the address of the parent/guardian claiming the student. Therefore, the residency status of a dependent student is based upon the residence of the parent/guardian. EXCEPTION: If a parent/guardian who does not claim the student for income tax purposes lives in-district, the student may be granted in-district residency (proof of parental status/guardianship and in-district residence are required). Students who are independent for income tax purposes must establish their own residence in the district. Students who are under age 24 must provide proof of independence. Documents acceptable for verifying in-district residency may include, but are not limited to, a permanent Texas driver's license, a property tax receipt, a lease agreement, and a utility bill. Additional information is available from the Office of Admissions and Registrar (903) 983-8202.

Waiver for Property Ownership:

The KC Board of Trustees has waived the difference between out-of-district resident rates and in-district rates for a person and his or her dependents who own residential real estate in the Kilgore College District. Additional information for required documentation is available from the Office of Admissions and Registrar (903) 983-8202.


Rates for Tuition & Fees (2018-2019):

In-District student tuition rates (per semester):

  • Tuition: $46 per semester hour
  • General Education Fee: $33 per semester hour
  • TOTAL: $79 per semester hour

Out-of-District student tuition rates (per semester):

  • Tuition: $46 per semester hour
  • Out-of-District Fee: $79 per semester hour
  • General Education Fee: $33 per semester hour
  • TOTAL: $158 per semester hour

Non-Resident (out-of-state and international) student tuition rates per semester:

  • Tuition: $96 per semester hour (minimum tuition charge of $200 per long semester, $100 minimum per summer term)
  • Out-of-District Fee: $79 per semester hour
  • General Education Fee: $33 per semester hour
  • TOTAL: $208 per semester hour

Simplified Chart for Tuition & Fees (2018-2019):

Semester

In-District

Out-of-District

Non-Resident

Hours

District

District

Semester

1

$79.00

$158.00

$208.00

2

$158.00

$316.00

$416.00

3

$237.00

$474.00

$624.00

4

$316.00

$632.00

$832.00

5

$395.00

$790.00

$1,040.00

6

$474.00

$948.00

$1,248.00

7

$553.00

$1,106.00

$1,456.00

8

$632.00

$1,264.00

$1,664.00

9

$711.00

$1,422.00

$1,872.00

10

$790.00

$1,580.00

$2,080.00

11

$869.00

$1,738.00

$2,288.00

12

$948.00

$1,896.00

$2,496.00

13

$1,027.00

$2,054.00

$2,704.00

14

$1,106.00

$2,212.00

$2,912.00

15

$1,185.00

$2,370.00

$3,120.00

16

$1,264.00

$2,528.00

$3,328.00

17

$1,343.00

$2,686.00

$3,536.00

18

$1,422.00

$2,844.00

$3,744.00

19

$1,501.00

$3,002.00

$3,952.00

20

$1,580.00

$3,160.00

$4,160.00

21

$1,659.00

$3,318.00

$4,368.00

22

$1,738.00

$3,476.00

$4,576.00

23

$1,817.00

$3,634.00

$4,784.00

  • Fees are subject to change. Chart does not include certain special course fees. See Course Descriptions.
  • Information on this page is current as of March 2018.
  • View the current Registration Guide for any updates or revisions.
  • Dual Credit tuition per credit hour is $46 for in-district and $94 for out-of-district students.
  • Course-related fees may apply.

Dual Credit Tuition Charges:

In-District (per semester):

  • $46/credit hour + $1 General Education Fee
  • TOTAL: $47 per semester hour

Out-of-District (per semester):

  • $93/credit hour + $1 General Education Fee
  • TOTAL: $94 per semester hour

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Special Fees:

ACCUPLACER ESL

$40

ADN Computer Software Fee

$150 per semester

Auditing a Course

(tuition & fees same as if enrolled)

Cengage Computer Competency Test

$35

Checks, Returned

$30

Cisco Local Area Network Testing Fee

$31.25 per course

Credit by Exam; for Experience or Departmental Exam (Advanced Placement)

(equal to in-district tuition/fees as if enrolled

Credit Card Convenience Fee

$2 per transaction

Distance Learning Fee (Web or Hybrid courses)

$25 per course

Excess Developmental

$70 per semester hour

FAX

$5

Hepatitis B Vaccination (health occupations students, if needed)

$150

HESI A2 (Nursing Entrance Test)

$65

High Cost Workforce Development Course Fee

$25 per semester hour

Insurance (EMT)

$70 per year

Insurance (Health Occupations)

$30 per year

Insurance (EDUC 1301 and EDUC 2301 – per year)

$30 per year

Late Registration (Prior to 6th day of semester)

$20

Late Registration (After 5th day of semester)

$50

Matriculation Fee

$15

Posting AP Credit to transcript

$25 per course

Proctoring Fee

$30 per test

Reinstatement Fee *

$25

Repeat Three

$70 per semester hour

Texas Commission on Fire Protection

$30/test

TSI Assessment - Full Test

$40

TSI Assessment - Partial Test (2 sections)

$20

Unfunded Exception Fee

$70 per semester hour

VCT (Virtual College Texas) Reservation Fee

$15 per course

Note: Fees are subject to change. Some fees are non-refundable.
*Applies to classes added back after each non-payment drop after late registration.
For housing information click here

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Refund Policy

In order to receive a refund of tuition and fees, a student must officially drop or withdraw through the Office of Admissions and Registrar. The student is personally responsible for dropping a class and/or withdrawing from enrollment. The college will refund tuition and fees for courses dropped or for withdrawal from school within the timetable published in the online Registration Guide. Refunds will be issued in the same semester as the withdrawal. If a scheduled course fails to materialize, the college will return 100% of tuition and fees, with the exception of late fees, matriculation fees, and reinstatement fees. A matriculation fee will be charged for students who enroll in courses and then completely withdraw from those courses for a particular semester. The college will not issue a refund to a student who does not have a clear financial record with the college.

See the current online Registration Guide for actual dates of check disbursements.

Note: Class day is defined as the day the semester or session is designated to begin and each school day thereafter. The timetable shown in the online Registration Guide applies to all refunds, including refunds to early-registered students who withdraw before classes start. No refunds will be made earlier than this schedule.


Room and Board Fees:

An online application for housing accompanied with a $200 deposit plus a $10 non-refundable criminal history screening fee must be filed with the Office of Residential Life. The deposit is separate from the fees for room and board. The refund policy for the deposit may be found in the student handbook. Additional information may be obtained from the Office of Residential Life located in the Devall Student Center or you may reach us at (903) 983-8191.

Information below is for fall or spring semesters:

Nolen Hall:

  • Double Room: $1,030
  • Meal Plan: $1,475
  • Mailbox Rental: $15
  • Total for Semester: $2,520

Nolen Hall Premium:

  • Double Room: $1,340
  • Meal Plan: $1,475
  • Mailbox Rental: $15
  • Total for Semester: $2,830

The Quads:

  • Double Room: $1,135
  • Meal Plan: $1,475
  • Mailbox Rental: $15
  • Total for Semester: $2,625

Stark Hall:

  • Double Room: $930
  • Meal Plan: $1,475
  • Mailbox Rental: $15
  • Total for Semester: $2,420

Rangerette Residence:

  • Double Room: $1,630
  • Meal Plan: $1,475
  • Mailbox Rental: $15
  • Total for Semester: $3,120

Private Rooms:

  • For a Private Room in Nolen Hall or Stark Hall, add $500.
  • For a Private Room in Nolen Hall Premium or The Quads, add $750.

Summer Semesters:

  • Summer I Room and Meal Plan: $855
  • Summer II Room and Meal Plan: $930
  • Mini-Semesters: $200

For more information on housing, email KCHousing@kilgore.edu.

Note: Those students involved in certain programs or athletic teams that require early arrival in the fall semester will have an extended meal plan at a higher rate. For information on these extended plans, please contact the Office of Residential Life at (903) 983-8191.

Fees are subject to change based on increased services made available to residents. Housing fees include room rent, meal plan, and mailbox rental fee. All residents must purchase the meal plan and the mail box rental. Private rooms are based on availability with priority given to sophomore residents. Room and board fees for summer housing will be announced prior to the end of the spring semester. Please refer to the Student Handbook for the refund policy for housing. Full payment in person by cash, check or money order payable to Kilgore College. Visa, MasterCard, or Discover credit card payments are acceptable upon presentation of the credit card. The student must provide positive identification for any payment to the college. The college will accept checks for the amount of transaction only. Two-party checks, payroll checks, or postdated checks are not acceptable.

Full payments are also available on the Kilgore College website at www.kilgore.edu. Installment payments are available through The College Green Payment Plan via the Kilgore College website only. A credit card or bank account number is required for payments made via the web.


Registration

Prior to registration, the student must meet the appropriate admissions requirements explained in the section "Admissions". Students must also resolve any holds that block registration. Registration for classes is necessary for every semester of attendance at KC. Official days of advisement and registration periods are specified in the "Official College Calendar". Consult the KC website for classes offered and registration information. Registration is complete when the student receives a validated receipt from the Business Office. Additional information regarding registration is available from the Office of Admissions and Registrar at (903) 983-8606 or online at www.kilgore.edu.


Importance of Submitting Correct Data

Students are required to verify the accuracy of all personal data in registration materials. The college assumes no responsibility for students' credits when students use different names or variations of names during registration. 


Types of Registration:

Web Registration:

Kilgore College provides web registration to eligible students via the myKC web portal. See the online Registration Guide for eligibility requirements and web registration details. Students enrolling for the first time, students on academic probation, students with any type of hold, dual credit students, and students with developmental requirements may not web register. Transfer students who have no developmental requirements may web register. Certain academic programs may require face-to-face registration.

Current, returning, and new students are encouraged to register for classes as early as possible. See the online Registration Guide for details. Registering early offers:

  • Largest selection of course sections and available times.
  • Tuition and fee payment deferral to a later deadline.

Late Registration

  • Scheduled the week prior to the start of classes.
  • See online Registration Guide for registration information, times and dates.

Registration for Continuing Education 

Community members wanting noncredit course enrollment information may contact

  • Office of Continuing Education, Kilgore (903) 983-8661 or
  • Office of Continuing Education, KC-Longview (903) 983-8281 or (903) 753-2642.

Adding Courses/Changing Schedules

  • Add/change course through the first two class days of spring/fall semesters - includes first night of a class and first day of summer terms (see dates in the online Registration Guide).
  • Additional tuition/fees are due when the schedule is changed.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES 

This section contains information about the general academic policies of the college. Students should review this information carefully when they enroll for courses at KC.


Academic Honesty Statement 

It is the responsibility of students and faculty to help maintain scholastic integrity at the college by refusing to participate in or tolerate scholastic dishonesty. Plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty undermine the very purpose of the college and diminish the value of an education. Specific sanctions for academic dishonesty are outlined in the Kilgore College Student Handbook available in the Office of the Vice President of Student Development, located in the Devall Student Center. Phone (903) 983-8189.


Student Records 

Access (FERPA):

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records.

These rights include:

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the college receives a request for access.
  2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy rights under FERPA.
  3. The right to provide written consent before the college discloses personally identifiable information from the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. 
  4. Students seeking to exercise these rights should contact the Kilgore College Office of Admissions and Registrar, located in the Devall Student Center to complete and submit the appropriate forms.
  5. The college discloses education records without a student's prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); contractors, volunteers, and other non-employees performing institutional services and functions; a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. Certain offices at Kilgore College utilize student assistants in fulfilling professional responsibilities.  These individuals receive FERPA training and are classified as school officials when working with student records. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the college. Upon request, the college also discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll, is currently enrolled, or has been enrolled, as long as the records relate to the student's enrollment or transfer to the other school.

In compliance with FERPA, the college may release to the general public the following types of directory information without the written consent of the student:

  1. Name, address, telephone listings
  2. Date, place of birth
  3. Enrollment status, such as full-time/part-time
  4. Classification
  5. Major field of study
  6. Dates of attendance, awards received, degrees earned
  7. Most recent previous educational institution attended
  8. Weight and height of members of athletic teams
  9. Participation in officially recognized activities and sports
  10. Photographs and other electronic images including audio and video

By making a written request to the Office of Admissions and Registrar, the student may request that this information be withheld from the public. Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the college to comply with the requirements of FERPA. Complaints should be addressed to:

Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, D.C. 20202-5920

As of January 3, 2012, the U.S. Department of Education's FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which your education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records - including your Social Security Number, grades, or other private information - may be accessed without your consent. First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state and local education authorities ("Federal and State Authorities") may allow access to your records and PII without your consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any program that is "principally engaged in the provision of education," such as early childhood education and job training, as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution. Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to your education records and PII without your consent to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when we object to or do not request such research. Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from the entities that they authorize to receive your PII, but the Authorities need not maintain direct control over such entities. In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile, permanently retain, and share without your consent PII from your education records, and they may track your participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information about you that they obtain from other Federal or State data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems.

Transcript Regulations:

The Office of Admissions and Registrar issues official transcripts according to the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. This office will not honor a transcript request without the student's signature unless the transcript is being sent to another college for educational purposes. During peak periods such as during commencement and registration, the student should make transcript requests three weeks in advance. Receiving institutions require official transcripts from each institution a student has attended, even though transfer work may be posted to the KC transcript for reference. The student must clear all financial and other obligations to the college before the college will release the transcript.

Kilgore College Permanent Record:

Each Kilgore College student enrolled in credit courses beyond the official reporting date of any semester or term establishes a permanent record. A student's permanent record may include personal and academic information. Student permanent records are housed in the central computer system and in other permanent storage. The central computer system staff is responsible for the technological maintenance of permanent records, and the Office of Admissions and Registrar staff is responsible for updates to student permanent records.

A transcript (copy) of the permanent record may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Registrar at no charge.

Reinstatement Policy:

After a semester begins and under certain circumstances, a formerly enrolled student may be reinstated in their semester courses if the student was dropped in error or for not meeting expected deadlines or policies.  Reinstatement is not automatic, and a student seeking reinstatement should visit the Office of Admissions and Registrar to request reinstatement. A Petition for Reinstatement form and applicable supporting documentation will be required. Penalties and fees may apply.


Student Classification:

The student's classification is based on cumulative hours passed (not counting hours currently enrolled.) A student is classified as follows:

  • Freshman: Student who has 0-29 semester credit hours
  • Sophomore: Student who has 30-72 semester credit hours
  • Unclassified: Student who has more than 72 semester credit hours
  • Part-time: Student enrolled in fewer than 12 semester hours in any semester
  • Full-time: Student who is enrolled in a minimum of 12 semester hours in any semester

Note 1: A student’s term grade point average and full-time/part-time status are determined by the number of hours registered in a given term and may include developmental hours.  The student’s cumulative/career grade point average, hours earned, and classification are calculated excluding developmental hours.

Note 2: In order to meet Federal Student Loans Program Enrollment Certification requirements at KC, any student who is enrolled in a major which has a major code of RNSA or RNSB and who is enrolled for 6-11 hours, which must include courses entitled RNSG and which relate to clinical experience as defined by the Dean of Math, Science and Health Science, will be considered as a full-time student at KC. This policy applies only to those students who have federal student loans and is only for enrollment certification for student loan requirement. The policy does not apply to any other federal or state grant program at KC.


Course Credit 

Course credit is based on the semester hour unit. A typical lecture course that meets three times each week during a long semester carries three semester hours of credit while a course that meets more hours during the week or has an assigned laboratory may carry four or more hours of credit. The second digit in the course number indicates the number of semester hours that a student is granted for successfully completing that course.


Course Transfer: 

Transfer of Credit to KC:

Transfer of credit from another college or university to KC involves consideration of accreditation, comparability of course work, and applicability of that course work to a KC degree program. Transfer work for students who already have a college degree, or for those not seeking a degree, may not be evaluated. The college will receive transfer credit from another college or university according to the following guidelines:

  1. Credit for courses in which a passing grade ("D" or better) has been earned may be transferred to KC from colleges and universities accredited through recognized regional accrediting associations. It is not the policy of the college to transfer credits from any institution not so accredited without documentation that the coursework adequately addresses the student learning outcomes of the comparable KC course and that the instructor meets SACSCOC qualifications for teaching the applicable course(s).
  2. The college will consider course work completed at colleges and universities outside the U.S. on an individual basis.
  3. A student attempting to transfer credit from another accredited college or university must furnish Kilgore College with an official transcript(s) prior to the end of the student's first academic term. Kilgore College students completing courses as a transient student at another institution should provide official transcripts immediately upon completion of the course. Upon receipt of the official transcript(s), the Office of Admissions and Registrar will complete a course-by-course evaluation as needed no later than the end of the first academic term in which the student is enrolled. Students may view transfer coursework posted to their KC transcript in myKC. If an official transcript(s) is not received as stated above, the student will not be allowed to enroll in additional semesters until the information is provided.
  4. Transferred coursework may be posted to a KC student transcript for reference, but transfer grades are not included in the KC grade point average calculation.
  5. Kilgore College accepts credit earned at other institutions by advanced placement examinations or through experiential learning under the same conditions as credit earned by traditional course work.

Transfer of Credit from KC to Other Colleges and Universities

Transfer of credit from KC to other colleges and universities is usually accomplished without difficulty. It is the responsibility of the student, however, to determine prior to registration if the courses will transfer. Transfer of specific courses normally depends upon the applicability of the completed work toward a degree plan specified by the receiving college or university. Therefore, the student should plan any KC program of study to parallel, as nearly as possible, the requirements of the program at the college or university to which the student plans to transfer. A library of catalogs of most colleges and universities to which students might want to transfer is available in the counseling center. The counseling center maintains course articulation on conversion charts for many Texas institutions of higher learning. These cross-reference charts enable the students to determine the course equivalent at the college or university to which they plan to transfer. Counseling assistance is available to students who want more information about transferring to another college or university.

Note: Senior institutions treat transfer grades in various ways. While the grade "C" is usually considered minimal for transfer, the specific average required varies with the admissions policy established by the receiving institution. Some colleges and universities accept "D" grades if the student's overall grade average is "C" or better. Certain institutions require that the student repeat any course in which the student earned a "D" grade; some receive the "I" as an "F" grade.

Guarantee for Transfer Credit

If any student completes the KC Core Curriculum, any Texas college or university is required to accept it in total. KC guarantees to its Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Arts in Teaching graduates and to other students, who have met the requirements of a 62/63-credit-hour transfer plan, the transferability of course credits to those Texas colleges or universities that cooperate in the development of KC Articulation Guides. If such courses are rejected by the college or the university, KC offers the student tuition-free alternative courses which are acceptable to the college or university.

Special conditions that apply to the guarantee are as follows:

  1. Courses must be identified by the receiving university as transferable and applicable in Kilgore College Articulation Guides dated 1991-92 or later.
  2. The catalog of the receiving institution states the total number of credits accepted in transfer, grades required, relevant grade point average, and duration of transferability.
  3. The guarantee applies to courses included in a written transfer plan that must be filed with KC. The plan includes the institution to which the student will transfer the baccalaureate major, degree sought, and the date such a decision was made.

Transfer Dispute Resolution

Transfer disputes may arise when a lower-division course is not accepted for credit by a Texas institution of higher education. To qualify as a dispute the course(s) in question must be offered by the institution denying the credit (receiving institution), or in the case of upper-level institutions, must be published in a lower-division course accepted for fulfilling lower-level requirements. For community colleges, the course(s) must be listed in the Lower-Division Academic Course Guide Manual, and be offered at the receiving institution. Additionally, the sending institution must challenge the receiving institution's denial of credit.

The following procedures shall be followed by public institutions of higher education in the resolution of credit transfer disputes involving lower division courses:

  1. If an institution of higher education does not accept course credit earned by a student at another institution of higher education, the receiving institution shall give written notice to the student and to the sending institution that transfer of the course credit is denied.
  2. The two institutions and the student shall attempt to resolve the transfer of the course credit in accordance with Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board rules and/or its guidelines.
  3. If the transfer dispute is not resolved to the satisfaction of the student or the sending institution within 45 days after the date the student received written notice of denial, the institution whose credit is denied for transfer shall notify the Commissioner of Higher Education of the denial.
  4. The Commissioner of Higher Education or the Commissioner's designee shall make the final determination about the dispute concerning the transfer of course credit and give written notice of the determination to the involved student and institutions. Problems that occur during the transfer process will not always be categorized as disputes, and will not follow dispute procedures and guidelines. Problems are clearly within the jurisdiction of the receiving institution. 

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Non-Traditional Credit 

Kilgore College (KC) recognizes and values knowledge and skills gained in many ways.   Credit may be awarded for noncredit coursework, by examination, or through experiential learning. The Kilgore College Academic Credit for Noncredit Coursework, Examination, and Experiential Learning Policy is available on the college’s Policy and Procedures webpage. Students admitted to KC may earn academic credit for learning achieved through experiences that they have completed before enrolling. The college assesses a fee for administering examinations and a fee for posting to the transcript credit awarded.

Credit for Experience

KC awards credit for experiential learning when students demonstrate that they have achieved the student learning outcomes of a designated workforce education course by way of a departmental exam or appropriate industry recognized credential.  Credit may be awarded toward completion of an Associate of Applied Science degree or a Certificate of Completion for learning achieved through experiences outside typical educational settings when it is consistent with the educational objectives of the student, the requirements of the curriculum, and the policy on granting credit for experiential learning. 

  1. Virtually all credit granted for experience must be validated through a departmental examination. To inquire if an appropriate departmental examination is available, students seeking credit for experience should contact the appropriate division dean. Appropriate documentation of skills and/or knowledge must accompany the petition to take the departmental examination. In exceptional cases, as determined by the division dean, where credit is awarded without validation through a departmental examination, the request for credit must be supported by official and verifiable documentation. Credit may be awarded for military training based on American Council on Education (ACE) recommendations, as recorded on military transcripts. ACE-recommended credit must be equivalent to existing KC courses. 
  2. A minimum of 15 semester hours in residence must be completed before credit is posted and a degree is awarded. For certificates, credit may be posted when at least three semester hours have been earned in residence; however, in all cases, a minimum of 25% of the credits in the award must be earned through KC course instruction.    
  3. A maximum of 24 semester credit hours may be awarded toward the Associate of Applied Science degree while a maximum of 15 credit hours may be applied toward a Certificate of Completion.  
  4. The symbol "CR" (credit), rather than a grade, will be posted to a transcript. A grade equivalent of "C" or higher must be earned on an examination in order for "CR" to be awarded. Unsuccessful attempts are not recorded on transcripts. 
  5. Fees for taking departmental exams and for posting credits to KC transcripts are listed in the KC Catalog.

KC awards credit for appropriate documented experience in the following instances:

  1. Military training and experience, including basic training
  2. Selected work experience in business and industry
  3. Professional certificates, licenses, and credentials 
  4. Learning achieved through proprietary schools, apprenticeship, or other intra-company training.
  5. Learning achieved through noncredit workshops, seminars, and conferences

Credit for Experience-Kinesiology

Kilgore College may award two semester credit hours of Kinesiology credit based upon completion of military basic training. Documentation of the training must be received before credit will be awarded.

Credit by Examination and for Advanced Placement

KC awards credit by exam [e.g., College Board Advanced Placement, College Board College Level Examination Program, and International Baccalaureate (IB)] for designated courses based on commonly recognized standards.

  1. Except where noted below, credit by examination and advanced placement are available both to incoming students and students currently enrolled.
  2. KC will award credit only after students enroll at the College and earn 15 credit hours through KC instruction. This restriction does not apply to the IB program.
  3. Scores earned on national examinations should be sent to KC. Students must contact the Office of Admissions and Registrar to have credit posted on transcripts.
  4. The symbol "CR" (credit), rather than a grade, will be posted to a transcript.
  5. KC will not award credit by examination for courses in which a student is currently enrolled, for courses which a student has previously failed, or for courses which are prerequisites to courses for which the student has already earned credit.
  6. A student may earn a maximum of 24 credit hours through credit by examination. 
  7. Credit by examination or advanced placement is not applicable toward determination of scholastic standing or academic honors. Likewise, credit hours earned through credit by examination or advanced placement will not satisfy requirements for minimum hours in residence that the student must earn at KC for a certificate of completion or a degree.
  8. Colleges and universities to which KC students plan to transfer determine their own policies for the transfer of credits awarded through examinations. KC urges students to verify transferability and applicability of such course credits with the colleges or universities to which they intend to transfer.
  9. Fees for posting credits to KC transcripts are listed in the KC Catalog.

Credit-By-Examination Options

College Board Advanced Placement Examinations

Potential college freshmen may earn course credit through the College Board Advanced Placement Program examinations offered at selected high schools in May of each year. Students enrolled in Advanced Placement (AP) courses or honors courses qualify for these examinations. Students who take these examinations should have the College Board forward their scores to the Office of Admissions and Registrar, Kilgore College, 1100 Broadway, Kilgore, TX 75662-3204. Students will not receive test results from College Board until mid-July. AP examinations for which students may earn KC course credit include the following:

AP Exam

Minimum Accepted Score

KC Course

Credit Hours Granted

American History

3

HIST 1301 or 1302

3

American Govt. & Politics

3

GOVT 2305

3

Biology

3

BIOL 1406 or 1408

4

Calculus AB

3

MATH 2413

4

Calculus BC

3

MATH 2413 & 2414

8

Chemistry

3

CHEM 1406 or 1411

4

Computer Science A

3

COSC 1336

3

English Lang. & Comp.

3

ENGL 1301

3*

English Lit. & Comp.

3

ENGL 1302

3*

English Lit. & Comp.

4

ENGL 1301 & 1302

6*

Foreign Language

3

SPAN 1311

3

Foreign Language

4

SPAN 1411 & 1412

6

Macroeconomics

3

ECON 2301

3

Microeconomics

3

ECON 2302

3

Physics B

3

PHYS 2425

4

Statistics

3

MATH 1342

3

* The student must qualify on both the objective and essay parts of the English exam.


College Level Examination (CLEP) Program

The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) is designed primarily to evaluate non-traditional, college-level education such as independent study or correspondence work. Students may utilize CLEP, however, as a means to demonstrate achievement in more traditional educational settings. Although KC does not accept scores for CLEP general examinations, the college may grant credit for specified CLEP subject examinations. For test dates and deadlines, call the Testing Center at (903) 983-8215 or e-mail testing@kilgore.edu. Students may obtain registration forms from the KC Testing Center, or at www.kilgore.edu/testing. The following are CLEP subject examinations for which a student may earn KC credit:

CLEP Subject Exam

Minimum Score

KC Course

Credit Hrs.

American Government

50

GOVT 2305

3

Analyzing & Interpreting Lit*

50

ENGL 1302

3

Biology, General

53

BIOL 1408

4

Business Law, Intro.

51

BUSI 2301

3

Calculus

50

MATH 2413

4

Chemistry

50

CHEM 1411

4

College Algebra

50

MATH 1314

3

Financial Accounting

50

ACCT 2401

4

College Comp. Modular

50

ENGL 1301

3

Human Growth & Dev

50

PSYC 2314

3

Information Systems

50

ITSC 1301

3

Macroeconomics, Principles

50

ECON 2301

3

Management Principles

50

BMGT 1303

3

Marketing, Principles

50

MRKG 1311

3

Microeconomics, Principles

50

ECON 2302

3

Pre-Calculus

50

MATH 2412

4

Psychology, Intro.

50

PSYC 2301

3

Sociology, Intro

50

SOCI 1301

3

Spanish Language - Level 1

50

SPAN 1411

3

Spanish Language - Level 2

53

SPAN 1412

6

U.S History I   

50

HIST 1301

3

U.S. History II

50

HIST 1302

3

Western Civilization I 

50

HIST 2311

3

Western Civilization II

50

HIST 2312

3

* The student must qualify on both the objective and essay parts of the English exam to receive credit. Students will not receive credit for courses previously or currently enrolled in. 

Departmental Examinations

For courses in some workforce education programs, students may earn credit by submitting a written request to the division dean for a departmental examination. Appropriate evaluation documentation of skills and/or knowledge must accompany the petition to take the departmental examination. The college will assess a fee for the examination and a fee for posting a grade to the transcript (see chart below). Some of the courses for which students may earn credit by departmental examination are the following: 

  • ARTC 1325
  • ARTC 2317
  • AUMT 1305
  • AUMT 2425
  • BMGT 1303
  • BUSG 1371
  • CETT 1325
  • CETT 1409
  • COMP SCI (ITXX)
  • DFTG 1305
  • DFTG 1309
  • DFTG 1333
  • METL 1313
  • MRKG 1311
  • OSHT 1401
  • PHTC 1311
  • POFT 1329
  • WLDG 1428
  • WLDG 1457

Advanced Placement Options:

Advanced Placement in Health Occupations Programs

For studies completed in accredited health and medical programs at other institutions, including hospitals, the college may award credit which will apply toward completion of the Associate of Applied Science degree. Interested persons may apply to the appropriate program director by

presenting documented and verifiable evidence of current certification by the controlling registry or certifying agency. The applicant must also have worked in his or her field full time a minimum of two years in the past five years. In some instances, it may be necessary that the applicant also satisfactorily pass a challenge examination administered by the college.  The number of equivalent credits awarded may not exceed the total number of credits required in the major area of the Associate of Applied Science degree being sought. The college will not post the credit hours granted to a transcript until the student has completed at least 15 semester hours of instruction at KC.

Advanced Placement Without Credit

A student who wishes to enroll in an advanced course for which there is no credit by examination or departmental examination for the prerequisite courses may do so with the consent of the appropriate dean. The student must demonstrate or present documentation that he or she possesses the academic background and/or experiences to justify the advanced placement. The student will not receive credit for the prerequisite courses and no fees apply. 

Non-Traditional Credit:

  • Credit by College Board Advanced Placement: $25 posting fee
  • CLEP credit: Test Fee + $20 proctor fee + $25 posting fee
  • Credit by Departmental Exam: In-District Tuition & Fees
  • Advanced Placement in Health Occupations: $25 posting fee

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Kilgore College Policy for Awarding International Baccalaureate Diploma Credit 

Kilgore College will grant a minimum of 24 semester credit hours (SCH) to any new student who earns the International Baccalaureate Diploma and has scores of at least 4 on all subjects. The maximum number of semester credit hours that will be awarded is 30. KC may grant fewer than 24 SCH if the student earned the IB Diploma and scored less than 4 on any IB examination. Applicants with the IB diploma must provide a completed IB transcript to the Office of Admissions and Registrar prior to enrolling in order to receive credit.

IB Subject

Standard Level Score

Higher Level Score

KC Course

Credit Hours

English A Literature

5

4
5+

ENGL 1301 or 1302
ENGL 1301, 1302

3
6

Business & Management
Economics
Geography
History

Philosophy
Psychology

Social & Cultural
Anthropology

5
5
5
5

5
5
 

 

5

4
4
4
4
5+
4
4
5+

4
5+

BUSI 1301
ECON 2301, 2302
GEOG 1303
HIST 1301 or 1302
HIST 1301, 1302
PHIL 1301
PSYC 2301
PSYC 2301, 2314

ANTH 2301 or 2351
ANTH 2301, 2351

3
6
3
3
6
3
3
6

3
6

Biology

Chemistry (must pass lab for credit)

Chemistry (must pass lab for credit)

Physics

4

5


5
5

6

4

BIOL 1408
BIOL 1406
CHEM 1405

CHEM 1411

PHYS 1401, 1402

4
4
4

4

8

Mathematics (HL only
Computer Science


5

4
4

MATH 2413
BCIS 1305

4
3

Visual Arts
Music
Theatre Arts

5
5
5

4
4
4

ART 1301
MUSI 1306
DRAM 1310

3
3
3

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Course Numbering System:

Courses offered follow a four-digit numbering system. The first digit indicates the state-designated academic level of the course [0 = institutional credit (developmental), 1 = freshman, 2 = sophomore] and, the second digit reflects the semester-credit-hour value of the course. The third and fourth digits indicate sequences.

KC participates in the Texas Common Course Numbering System (TCCNS). Participating institutions have signed agreements accepting a standard numbering system for commonly transferred academic courses. KC advises students to seek assistance through the Counseling Center, located in the Devall Student Center, when planning transfer course work. For specific information on course equivalencies and degree requirements, students should contact the colleges or universities to which they plan to transfer. 


Prerequisites 

Each student is responsible for determining prerequisites for a course prior to enrollment. Prerequisites are listed in each course description in the college catalog.

Scholastic Load

During the long semester, the normal course load is five academic courses or 15 to 17 semester hours. In addition to the normal load, students may take up to four semester hours in music-Applied (MUAP) and kinesiology (KINE). When students earn a 2.25 grade point average (GPA) or greater during a long semester or summer term, they qualify to take a total of 6 courses or 18-20 semester hours during the following semester. The maximum course load during a summer term is 8 semester hours for each term. Students may enroll in only one mini-term course at a time. Students who are employed or who have family responsibilities are cautioned to consider carefully the course load they take. The student who is overly extended is likely to have scholastic difficulties. Students should contact the dean for their major to request permission to add hours above the maximum scholastic load.


Grades For Coursework

Grade Reports: Grades are available at the end of each term online through the myKC student web portal (https://mykc.kilgore.edu/ICS ).

Final Examinations

At the end of the semester in each course, there will be a comprehensive final examination, not to exceed two hours in length, at the time specified in the final examination schedule. Final examinations of flex classes will be administered on the last day of the class. Students are not permitted to take final examinations earlier than the time specified in the final examination schedule. A student who must be absent from a final examination should petition the instructor for permission to take the examination at a later date. The student will receive a grade of "I" (incomplete) for the course until the student takes the postponed examination. The student must take the examination no later than the end of the sixth week following the first class day of the next long semester or receive a grade of "F" for the examination. A student absent without the instructor's approval may receive an "F" on the examination unless there are extenuating circumstances as deemed by the instructor.

Grade Symbols

The college indicates grades by the following symbols:

  • A: (90-100) excellent
  • B: (80-89) above average
  • C: (70-79) fair or average
  • D: (60-69) lowest passing mark
  • F: (0-59) failing
  • I*: Incomplete
  • IP**: Incomplete Passing
  • W: Withdrawn from course
  • CR: Credit by examination and advanced placement

Certain health science programs have grading scales that differ from the above. Exceptions are explained on the appropriate program in Occupational Courses of Study.

* The instructor may assign an "I" because of student illness or other unavoidable circumstances. The student must complete work no later than the end of the sixth week following the first class day of the next long semester. To be eligible for this grade, the student must have essentially completed the course, and the work remaining should be of such nature as not to require class attendance. It is the responsibility of the student to arrange with the instructor for completion of the course.

** An "IP" is only for modular math courses, MATH 0307, and MATH 0309. The student re-registers for the course and receives a grade when the minimum passing score is attained. The "IP" can never revert to an "F" nor be used in computing grade point averages or academic status.

Computation of the Grade Point Average (GPA)

KC utilizes the four-point system. The semester GPA is the total number of grade points earned divided by the number of semester hours attempted including developmental hours. The cumulative GPA is calculated by dividing the total number of grade points earned by the total number of semester hours attempted by the student in all terms excluding developmental hours. Semester grade symbols have the following values: A=4 points; B=3 points; C=2 points; D=1 point; F or I=0. W and IP are not included in the calculations of the GPA.

Grade Change Procedure

An individual course grade may be changed when the faculty member certifies in writing that an error was made in computing the original grade or when a student has successfully completed work to satisfy a grade of incomplete (I). The appropriate dean and Vice President of Instruction must approve the grade change. An instructor cannot change a student's grade after one calendar year from the date the grade was assigned.

Grade Appeals

A student who wishes to protest a grade earned in a course should first discuss the grade with the instructor. If no resolution is reached, the student may appeal to the appropriate dean. If no satisfactory conclusion can be reached at this level, the student may appeal to the Vice President of Instruction whose decision is final. A student has one calendar year from the date the grade was assigned to appeal the grade.

Repeating Courses

If a student repeats a course, all grades remain on the transcript, but the college counts only the highest grade in determining the overall grade point average (GPA). The college cautions the student, however, that other colleges may not follow this practice. A student planning to transfer to another college or university should check with the Admissions Office at that institution to determine the course repetition policy at the receiving institution.

Academic Honors

The college recognizes students with high academic achievement in the following ways:

Dean's List

The dean's list is published soon after the close of each long semester. To make this list, the student must complete 12 or more semester hours of non-developmental coursework and must have earned a grade point average (GPA) at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale for that semester.

President’s List

The president’s list is published soon after the close of each long semester. To make this list, the student must complete 12 or more semester hours of non-developmental coursework and must have earned a grade point average (GPA) of 4.0 on a 4.0 scale for that semester.

Phi Theta Kappa

Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society for community colleges. The local chapter, Gamma Omicron, was established the year after KC was founded. Members are chosen on the basis of scholarship, leadership, and citizenship. Membership is by invitation only. To be eligible for membership in the local chapter, a student (a) must be regularly enrolled in the college and be in good standing, (b) take no less than 12 hours in the long semester preceding initiation OR accumulate a minimum of 12 hours over at least two full semesters as a part-time student, and (c) have no less than a 3.50 grade point average (GPA) based on a 4.00 scale in those hours. Only coursework taken at KC applies. (Developmental coursework does not apply.) To maintain active membership, a student must remain in good standing and maintain a GPA of not less than 3.25 for coursework completed at KC. 

Graduation with Honors

Graduates with a GPA of 3.50 or above are considered to be graduating with honors. To qualify for graduation with honors, a student must earn at KC 50 percent of the hours that apply to graduation. For determining honor graduates, the Office of Admissions and Registrar will compute the grade point average (GPA) for the student's entire Kilgore college record. Transfer grades are not included in the GPA calculation. Honors graduation is designated as follows:

  • 4.00 and all hours earned at KC: Presidential Honors
  • 4.00: Graduation with highest honors
  • 3.75 - 3.99: Graduation with high honors
  • 3.50 - 3.74: Graduation with honors

This designation is noted on the student's transcript and diploma.


Course and Enrollment Withdrawal:

Course Drop Limits

Students entering college for the first time in Fall 2007 or after are subject to Senate Bill 1231 passed by the Texas Legislature in May 2007. This law limits students to a total of six drops in their entire college career in Texas public institutions, unless the courses were dropped in order to withdraw from school or for certain approved reasons. To be counted toward the total, drops must appear on the transcript and be signified by a grade of "W". Students are required to select a primary reason for withdrawing from a course at the time the course is dropped.  The following are approved reasons that do not count in the drop total:

  • personal illness
  • care of sick, injured, or needy person
  • death of family member or close friend
  • called to active military duty
  • family member or close friend called to active military duty
  • change in work schedule
  • transportation problems
  • personal/family obligations
  • withdrawal from school
  • administratively withdrawn by instructor or other college personnel

Drops from the following courses will not count in the drop total:

  • courses taken prior to high school graduation
  • developmental courses
  • lab/clinical courses that must be taken in conjunction with a lecture
  • all courses in the following departments: College Success Strategies (COLS, ORIE); Religion (RELI)

Students wishing to dispute the drop total must do so by contacting the Office of Admissions and Registrar. If the dispute cannot be resolved between the student and the Office of Admissions and Registrar, the student should follow the grievance procedure for non-instructional matters as defined in the Student Handbook. Reasons for dropping courses may not be changed after one calendar year from the end of the semester in which the courses were dropped.

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Drops and Withdrawals:

  • A Student-Initiated Drop is an official action whereby a student informs the Office of Admissions and Registrar that the student will cease attending a class in which he or she is enrolled while remaining in at least one other course.
  • A Faculty-Initiated Drop is an official action whereby the faculty member for a particular course informs the Office of Admissions and Registrar that the student has ceased attending a class in which the student is enrolled.
  • Withdrawing from the college is an official action whereby a student informs the Counseling Center and the Office of Admissions and Registrar that the student will cease attending all classes in which he or she enrolled.
  • Course Drop Procedures:
  1. Visit the Office of Admissions and Registrar or the KC-Longview office to request that the course be dropped. The Office of Admissions and Registrar will notify the instructor that the student has been dropped.
  2. The instructor may drop a student who ceases to attend class if the student does not formally withdraw in the Office of Admissions and Registrar.
  3. It is the student's responsibility to drop a course by the stated deadline to ensure a grade of 'W'.

Enrollment Withdrawal Procedures

  1. Obtain an official withdrawal form at the Office of Admissions and Registrar or the KC-Longview office.
  2. Complete an official withdrawal form by meeting with the offices indicated on the form.
  3. Return the completed withdrawal form to the Office of Admissions and Registrar or the KC-Longview office.
  4. Meet all obligations to the college before the Office of Admissions and Registrar can complete the withdrawal process and/or issue a transcript.
  5. It is the student's responsibility to withdraw by the stated deadline to ensure a grade of 'W'.

"W" Grade Assigned for Dropping a Course or Withdrawing from Enrollment.

  • All course drops and/or withdrawals from enrollment, whether instructor or student initiated, shall result in a "W" if processed after the Official Reporting Date (ORD).
  • Documentation of all drops and withdrawals must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Registrar by the end of business on each deadline date for a "W" to be assigned.
  • It is the student's responsibility to drop classes and/or withdraw from enrollment by the deadline to receive a "W". After that time, a performance grade will be given in each course in which the student is enrolled (A, B, C, D, F, or IP for certain courses.)

Administrative Withdrawal of a Student 

Kilgore College reserves the right to withdraw a student from one or more classes if, in the judgment of college officials, such action is deemed to be in the interest of the student and/or the college. Examples of some reasons for administrative withdrawal are failure to pay tuition and fees, failure to provide accurate information or admission credentials, failure to remove "holds" in a timely manner, excessive absences or unacceptable student behavior.

Attendance Policy

Kilgore College expects punctuality and regular class attendance. An absence is defined as a student's not being in class for any reason. An instructor may drop students when their lack of attendance prohibits them from meeting the course Student Learning Outcomes or when students accumulate excessive absences. "Excessive absences" is defined as the equivalent of two weeks instruction in a 16-week semester or at least 12.5% of the total hours of instruction in any term. Some workforce programs may have more stringent attendance requirements due to applicable external requirements and/or competencies; therefore, students in workforce programs should check with their instructor regarding the specific number of absences allowed. Students may be dropped for nonattendance per Federal Financial Aid requirements even if the absences constitute less than 12.5% of the course.

Religious Day Absence

In accordance with Texas Education Code 51.911, a student may request and be granted an absence from classes on a religious holy day provided the student follows college procedures for seeking such authorization. It is the student's responsibility to make satisfactory arrangements with instructors prior to the absence for completing makeup work. The procedure governing an absence on a religious holy day is outlined in the Kilgore College Student Handbook.


Policy for Make-Up Work 

Effective communication between students and their instructor is essential. Students are responsible for initiating any make up work regardless of the cause of the absence. Students absent on official college business are entitled to make up any and all missed work without any penalty attached. However, students should notify their instructors in advance of the absence and should schedule any make-up assignments before the absence. If the student does not submit makeup work by the prearranged time, the student forfeits the right for further make-up of that assignment. For a student whose absence is not official college business, the individual instructor will judge if the student is eligible to make up work. In all cases, the instructor will determine the time for making up work and the nature of the make-up work. Whenever possible, students should discuss their impending absence with the instructor and schedule the make-up work prior to the absence.

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Academic Probation and Suspension 

Students must meet academic standards in work completed at KC. Students who fail to meet those standards are placed on scholastic probation or scholastic suspension. Only grades earned at KC are used to determine probation or suspension status.

Scholastic Probation

A conditional permission for a student to remain in college. That status will be applied to any student who:

  • has completed at least one semester, and has attempted at least 12 cumulative semester hours and earns less than a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA);
  • or returns from scholastic suspension after "stopping out" or not attending for at least one 16-week (long) semester;
  • or is on scholastic suspension and attends summer school, earning 6 or more hours with a 1.75 cumulative GPA or a 2.5 summer GPA.

A student may remain in school on probation as long as the cumulative GPA is at least 1.75 or a long semester GPA is at least 2.0. Students on scholastic probation must consult a counselor or faculty advisor before registering for another semester. Students on probation are not allowed to web register.
A student is removed from probation when the student earns a 2.0 cumulative GPA or better.

Note: A grade of "I" is calculated as an "F" until the grade is changed to a higher grade.

Scholastic Suspension

The loss of the conditional permission of a student on scholastic probation to remain in college. Suspension is for one 16-week semester and occurs when a student on probation fails to earn at least a 1.75 cumulative grade point average (GPA) or a 2.0 GPA in the most recent 16-week semester. A student on scholastic suspension may:

•enroll in the next long semester under conditions prescribed by the Director of Counseling and Testing or designee; or Dean of KC-Longview or designee, if student is enrolled at that location;

or attend summer school. Students earning 6 or more semester hours in the summer with a cumulative GPA of at least 1.75 or a summer GPA of 2.5 will continue on probation.

Readmission Following Scholastic Suspension

A student may be readmitted on continued scholastic probation after one long semester of scholastic suspension. Students returning from suspension must complete a Reactivation form with the Office of Admissions and Registrar. Students must also consult with the Director of Counseling and Testing or a designee or the Dean of KC-Longview or designee before registering for classes. Students on suspension are not allowed to web register.

Academic Appeals

An appeal involves the student’s formal request for review of a decision made by a college employee. The granting of an appeal is not automatic; instead, appeals are intended to ensure that proper procedures have been followed and all available information has been considered. To fulfill the intent of the Kilgore College appeal process, appeals must have standing to be considered. To have standing, students must demonstrate that either: appropriate policy or procedure was not followed when the decision being appealed was made OR that there is new information or evidence that was not available for consideration when the decision being appealed was made. Individuals serving as an appellate officer may:

  1. Uphold the original decision.
  2. Add to or increase the severity of the sanctions, conditions, and/or restrictions.
  3. Modify or cancel the decision or action.
  4. Remand the decision or action with appropriate instructions to the previous authority.

Failure to file a written appeal within the stated timeframe will render the original decision final and conclusive.

Academic Complaint Grade Related

Under most circumstances, grade changes can be made only by the faculty of record. A student is entitled to a review and explanation of the grading process and the grade received. A grade is the primary prerogative and responsibility of the faculty member and any review as the result of a complaint is intended to ensure accuracy, fairness and adherence to Kilgore College policy. The following steps will be followed in an effort to reconcile a grade dispute:

Individual Assignment Grades

  1. The student will discuss an individual assignment grade dispute occurring during the semester with the faculty member involved within three (3) business days after the dispute arises.
  2. If the student and faculty member are unable to resolve the dispute, the student may present the case in writing on a student appeal form to the department chair/program director within three working days of the meeting with the faculty member.
  3. The department chair will render a decision and respond via email to the student’s official Kilgore College email account within three (3) business days upon receiving the student’s written appeal.
  4. If the grade dispute is not resolved, the student may appeal the decision to the appropriate dean by submitting the written appeal form within three (3) business days of the meeting with the department chair. The dean will respond via email to the student’s official Kilgore College email account within three (3) business days upon receiving the student's written appeal. The dean's decision is final and concludes the appeal process.

Semester Grades 

  1. Should a student desire to protest a semester grade, the student will discuss the dispute with the faculty member involved no later than the end of the sixth week following the first class day of the next long semester. Long semester is defined as the fall and spring semesters; therefore, a student protesting a spring or summer semester grade will have the first 6 weeks of the following fall semester to appeal.
  2. If the student and faculty member are unable to resolve the dispute, the student may present the case in writing on a student appeal form to the department chair/program director within three (3) working days of the meeting with the faculty member.
  3. The department chair will render a decision and respond via email to the student’s official Kilgore College email account within three (3) business days upon receiving the student’s written appeal.
  4. If the grade dispute is not resolved to the student's satisfaction, the student may appeal the decision to the appropriate dean by submitting the written appeal form within three (3) business days of the meeting with the department chair. The dean will respond via email to the student’s official Kilgore College email account within three (3) business days upon receiving the student's written appeal.
  5. In a semester grade dispute, the decision of the dean may be appealed to the Vice President of Instruction by submitting the appeal form to the VPI within three (3) business days upon receiving the dean’s decision. The Vice President of Instruction will notify the student of the decision which is final and concludes the appeal process.


NOTE: In the event that the instructional division dean is the instructor of record, the dispute will proceed to the Vice President of Instruction, following the procedures above. Should the Vice President of Instruction be the instructor of record, the dispute will proceed to the President of the College, following the procedures above.


Academic Complaints

Kilgore College is committed to resolving student concerns or dissatisfaction in the most expeditious and informal manner possible. As a result, students are expected to discuss their concerns or questions with the instructor, staff member, or office area in which they are experiencing dissatisfaction.  Most issues can be resolved at this level.

For situations that cannot be resolved informally, students have the right to file a formal, written complaint. A Kilgore College Complaint form is provided in Appendix C of the Kilgore College Student Handbook. In addition, copies of the complaint form are available in the Offices of the Vice President of Instruction, the Vice President of Student Development or any of the instructional division dean’s offices. The following steps will be followed in an effort to resolve academic complaints not related to disputed grades; e.g., removal from a class, dismissal or suspension from a department, denial of privileges associated with a class or department, classroom dishonesty, etc.

  1. Students should first take problems or questions to the instructor with whom they are experiencing the dissatisfaction as most problems can be resolved in this manner. This should occur within one week after the occurrence of the event or situation giving rise to the complaint.
  2. If the student and the instructor are unable to find a solution to the problem, the student may present the case in writing to the instructor’s department chair or program director within three working days of meeting with the instructor.  This is the point at which the Student Complaint form is utilized.
  3. The student will fill out the Student Complaint form completely, down to and including the student’s signature, and attach any appropriate written documentation to the form.
  4. The department chair/program director will investigate the situation with the instructor.  The department chair/program director will sign the complaint form at the time of reaching a decision.  They will also get the signature of the instructor to indicate that the matter has been discussed with them.  The department chair/program director will then communicate the decision to the student via email to the student’s official Kilgore College email address. [If the department chair/program director determines it is in the best interest of the student to conceal the student’s identity from the instructor on whom the complaint is filed, the department chair/program director will write a redacted account of the complaint on a separate document and present it to the instructor.  The instructor will sign the document, indicating that he/she has been informed.  The instructor may write a follow-up document, which will become part of the written complaint record.]
  5. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the department chair/program director, the student should present the complaint form with documentation to the appropriate instructional division dean within three working days of receiving a formal response from the department chair/program director.  At the time of rendering a formal response to the student, the instructional division dean will sign the form.
  6. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the instructional division dean, the student may present the formal student complaint form, with documentation, to the vice president of instruction within three working days of receiving a formal response from the dean.  The vice president of instruction will review the issue with regard to proper policy and procedure adherence.
  7. The vice president will communicate his decision via email to the student’s official Kilgore College email address. The decision of the vice president is final and concludes the complaint process.

NOTE: In the event that the instructional division dean is the instructor of record, the dispute will proceed to the Vice President of Instruction, following the procedures above. Should the Vice President of Instruction be the instructor of record, the dispute will proceed to the President of the College, following the procedures above.  In all instances of student complaints, efforts will be made to minimize the amount of time from one step to the next in the interest of resolving the issue as quickly as possible.

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Financial Aid:

The College makes every effort to assist students with documented financial need in locating sources to help with their educational expenses. Financial aid is available for students who, without assistance, would not be able to go to college. The family and student are expected to assume a major responsibility for tuition, fees and living expenses. The role financial aid plays in paying a student's higher education exists only when there is a difference between the student's resources and the cost of education, also known as unmet need.

Students are encouraged to become familiar with the KC Financial Aid Website and Financial Aid Portal at https://finaid.kilgore.edu/student/Logon.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fstudent%2 fPgHome.aspxand also at my KC (JICS) Portal at https://mykc.kilgore.edu/ICSAll financial aid information concerning required documents, status of award package, payment and aid deadlines, academic progress standing, and student acknowledgement of institutional and federal regulations will be delivered through the above institutional websites.

Financial counseling is offered on an individual basis to students who complete the annual FAFSA application at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Students are encouraged to call for an appointment for assistance

with filing the annual FAFSA application.  Various requirements for student eligibility for funding are as follows:

All general eligibility criteria for Title IV financial aid, per federal regulations

  • Application for admission to Kilgore College
  • Appropriate transcripts and documents as requested
  • Observance of stated deadlines
  • Satisfactory Academic Progress as a student in good standing or for continued aid eligibility

The following categories of funds are available for students who qualify:

  • Federal Sources of Financial Aid (TITLE IV)
    • Pell Grant
    • Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)
    • William D Ford Federal Direct Loan Program
    • Federal College Work Study(FWS)
    • Veterans' Benefits under Chapter 30, 31, 35, 1606, 1607, Tuition Assistance, My CCA and Post 911 Program
    • Veterans' Work Study Program
  • State of Texas Financial Aid
    • Texas Grant
    • TEOG Grant
    • Texas Public Education Grant
    • Hazlewood Exemptions
    • Texas Work Study Program
  • Institutional Funds
    • Departmental/institutional scholarships
    • Kilgore College Foundation scholarships
    • Tuition Exemptions
  • Outside Agency Funds
    • Miscellaneous agency scholarships and funds

Additional information, applications, and materials are available in the Financial Aid Office located in the Devall Student Center, phone (903) 983-8211 or (903) 983-8210, or at www.kilgore.edu 


Financial Aid - Veteran Affairs Benefits

Attendance Policy for VA Benefit-Eligible Students

Students using veterans’ benefits to attend Kilgore College will have attendance monitored until the time the student drops, graduates or completes the program.  Unsatisfactory attendance will be reported to the DVA even if the VA student has completed the required number of hours and no refund is due the student and/or refund sources.  Therefore, the attendance policy (20% of the total program and/or being absent five [5] consecutive days) will apply throughout the student’s stay in school.  All violations of the attendance policy will be reported to DVA on VA Form 22-1999b within 30 days at such time the student exceeds the allowed number of absences.

For clock hour programs, to prevent overpayment situations, the DVA recommends weekly certification of ACTUAL attendance on a weekly basis.

This signed form is only applicable for accredited and non-accredited non-college degree (NCD) program(s) or for non-accredited NCD program(s) offered at institutions of higher learning (IHL). The policy contained herein establishes the attendance policy for the veteran student(s) when there exists a less stringent policy or when there is no attendance policy defined in the institutions published catalog.

I have read, understand, and will comply with this policy for the veteran students certified for GI Bill benefits.

Military Tuition Assistance Refund Procedures

Kilgore College has a published refund policy for all students that follows regulations established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for Texas Community Colleges. That policy is published in the appropriate Registration Guide and is as follows:

Long Semester:

Refund Percentage: Class Days
100% Prior to first class day
70% First 15 class days
25% 16th through 20th class days
0% After 20th class day

Refunds related to flex terms, including summer terms, will follow the regular refund schedule printed in the Registration Guide and will be based on number of class days in the course or term.

For Students participating in the Military Tuition Assistance Program, refunds for withdrawals before completing 60% of the period of enrollment will be calculated based on a percentage of the calendar days completed divided by the total calendar days in the enrollment period.  Students withdrawing after 60% of the semester is completed are not eligible for a refund.  Once the refund amount is determined, the difference between the Tuition Assistance that was disbursed and the amount of Tuition Assistance that was earned will be returned to the appropriate military service, and not the student.

Long Semester, Course Specific Tuition Assistance Refund Schedule:

Number of days completed

__________________________________   =    percent earned X Tuition Assistance Paid

Total days of the period (start to end date)

Kilgore College will work with service members that stop attending due to a military service obligation in identifying solutions that will not result in a student debt for the returned portion. Military tuition assistance is awarded based on students completing the entire term for which the assistance was awarded. When a student withdraws, they may no longer be eligible for the full amount.

A student must officially drop or withdraw through the Office of Admissions and Registrar.  If a student officially withdraws from a course, the date of withdrawal will be used as the last date of attendance. If a scheduled course fails to materialize, the college will return 100% of tuition and fees, with the exception of late and matriculation fees.  A matriculation fee will be charged for students who enroll in courses and then completely withdraw from those courses for a particular semester. 

If a student does not officially withdraw, and is determined to have never attended, or for any other unofficial withdrawal, the college will determine the last date of attendance by (1) last date of activity within a course, (2) last date a student made a contribution to the class or submitted an assignment, and/or (3) based on instructor’s determination of last date of attendance.

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 Scholarships:

Click here for a list of Scholarships/Donors for 2018-19 (pdf)


Kilgore College Return to Title IV Policy

Kilgore College follows the federal R2T4 policy of returning funds to the appropriate programs as students withdraw during any academic period of enrollment. This policy applies to students who completely withdraw from all classes before the 60% point in the fall, spring, or summer semester.

The following steps are followed in calculating the funds owed back to the Department of Education:

  • Students who officially withdraw from school in person are directed to the financial aid office for counseling before the R2T4 calculation process is started.
  • Students who unofficially withdraw are verified to be fully withdrawn from the institution either through communication with the instructor validated by attendance records and drop slips on file with the Registrar.
  • A weekly report is generated to identify federal financial aid students who have withdrawn from all classes.
  • Calculations are processed via the federal R2T4 software program to determine the amount of federal aid earned per amounts disbursed (or not disbursed) using the percentage of days attended from the total days in the term.
  • The calculations to determine the amount of the R2T4 return are done within 5 days of the notification that the student has withdrawn from classes.
  • The amount of aid which has been earned by the student's days of attendance is changed to
  • show as the amount claimed by Kilgore College in the student account, and the unearned
  • amount of aid is returned to the DOE as soon as the Origination and Disbursement Records are run on a weekly basis.
  • The unearned funds are thus returned to the DOE immediately following the R2T4 calculation in the following order:
    1. Unsubsidized Direct Loans
    2. Subsidized Direct Loans
    3. Direct Plus Loans
    4. Pell Grant
    5. SEOG Grant
  • The student is notified that due to the withdrawal, he/she now owes Kilgore College for funds that have been returned to the Dept.  of Ed. on his/her behalf. The letter to the student explains the reason for the calculation, the formula used to determine the amount owed, the consequences of R2T4, and the payment address the student may use in order to repay the amount owed.
  • A hold is placed on the student's records and is not removed until the amount owed by the student is repaid. Student may not register, request a transcript, or receive further funds from the institution.
  • If a FAFSA is received from the processing center showing an overpayment in federal funds for a transferring student, the student is notified that this must be cleared and repaid before any further funds of any kind may be awarded.
  • The overpayments of funds due to the Dept. of Education from Kilgore College are reported through COD, the Federal Common Origination and Disbursement System, and to NSLDS.
  • A final SAP report is run after the end of the semester. The R2T4 calculation is done for students who receive all F's or W's, and appropriate actions are taken as necessary. Instructors are contacted to determine the last date of attendance or completion of any activity from the student as related to the course of study. If there is no date available, the date used for the R2T4 is the midpoint date of the semester.
  • Funds are returned based on the findings of the SAP report in the same manner as those returned throughout academic semester.

Financial Aid Suspension Appeal Process

Appeal Process:

  • If a student is placed on suspension, the student can complete and submit a suspension appeal to be reviewed by an Institutional appeals committee.
  • Students who fail to meet Kilgore College’s Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress standards for two consecutive semesters will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension.
  •  If the GPA or Hour completion requirement is not met, supporting documentation of a extenuating or catastrophic event that occurred during the timeframe/semester that the student failed to make Satisfactory Academic Progress, must accompany the appeal form when it is submitted to the Financial Aid Office. If not, it will be denied due to lack of documentation.
  • For students who are on suspension for Excessive Hours/Maximum timeframe, it will be the student's responsibility to obtain a degree evaluation from the Kilgore College Counseling Center to submit with the Appeal Packet. The Appeal Form and Degree evaluation must be submitted together or the appeal will be denied.
  • If the appeal is reviewed and granted, the student will be required to make an appointment to review and agree to the terms of the Appeal Contract, prior to financial aid being awarded.
  • It is the student's responsibility to notify the Financial Aid Office if they need to reschedule or cancel an appointment.
  • The student must strictly adhere to the terms of the Appeal Contract. In the event that the terms of the contract are inadvertently changed, the contract becomes invalid and the student will be placed back on suspension with no opportunity for another appeal.

Examples in which the terms of the contract are inadvertently changed:

  1. The student drops or reenrolls in a class that is not a part of their degree plan.
  2. The instructor drops the student for non-attendance.
  3. The student tests out of the class, which makes it impossible for the student to complete the amount of hours necessary by the terms of the contract.
  4. The student does not attend the tutoring lab, as per the terms of their appeal contract.
  5. The student earns an F in one of the classes while under contract.
  6. The student drops a class while under contract.
  7. The student does not maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 while under contract.
  8. .If there is any possibility that the terms of the appeal contract can or will change, it is the student's responsibility to notify the Director or Assistant Director of Financial Aid immediately. There will be NO EXCEPTIONS!!! Notification must be made within the first two weeks of the enrollment semester.
  • At any time during the semester in which the appeal is granted, if the terms of the contract change without prior notification or approval by the Financial Aid Office, the student will be placed back on suspension at the end of the semester the appeal was granted. Financial Aid Appeals can only be grantee/ one time throughout the student's enrollment at Kilgore College.
  • Once the Suspension Appeal Contract has been reviewed and signed, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation and the financial aid package will be awarded.

Financial Aid Probation While on Contract - During the probation semester, the student will still be eligible for financial aid, but the following must be completed by the end of that semester to continue to be eligible for financial aid the next semester. All terms agreed to in the Appeal Contract must be completed successfully, the student must have a 2.0 semester GPA, and may not have withdrawn from any classes in which the student was enrolled.


Kilgore College Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy

All categories of student financial aid are measured by academic progress criteria. Federal regulations require that institutions monitor all financial aid recipients to ensure that students are maintaining a minimum standard academic achievement. Academic standards vary between federal, state, and institutional financial aid funds, but all require a minimum number of hours completed with a minimum grade point average. To continue to receive funding from the Federal Student Aid programs (Pell Grants, other Federal grants, and Federal Direct Loans), students must meet the Kilgore College Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.

Institutional scholarships, State grants, and other non-federal student aid programs have specific academic requirements for each individual program, it is the student's responsibility to read and understand the academic and hourly requirement criteria for each award shown in the student's financial aid award package.

1. Grade Point Average (Qualitative) Standards

Students must maintain a 2.0 Financial Aid cumulative grade point average. (All college level courses combined with any remedial or COLS classes). This does not apply to scholarships. Scholarships carry specific GPA requirements.

  • Grades of A, B, C, D, F, and I will count toward the Financial Aid Cumulative GPA.
  • Grades of W and IP will not count toward the Financial Aid Cumulative GPA.
  • Grades of "IP" are considered as passing grades by Financial Aid.
  • Remedial course work will be included in the Financial Aid Cumulative GPA.
  • Academic work will be checked at the end of each semester (Fall, Spring, Summer) and will include all flex and mini semester course work.
  • Prior periods of enrollment will be evaluated for SAP prior to awarding.

2. Course Hour Completion (Quantitative) Standards

  • Students must complete 70% of the hours enrolled in to maintain progress. This does not apply to scholarships.  Scholarships maintain a specific hourly requirement.
  • The number of hours in which a student is enrolled on the official census day for each course determines the number of hours needed for completion.
  • Completion rates will be checked at the end of each semester and will include all remedial, flex and mini semester course work.
  • Grades of A, B, C, and D are considered as completed grades, and will be included in the calculation of the number of hours completed.
  • Grades of W, F, I, and IP are considered attempted hours and are used for this determination.
  • Hours which transfer into Kilgore College will be counted toward the student's completion rate.

NOTE: All hours attempted are calculated into the 70% attempted hours portion of SAP, however completed hours are not, as classes that are re-taken are replaced with the higher grade. Example: Student takes English 1301 twice. The first time made an “F”, the second time made an “A”. Attempted hours are 6 and completed hours are 3.

3. Maximum Time Frame Completion: (Pace)

Students enrolled at Kilgore College are expected to work toward a specific degree or certificate and to complete that goal within a certain reasonable timeframe.

  •  All periods of enrollment are counted toward the 150% timeframe, whether or not financial aid paid for those hours.
  • Students who enroll in courses not included in their declared major course of study or certificate program will not receive financial aid for those courses.
  • Developmental hours will not count toward the 150% completion rate.
  • Students who change their program of study may use up eligibility for federal aid prior to completion of their degree or certificate.
  •  A student's attempted credit hours cannot exceed a maximum of 150% of the hours required to complete a declared major course of study, or certificate program.
  • Once the student has reached or exceeded the 150% timeframe, he/she will be placed on suspension and no longer be eligible for financial aid

4. Financial Aid Warning

  • Students who do not meet the Financial Aid Cumulative GPA or hourly requirements will be placed on Financial Aid Warning. The student will be eligible to receive financial aid for the subsequent semester while on Financial Aid Warning status.
  • Students on Financial Aid Warning may be subject - but not limited to - a combination of the following institutional requirements:
  1. Mandatory counseling sessions with the Financial Aid Retention Counselor
  2. Tutoring logs showing time spent in The Zone or Math/English/Reading Labs
  3. Limited hours of enrollment, based on student's ability to be successful
  4. No access to online registration
  5. No access to self-registration
  6. Specialized academic plan, with emphasis on re-evaluated degree/certificate plan
  7. Signed contract with Retention Counselor
  8. Suggested limit of hours of employment
  9. Repeat of classes with failing academic grades
  10. Any additional requirements deemed necessary for academic completion and student success

5. Financial Aid Suspension

  • Students who do not meet the Financial Aid Cumulative GPA or Hourly Requirements while on Financial Aid Warning status will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension. While on Suspension, a student is no longer eligible to receive federal financial aid.
  • To reestablish financial aid eligibility, a student must enroll in sufficient hours to raise their cumulative
  • GPA and completion rate to the minimum standards of the Satisfactory Academic Policy. This may be done with personal funds or other funding provided by the student. After completion, he/she must bring this to the attention of the financial aid office in order to be re-evaluated for federal aid eligibility.
  • Students on suspension must also submit an appeal form requesting that eligibility be reinstated.

6. Financial Aid Suspension Appeals

  • Students wishing to appeal their suspension status must complete and submit the following documents:
  1. Financial Aid Suspension Appeal Form and Personalized Academic Worksheet
  2. Official Degree Audit
  3. Typed statement of explanation for the reason of the appeal
  4. Unofficial Kilgore College Transcript
  5. Official documentation of events which prevented academic progress during the semester in which the suspension occurred.
  • Appeals may be considered by an Appeals Committee, composed of a Student Affairs Staff Member, an Academic Advisor, and a faculty member.
  • Appeals that are granted will require an appointment with the Director of Financial Aid or Designee to create a Suspension Success Plan Contract, signed by both the Director and the student.
  • Students whose appeals are granted will be considered to be on Financial Aid Probation.
  • The Appeal Success Plan may likely be composed of the same institutional requirements as those described under the Financial Aid Warning (Item #4) plan.
  • Students must strictly follow the terms of the Appeal Success Plan. If changes are requested, the
  • Director of Financial Aid or Designee must be consulted prior to the change, or the Plan becomes invalid and the student returns to financial aid suspension.

Examples in which the terms of the contract are inadvertently changed:

  • The student drops or enrolls in a class that is not a part of their degree plan.
  • The instructor drops the student for non-attendance.
  • The student tests out of the class, the class is then dropped.
  • The student does not attend the tutoring lab, as per the terms of their appeal contract.
  • The student withdraws from a class.

7. Financial Aid Suspension Appeals Due to Excessive Hours

  • Students may find themselves on suspension due to exceeding the 150% timeframe regulation.
  • Students who exceed the 150% limit will be able to submit an Excessive Hour Appeal.
  • Those students will need to submit a degree audit, showing a limited amount of hours needed to complete a specific program of study.
  • They will be required to sign an Excessive Hour Contract, which will limit the enrollment to program specific hours, and aid that will pay only for those hours.
  • Students must have any enrollment change to the Excessive Hour contract approved by the Director of Financial Aid or designee.

8. Financial Aid Suspension Appeals Due to Excessive Hours

  • Students may find themselves on suspension due to exceeding the 150% timeframe regulation.
  • Students who exceed the 150% limit will be able to submit an Excessive Hour Appeal.
  • Those students will need to submit a degree audit, showing a limited amount of hours needed to complete a specific program of study.
  • They will be required to sign an Excessive Hour Contract, which will limit the enrollment to program specific hours, and aid that will pay for those hours.
  • Students must have any enrollment change to the Excessive Hour contract approved by the Retention Counselor.

9. Financial Aid Eligibility and Developmental Hour Limits

  • Students may receive federal aid for a maximum of 30 developmental hours attempted at Kilgore College. After the 30 hour limit has been exceeded, any further developmental hour requirement will not be paid by federal student aid.
  • Example: If a student has exceeded the 30 hour limit and enrolls for 12 hours during the semester, for which 9 hours are regular credit hours needed for degree, and 3 hours are a developmental class. Financial aid will pay the eligible amount of 9 hours, but not the total of 12 hours.

10. Transfer Students

  • Students with no history at KC will be assumed to be making satisfactory academic progress at the time they transfer into Kilgore College.
  • Hours that transfer into the major course of study will be counted toward the 150% timeframe eligibility regulation, along with any hours of enrollment at Kilgore College.
  • Transferring students need to be aware that the federal regulations concerning the Pell LEU and Loan Aggregate Limits still apply to any award package at KC.
  • lf the college transcript(s) are not on file with the KC Registrar's Office, the student will be considered as a first year student for loan purposes.
  • Hours that are accepted and transferred into Kilgore College will be counted in the completion rate.

11. Miscellaneous Information

  • Financial aid funds will pay to repeat a class if the student originally received a grade of F, I or W, or if the program requires a grade of C or higher. Once the student receives a passing grade, but desires to repeat the course, he will need to pay with personal funds.
  • Federal student aid will also pay the Excessive Developmental Charge for developmental courses as needed, but only up to the 30 hour developmental limit.

12. Scholarships and Academic Progress

  • Most scholarship and non-federal aid funds carry specific academic and enrollment requirements for renewed funding to a student account.
  • Students receiving institutional, departmental, or state funds should check with the Scholarship Coordinator in regard to Letters of Agreement, showing the terms of scholarship eligibility.
  • Scholarship eligibility is evaluated at the end of each long semester (Fall, Spring, Summer), after which students who have lost eligibility will receive a notification advising of this status.
  • Scholarships do not have a Warning or Probation Status - (similar to federal student aid funds). Students who do not achieve the academic or enrollment criteria for renewal will not be awarded those funds for the subsequent semester (even if the Letter of Agreement shows the scholarship is awarded for one academic year.)
  • Certain scholarships which are considered to be "performance based" will carry different terms for renewal.

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Student Affairs:

Conduct and Discipline

The Vice President of Student Development is responsible for implementing student disciplinary procedures provided in the College’s Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Code of Conduct Policy. This policy states, “Kilgore College reserves the right to maintain a safe and orderly educational environment for students and staff. Therefore, when a student's behavior disrupts or threatens to disrupt the College community, appropriate disciplinary action will be taken. The purpose of this code is not to restrict student rights but to protect the rights of individuals in their academic pursuits.”

Students at Kilgore College are considered to be mature adults who enter classes voluntarily. By entering classes, students take upon themselves certain responsibilities and obligations that include an honest attempt at academic performance and social behavior consistent with the lawful purpose of the College. Students maintain all legal rights of citizenship while enrolled and are expected to remember that they are living in a democratic situation. The reputation of the College rests upon the shoulders of students as well as on the administration, staff, and faculty; and it is hoped that each student will maintain high standards of citizenship. The campus and College will not be a place of refuge or sanctuary for illegal or irresponsible behavior. Students, as all citizens, are subject to civil authority on and off the campus. Common courtesy and cooperation make the above suffice for a long list of rules and regulations.

The KC Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Code of Conduct Policy and Procedures are available on the College Policy and Procedures webpage, https://www.kilgore.edu/about/human-resources/policy-and-procedures#stu-comp-policy.


Complaints and Grievances:

Student Complaints:

The College’s Student Complaint Policy states, “Kilgore College is committed to resolving student concerns or complaints in the most expeditious and informal manner possible. For situations that cannot be resolved in an informal manner, students have the right to submit a written complaint.” The KC Student Complaint Policy and Procedures are available on the College Policy and Procedures webpage, https://www.kilgore.edu/about/human-resources/policy-and-procedures#stu-comp-policy.

A valid student complaint is one that meets following criteria:

  1. The individual filing the complaint is an enrolled student of Kilgore College.
  2. The student has first taken the problem or question to the instructor, staff member or office in which they experienced dissatisfaction in an attempt to resolve the situation informally.
  3. The student completes a standard, online written complaint form. Partial, incomplete, or anonymously submitted Student Complaint Forms will not be accepted as valid.

For more information on the student complaint process and access to the online Student Complaint Form, visit the Student Complaint webpage at https://www.kilgore.edu/node/7572.

Complaints Against the Institution

If after exhausting the College’s complaint process, the student may initiate a complaint with the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). To file a complaint with THECB, one must complete the Student Complaint and Release Forms and the Authorization to Disclose Medical Record Information (required if a disability is alleged). These forms must be sent either by electronic mail to StudentComplaints@thecb.state.tx.us or by mail to: Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Office of General Counsel, P.O. Box 12788, Austin, Texas 78711-2788. Facsimile transmissions of the forms are not accepted. More information on this option is available on the THECB website at: www.thecb.state.tx.us/studentcomplaints.

Individuals may also file a complaint with Kilgore College's regional accrediting agency, The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools-Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC). To file a complaint with SACSCOC, one must complete the Commission's Complaint Form (available at http://www.sacscoc.org/pdf/081705/complaint%20form.pdf) and send two print copies to: President, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges, 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097. In most cases, the SACSCOC complaint procedures require the student to exhaust all institutional complaint avenues before a complaint can be filed at the accrediting agency level.

Kilgore College students are advised to first attempt to resolve complaints with KC administration.

Grievances Concerning Discrimination and/or Harassment

The College’s Nondiscrimination and Student Grievance Policy states, “Kilgore College prohibits discrimination, including harassment, against any student on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, age, national origin, disability, veteran’s status, genetic information, or any other characteristic protected by institutional policy or local, state, or federal law. The institution is committed to promptly responding to and resolving concerns involving allegations of illegal discrimination, including illegal harassment, in violation of local, state and/or federal civil rights laws and/or regulations.” The KC Nondiscrimination Policy and Procedures are available on the College Policy and Procedures webpage, https://www.kilgore.edu/about/human-resources/policy-and-procedures#stu-comp-policy.

The grievance process involves an immediate initial investigation to determine if there is reasonable cause to believe the nondiscrimination policy has been violated. If so, the College will initiate a prompt, thorough, and impartial investigation, or facilitate an informal resolution. This investigation is designed to provide a fair and reliable determination about whether the College’s nondiscrimination policy has been violated. If so, the College will implement a prompt and effective remedy designed to end the discrimination, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.

Students who wish to report a concern or file a grievance relating to discrimination or harassment may do so by reporting the concern to the college Title IX Coordinator:

Bindy Tice
Kilgore College
1100 Broadway Blvd.
Kilgore, TX 75662
(903) 988-7590
btice@kilgore.edu

Individuals with grievances of discrimination also always have the right to file a formal grievance with the United States Department Education:

Office for Civil Rights (OCR)
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-1100
Customer Service Hotline #: (800) 421-3481 Facsimile: (202) 453-6012
TDD#: (877) 521-2172
Email: OCR@ed.gov
Web: http://www.ed.gov/ocr


Inclement Weather Policy

The administration will attempt to make an early morning decision on school closing and have that decision announced through area radio and television media, posted on the Kilgore College website at www.kilgore.edu, and sent via Ranger Rave Alert System text messaging by 6:30 a.m.


Smoking and Tobacco Products on Campus

Smoking/tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, are allowed in designated outdoor areas only. Such products are prohibited in all other areas as well as inside all facilities and vehicles owned, leased or operated by Kilgore College. In addition, the majority of cities in which Kilgore College operate have enacted strict smoking ordinances. Kilgore College regulations and municipal ordinances apply equally to all College faculty, staff, students, administration, and visitors. Everyone is expected to dispose of cigarettes properly. Individuals violating the smoking regulations/municipal ordinances and/or failing to dispose of their tobacco products properly may receive a Kilgore College and/or municipal citation and fine.


Parking & Traffic Rules and Regulations 

The policies and regulations contained herein are given the effect of law by Senate Bill 162, 60th Legislature, 1967.

Kilgore College is a "Parking by Permit Only" campus. The operation of a motor vehicle or bicycle on college property is a PRIVILEGE granted by the college and is not an inherent right of any faculty/staff member, student, or visitor. All faculty/staff, students, and visitors who park on college property must have a valid Kilgore College issued parking permit or temporary parking permit obtained from the Kilgore College Police Department. When registering a vehicle a student must provide the license plate number of the vehicle that will be used on campus.

The college assumes no liability and/or responsibility for damage to or theft of any vehicle parked or driven on campus. The college assumes no responsibility or any duty to protect any vehicle or its contents at any time the vehicle is operated or parked on the campus. No bailment is created by granting any parking or operating privileges regarding a vehicle on any property owned, leased, or otherwise controlled by the college. These regulations are in effect at all times on college property. Controlled parking areas include all parking lots on campus. Signs or pavement markings have been placed to designate these parking areas. A student parking in an unauthorized area may be issued a parking citation. A student's vehicle will be impounded at the owner's expense if more than three violations have been issued. For further information concerning parking/traffic violations and the payment of fines consult the Student Handbook.

For more information on the rules and regulations please visit https://www.kilgore.edu/about/police-department-kcpd


Student Development:

Counseling Services 

Professional counselors, providing a variety of services to students, office in the Counseling Center on the Kilgore campus and at KC-Longview. KC counselors provide educational, career, and personal counseling. For more information call (903) 983-8206 in Kilgore or KC-Longview, (903) 753-2642. 


Testing Services 

Testing services are available on the main campus in Kilgore and at KC-Longview.

The testing center in Kilgore is located on the 2nd floor of the Devall Student Center while in Longview, the center is located in the Hendrix Building. Both centers are authorized testing sites for a variety of tests including various national and state standardized testing programs, institutional examinations for local placement, and credit by examination. They are also responsible for proctoring exams for e-Learning courses taught through KC. Final exams for these e-Learning courses begin the week before finals during the spring and fall semesters. All testing requires an appointment at least 24 hours in advance and valid photo id must be presented. Students may direct inquiries to the Kilgore Testing Center at (903) 983-8215 or email: testing@kilgore.edu. Students may contact the testing center at Kilgore College-Longview at (903) 236-2051 or email: longviewtesting@kilgore.edu.

For more information on available services, hours of operation, and testing rules and requirements, please visit the appropriate webpage:

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Career Services 

Services provided by the Counseling Centers and information on the KC website:

  • Career exploration and career counseling
  • Assistance with construction of resumes
  • Opportunities for students to connect with employers
  • Host a job board for on- and off-campus jobs and internship opportunities

The Counseling Centers in Longview (Hendricks Building) and Kilgore (Devall Student Center)

offer assistance in Career Counseling. We also offer a number of Career Resources on our Website at www.kilgore.edu. Go to the Student Services link and look for Counseling/Advising. Click on this link and look for Career Services.

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TRIO Fast Track Program

The TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) Program provides services to U.S. citizens and permanent residents enrolled at Kilgore College that are identified as first generation, low income, and/or students with disabilities. Accepted participants will receive support in completing their associate's degree and transferring to a four-year college to further their education. Support services include academic coaching, advising, tutoring services, career exploration, access to computer lab, assistance in completing FAFSA and scholarship applications, visits to four-year colleges and universities, and participation in academic and cultural enrichment activities.  TRIO SSS Program serves 160 participants each year.  Students may apply to the TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) program by calling (903) 988-7590 or searching for TRIO on the kilgore.edu website.  The US Dept of Education funds the TRIO SSS Program with an annual budget of $243,357 (FY 2017-2020). 


Student Success Programs

The purpose of the Student Success Programs is to provide and coordinate academic and support services for all Kilgore College students as they make the transition to college life. Support services include:

  • Free tutoring
  • Computer and printing needs
  • Study skills counseling
  • New Student Orientation and Online Orientation
  • Ranger Reminder – Ongoing Orientation
  • Retention/Early Alert

Students may come by the Student Support Office in the Student Support (SS) Building, Room 112, or call (903) 988.7491. For more information regarding New Student Orientation, students may come by the Student Success Office located in the Support Building, Room 120, or call (903) 988-7537.


Student Health Services

For emergency first aid, a trainer is available in the Parks Fitness Center. A nurse is available in the Parks Fitness Center at certain hours to be posted in campus buildings and in The Flare at the beginning of each academic year. Student health services are available at no cost.

Student Health Insurance

The college maintains information on third party health and accident insurance for students. Information concerning such coverage is available from the Vice President of Student Development’s Office in the Devall Student Center, Room 136. Please note, the college provides information only and does not endorse or recommend any specific vendors or carriers nor does it guarantee the coverages and services provided by any vendors or carriers.

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KC Police Department 

The KC Police Department is composed of certified law enforcement officers who have the authority to enforce all local, state and federal laws and college regulations. Officers are on duty on a 24-hour basis. The department serves the college community by helping to maintain a safe and secure environment for each person and his/her possessions while on campus and to assist staff, students, and visitors with minor vehicle problems. Police officers are visible on campus in marked vehicles. See the Kilgore College Student Handbook for more information or call (903) 983-8650. 


Housing and Food Services 

Kilgore College maintains three residence halls with space for approximately 450 students. Applicants for on-campus housing must document compliance with State law regarding bacterial meningitis immunizations prior to being assigned to housing. In addition, all applicants will be subject to a criminal background screening and may be denied housing based upon this review. For more information on these policies and requirements, visit our website at www.kilgore.edu. Residents must choose one of three meal plans offered for meal service. Commuter students may purchase a meal plan thru the Cashier's Office. Student may contact the Director of Food Services in the cafeteria to purchase Ranger Bucks to use in the cafeteria or in the snack bar. For more information, please call the Director at (903) 983-8286 or visit the Director in the cafeteria. 


Student Center

The Devall Student Center is the hub of many student activities on campus. Student Services such as: Admissions, Registration, Financial Aid, Counseling, Housing, Student Life, the cafeteria and the campus bookstore are all found in this convenient facility. A game room, student meeting room, lounges, an ATM, and mail center are centrally located for students use. For additional information on using/reserving college facilities call (903) 983-8219.


KC Bookstore 

The KC Bookstore, located in the Devall Student Center, sells textbooks (some are rentable), computers, electronics, supplies, articles of clothing, souvenirs, and miscellaneous items. The Bookstore accepts cash, personal checks, money orders as well as MasterCard, Visa, American Express and Discover charge cards. The Bookstore is open from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 7:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Friday. The Bookstore will have extended hours the first two class days of long semesters.  The phone number is (903) 983-8277.  KC-Longview also has a full service bookstore. Hours of operation are 7:45 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and from 7:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday. The phone number is (903) 753-2642. 

Returning Textbooks. When a student finds it necessary to return a textbook to the Bookstore for refund, the student must present the cash register receipt for the original purchase and the unmarked, undamaged textbook. Refunds/Exchanges on textbooks will be made through the 5th class day on long semesters and the 2nd class day on all others. Refunds up to 12th class day during long semester and 4th class day for short semester may be made with drop slip. A 10% restocking fee may apply unless the class is cancelled. For the complete Return Policy visit www.kcbookstore.com.

Procedure for Buying Back Textbooks. The Bookstore may buy back selected used, current-edition textbooks if these books are in good condition. Prices for individual textbooks are based on present stock level, projected utilization, and/or used textbooks maintained by the Bookstore. Buybacks are conducted during certain times of the year, visit www.kcbookstore.com for dates.


Student Activities 

Kilgore College offers a variety of student activities, including student organizations, performing groups, intercollegiate athletics, intramurals and student publications. For more information on student activities contact the Coordinator of Student Activities located in the Devall Student Center or telephone (903)-988-7520.


Instructional Student Support:

Disability Services

The college provides services to students with documented disabilities. The Disability Services Coordinator, who can be reached at (903) 983-8682, serves as a clearinghouse for all students with disabilities. These services may include, but are not limited to, accommodations in class, tutoring, interpreting for the deaf, readers, scribes, note takers, and taped texts. Students seeking accommodations must contact the Disability Services Coordinator and provide the necessary documentation in a timely manner.

Special Populations

Kilgore College offers support services to students classified as career technical (workforce) majors and have economic need. Special population students include single parents, displaced homemakers, persons with disabilities, students in career technical (workforce) majors non-traditional for their gender, and persons with limited English proficiency. CTE/Workforce students are encouraged to apply for assistance with childcare, textbook lending and transportation prior to the beginning of each semester. Special Populations students are eligible for walk-in tutoring and other services while they are enrolled in courses at KC. For additional information contact the Instructional Student Support Office at (903) 236-2030.

Randolph C. Watson Library

Located on the mall in the center of the Kilgore main campus, the newly renovated Watson Library provides spacious reading and study areas.  The library consists of over 105,000 items that include books, electronic books, videos, microfilm, journals in both paper and electronic format, and A/V materials. Access to approximately 70 databases that include encyclopedias, subject specific full text databases and indexes that include over 7,000 full text journals, are available through the library’s web page (http://library.kilgore.edu/library). A team of professional librarians and support staff provide services that include interlibrary loan, bibliographic instruction, and cooperative borrowing privileges through TexShare.

The first floor of the library is for collaborative learning and includes 40 computers, current periodicals, a coffee bar, the circulation desk, and staff offices.  The second floor is for quiet study. Books, including reference and bound journals. are located on the second floor.  A reference desk is on both the first and second floors.  There are four study rooms and a conference room that can be reserved.  The Bone Learning Center consists of two computer rooms of 30 computers each.  One computer room is primarily for Library Instruction, and the other is for patrons who want a quiet computer work area.

For the most current information please check the library’s webpage or call (903) 983-8237.

 

Fall and Spring Library Hours:

7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday-Thursday
7:30 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Friday
2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday

Summer Library Hours:

7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Wednesday
7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday
7 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Friday
Closed Saturday/Sunday

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Distance Education/eLearning 

Kilgore College offers several different modes of distance education/eLearning:

  • Online or Web-based courses: Since course work is completed over the Internet, students must possess computer skills including email, basic word processing and a familiarity with the Internet in order to be successful. Most courses may require you to come to campus for testing (unless an approved alternative is arranged) or for labs.
  • Hybrid courses: Students meet in the classroom for a shorter scheduled time period each week while completing the balance of their coursework on-line.
  • Interactive Television (ITV) Courses: Courses are taught using videoconferencing equipment at classrooms on the Kilgore College campus and at some local high schools (for dual credit students). The instructor teaches live from the sending site, while students at the receiving site interact with the instructor and the students at the sending site using the videoconferencing equipment in their classroom.

     For up to the minute information about eLearning at Kilgore College see:

For information about Instructional Technology:

Doris Johnson, Coordinator
Instructional Support
Phone: (903) 988-3701
Office: Woodfin Center for Instructional Tech (WDFIN), 101
djohnson@kilgore.edu

Schlunda Hall, eLearning Help Desk
Phone: (903) 984-8531
Office: Visitor Desk – Devall Student Center
schall@kilgore.edu


Virtual College of Texas (VCT)

Kilgore College is a participant in the Virtual College of Texas. Students enroll locally at Kilgore College and study with students across Texas. Visit www.vct.org for a list of available courses. If you find a course you are interested in, the next step is to request the course from the Kilgore College eLearning department at via email: disted@kilgore.edu.


Parks Fitness Center

Parks Fitness Center is located on the Kilgore campus. This facility is available to currently enrolled students and includes racquetball courts, basketball/volleyball courts, a 17-station Cybex machine area, weight room, an aerobics floor, and an indoor walking/running track. Any student registered for twelve or more semester hours (six or more for summer term) may present his/her student I.D. to use these facilities at no charge during designated recreation hours. Part time students may pay a discounted fee for the use of the center. Additional information about the use of these recreational facilities, hours of operation, and special recreational offerings is available at (903) 983-8630 or (903) 983-8631.


Service Learning

Service learning is are educational experiences associated with selected classes in which students participate in organized service activities that meets identified community needs. Students reflect on the service activity, gain further understanding of course content, and gain a broader understanding of the discipline. Service learning students help build a better community, and the community helps create a better informed and better prepared student. Service Learning is a rewarding opportunity for both instructors and students to grow and learn. For more information about service learning, please contact us at (903) 983-8223 or email rjohnson@kilgore.edu.


Continuing Education & Workforce Development

Continuing Education and Workforce Development classes provide learning opportunities for leisure pursuits, career advancement, and employment skills. The non-degree, non-credit courses offer enriching, quality instruction to individuals for their personal and professional improvement. Workforce Development also provides training solutions for business and industry, including customized contract training, pre-employment screening, and assessment services. A listing of Continuing Education programs with specific telephone numbers is outlined below under Special Programs.

Admission

Usually no admission requirements exist for students registering for non-credit courses. For information regarding registration and class cancellations, please see the current Continuing Education Class Schedule.

Registration

Students may register no more than 60 days prior to the beginning of class. Some classes have limited enrollment and are filled on a "first-come-first-served" basis, so early registration is advisable. Students may register by mail or in person at the Bert E. Woodruff Adult Education Center, 220 N. Henderson Blvd, Kilgore, Texas 75662 or in Longview at KC-Longview Joe M. Hendrix Center, 300 S. High St, Longview, Texas 75602.

Transcripts

The Kilgore Continuing Education office at 220 North Henderson Boulevard and the Longview Continuing Education office at 300 South High Street issue official continuing education transcripts according to the provisions of the federal Family and Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The offices will not honor a transcript request without the student's signature and photo ID. The student must clear all financial and other obligations to the college before the college will release the transcript. To request a Continuing Education transcript, the student should complete the Kilgore College Transcript Request form and indicate the number of copies requested on the form. Kilgore College does not charge for transcripts. A student's written consent is required if the transcript is picked up by a third party.

Withdrawals / Transfers / Refunds

  • To withdraw formally from a Continuing Education class, a student must contact the center where the course is offered either by phone or in person during working hours.

For refunds, please see the "Refund Policy - Drops and Withdrawls" on this page.


Special Programs 

Adult Education and Literacy

Kilgore College offers a full array of tuition-free classes for adults, ages 18 and above, to help improve their lives. Services range from literacy to twelfth-grade level instruction. Adults who successfully complete any of these programs often find themselves better prepared for college entrance or the workforce, with an increased likelihood of improved job opportunities, better income, and higher self-esteem. These classes are headquartered at the Kilgore College-Longview but are also held in a number of other locations throughout the area. Call (903) 236-2004 or (903) 753-2642 ext. 2004 for further information:

Texas Certificate of High School Completion Exams (GED, HiSET, TASC) and Literacy Training.

Classes provide opportunities to prepare for the high school equivalency exam; to prepare for college entrance exams; pre-employment, military entrance, and other pre-college level exams; and to improve basic reading, writing, and math skills for any adult who seeks to do so.

English as a Second Language (English classes for speakers of other languages)

Students learn to read, write, and speak English in the ESL program. Instruction levels include literacy through advanced level. 

Advanced Welding Academy

The Kilgore College Advanced Welding Academy provides training for workers who have academic credentials or have worked in the field a minimum of three (3) to five (5)years and need to develop specific skills for advanced welding positions.

Commercial Driving Academy

The KC Commercial Driving Academy offers courses to train individuals who are new to the field of commercial driving and to enhance and reinforce skills of experienced drivers. View the schedule at http://www.kilgore.edu/cdl.asp or call (903)-983-8170.

East Texas Police Academy

In addition to being approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the East Texas Police Academy is licensed by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement as a Law Enforcement Academy and is contracted by the Commission to provide training courses. Law Enforcement Academies licensed by the Commission on Law Enforcement provide basic licensing and continuing education training courses which may be submitted for TCOLE credit.  ETPA offers a diverse selection of classes: the 750-hour Basic Peace Officer Course, the 96-hour Basic County Corrections Course, the 40-hour Basic Telecommunicator Certification Course, all required intermediate-level core courses, mandated recurrent courses, and a host of other specialized basic and advanced courses.  For application and further information, visit the East Texas Police Academy web site at www.easttexaspoliceacademy.org or call (903) 983-8663.

Electric Power Technology Certificate

The Electric Power Technology certificate is a ten-week series of courses designed to prepare individuals for jobs as electrical lineworkers. Graduates earn an electric power technology certificate which is the equivalent to one year of on-the-job training. View the schedule at http://www.kilgore.edu/electric_power_technology.asp or call (903)-983-8288.

Industrial Electrical Technology Certificate

The Industrial Electrical Technology Certificate prepares individuals who are new to the field of electrical applications in an industrial workplace. It also enhances and reinforces skills of experienced workers. Individuals completing this certificate are eligible for employment as an apprentice with a licensed electrician. View the schedule at http://www.kilgore.edu/wf_industrial_electric_tech.asp or call (903)-983-8288.

Kilgore College Fire Academy

The Fire Academy is recognized by the State of Texas as an Exemplary Program, the Kilgore College Fire Academy is approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and is certified by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection and the State Fireman and Fire Marshal's Association.

The 470 hour academy offers NFPA 1001 Basic Structural Firefighter I and II certification.  This academy is offered in both an onsite and an online format.  For application and further information, visit the webpage http://www.kilgore.edu/fire_academy.asp or call (903) 983-8662 or (903) 983-8177.

Phlebotomy

Phlebotomy is the medical practice of opening a vein and drawing blood. This 200 hours course consists of 80 hours of classroom lecture, 20 hours of classroom clinical, and 100 hours of site clinical. For more information, please view the Phlebotomy webpage at www.kilgore.edu http://www.kilgore.edu/continuingedu.asp or call (903) 983-8677.

Risk Management Institute

Free safety courses are offered through a generous grant from the Texas Mutual Insurance Company. A variety of OSHA classes are scheduled each semester at no cost. View the schedule at http://www.kilgore.edu/risk_management.asp or call (903)-988-8170.


Graduation 

KC offers four associate degrees: the Associate of Arts, the Associate of Arts in Teaching, the Associate of Science, and the Associate of Applied Science. In addition KC offers a Certificate of Completion for completion of prescribed occupational programs. Additional information about degrees or certificates of completion is available from the Counseling Center on the Kilgore main campus (903) 983-8206 or the counselor at KC - Longview (903) 753-2642 and (903) 983-8281 .

Catalog Designation

Students have the option of meeting graduation requirements of the current KC catalog or those requirements outlined in the KC catalog under which they entered the college (if continuously enrolled). A lapse of two long semesters dictates usage of the current catalog.

Planning

To ensure that the student is meeting all requirements for graduation, the student should consult a counselor early in the student's college career. Final responsibility for meeting all requirements for graduation rests with the student.

Requirements

For Associate of Arts, the Associate of Arts in Teaching, and the Associate of Science degrees, requirements for graduation consist of (l) General Requirements for Graduation, (2) Core Curriculum Requirement and elective requirements for Graduation. The Associate of Applied Science degree and Certificates of Completion are awarded in Workforce Education programs and the graduation requirements are listed under the individual course of study for those programs.

Computer Competency Requirement

Computer competency is defined as the demonstrated ability to use information technology. It includes the ability to use computer applications in education and in the workplace as well as the ability to use the Internet and other information technology resources safely.

Associate of Science, Associate of Arts, and Associate of Arts in Teaching students at Kilgore College must demonstrate computer competency in one of two ways:

  1. Pass BCIS 1305
  2. Achieve a score of 70 or higher on the KC Computer Competency Test. The test consists of both computer concepts and application usage.

The computer competency requirement should be completed no later than the completion of 24 semester credit hours.

More information about preparing for and taking the Computer Competency Test is available at www.kilgore.edu.

Transfer of Credit to KC for Graduation

Students who did not complete graduation requirements while enrolled at Kilgore College may elect to take their remaining courses at another college for transfer back to KC in order to receive a degree. A minimum of 25% of the degree requirements must be completed at Kilgore College. Students who were not enrolled at KC during the preceding academic year must meet current graduation requirements (even if different from the graduation requirements that were in place during the student's attendance at

KC). Students should contact the Counseling Center prior to registering for courses at another college to determine which courses remain for completion of degree requirements. Students should also contact the KC Office of Admissions and Registrar to make sure that the courses will be accepted in transfer. An official transcript must be sent directly from the other college to the KC Registrar's

Office once the transfer work is completed. It is recommended that students apply for graduation during the semester in which they are completing the required courses. (See deadlines in

"Application for Graduation" section).

General Requirements for Graduation

The following are the general requirements for graduation:

  1. Earn a minimum of 60 semester hours for an associate of arts or associate of science degree, 60 semester hours for the associate of arts in teaching degree or earn the required number of semester hours for an associate of applied science or a certificate of completion unless otherwise noted in the degree plan total hours.
  2. Complete all course requirements for the degree or certificate sought
  3. Complete Computer Competency Requirement. (AA, AAT, and AS students)
  4. Earn an overall or cumulative GPA (grade point average) of 2.0 in all courses attempted
  5. Return all properties of the college and satisfactorily settle all financial obligations to the college
  6. Complete at least 25% of semester hours from the degree sought at Kilgore College
  7. Satisfy all requirements of the Texas Success Initiative unless exemption or waiver status applies.
  8. Submit graduation application by deadline in college catalog.

Application for Graduation

Degrees and certificates are not awarded automatically. To be considered a candidate for a degree or certificate, the student must submit an application for graduation through on the KC website. Applications are available during the dates listed below and must be submitted on or before the following dates:

  • Fall Semester (December) Graduate: August 15 - October 1
  • Spring Semester (May) Graduate: January 15- March 1
  • Summer I Semester (July) Graduate: May 1 - June 15
  • Summer II Semester (August) Graduate: May 1 -July 15

Degrees and certificates will be officially conferred when the Office of Admissions and Registrar certifies that all graduation requirements have been met. In order for transfer courses to be used toward graduation, an official transcript must be on file in the Office of Admissions and Registrar. A student does not have to be enrolled in KC courses during the semester that he or she makes application. If graduation requirements were completed during a prior semester, the degree or certificate will be posted to the transcript at the end of the semester in which the application for graduation is submitted (if received by above deadline).

Commencement Ceremonies

Commencement Ceremonies. KC has formal graduation exercises in December, May and August. It is generally expected that graduates will participate in the ceremony at the end of the semester in which degree requirements are completed (Summer I graduates participate in the August ceremony). Participation in the ceremony prior to completing degree requirements must be recommended by the dean of the division and approved by the registrar. Participation is ceremonial only and does not confer on a student any rights to a degree or certificate. The transcript is the official document that verifies graduation status. Transcripts may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Registrar. All diplomas are mailed no later than 4-6 weeks after the end of the semester. For additional information, contact the Office of Admissions and Registrar at (903) 983-8606.

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KILGORE COLLEGE CORE CURRICULUM*

A core curriculum is defined by the state of Texas as "curriculum in the liberal arts, humanities, sciences, political, social, and cultural history, that all graduates of an institution of higher education are required to complete before receiving a baccalaureate degree." KC's Core Curriculum consists of 42 semester credit hours that will transfer as the core to any state college or university. After completing the core, a student may need only 18 additional semester credit hours to receive the associate of arts or the associate of science degree.

A core curriculum is defined by the state of Texas as "curriculum in the liberal arts, humanities, sciences, political, social, and cultural history, that all graduates of an institution of higher education are required to complete before receiving a baccalaureate degree." KC's Core Curriculum consists of 42 semester credit hours that will transfer as the core to any state college or university. After completing the core, a student may need only 18 additional semester credit hours to receive the associate of arts or the associate of science degree.

 Printable version of the Core Curriculum (pdf)

COMPONENT AREA

REQUIRED COURSES

SEMESTER HOURS

Communication

6 hours to be selected from: ENGL 1301 and 1302 or 2311

6

Mathematics

3 hours to be selected from:
MATH 1314, 1316, 1324, 1325, *1332, 1342, *1350, **2412, 2413, 2414, 2415
*Math 1332 and 1350 will not fulfill Math requirement for AS degree
**Those taking a 2400 level Math course as their core curriculum Requirement will earn only 3 SCHs toward Core completion. The other SCH may count toward electives in an associate's degree.

3

Life and Physical Sciences

6 hours to be selected from:

BIOL 1406, 1407, 1408, 1409, 2401, 2402, 2404, 2406
ENVR 1401
CHEM 1405, 1406, 1411, 1412
GEOL 1301, 1403, 1404, 1405
PHYS 1401, 1402, 1403, 1404, 1405, 2425, 2426

Additional SCHs from labs may be counted toward electives in an associate’s degree.

6

Language, Philosophy & Culture

3 hours to be selected from: ENGL 2322, 2323, 2326, 2332, 2333
HIST 2311, 2312, 2321, 2322, PHIL 1301, 2306

3

Creative Arts

3 hours to be selected from: ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304, DANCE 2303
DRAM 1310, 2362, 2366, MUSI 1306, 1307

3

American History

6 hours to be selected from: HIST 1301, 1302

6

Government/Political Science

6 hours to be selected from: GOVT 2305, 2306

6

Social and Behavioral Sciences

3 hours to be selected from: COMM 1307; ECON 2301, 2302;

GEOG 1303; PSYC 2301, 2314; SOCI 1301, 1306; TECA 1354

3

Component Area Option

3 hours to be selected from:
Component Area Option 1: SPCH 1315, 1318
and 3 hours from Component Area Option 2:

Any additional course listed in the core curriculum above or MATH 1351 or EDUC 1300.

6

Total Minimum Requirements

 

42

Core Objectives of the Texas Core Curriculum

  • Critical Thinking Skills - creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information
  • Communication Skills - effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication
  • Empirical and Quantitative Skills - manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions
  • Teamwork - ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal
  • Social Responsibility - intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities
  • Personal Responsibility - ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making

 Printable version of the Core Curriculum (pdf)

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EXPLANATION OF DEGREES 

Academic Degrees. The Associate of Arts, Associate of Arts in Teaching and the Associate of Science degree provide general academic curricula in university-parallel and pre-professional courses of study which enable students to enter as juniors at senior colleges or universities of their choice. Students who attend KC for one or two years and transfer to senior colleges or universities should have no difficulty completing transfer of credits if they follow these steps:

  1. Select a major field of study and a senior college or university which offers a bachelor's degree in the chosen field
  2. Write or visit the Office of Admissions and Registrar of the senior college or university to obtain a current copy of its catalog, and study the freshman and sophomore courses offered
  3. See an academic KC advisor or counselor who will help select KC courses corresponding to those offered for freshman and sophomore years at the senior college or university
  4. Complete the courses with a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0 (C average)
  5. Apply for admission to the senior college or university according to that institution’s admission policies and ask the Office of Admissions and Registrar to send a transcript to the receiving institution

Associate of Arts (AA) Degree:

 Printable version of AA Degree Plan (pdf)

Associate of Arts (AA) Degree

 

REQUIRED COURSES

SEMESTER HOURS

English 1301, 1302

6

Language, Philosophy and Culture (see list in core curriculum)

3

Speech 1315 or 1318

3

History 1301, 1302

6

Government 2305, 2306

6

Social/Behavioral Science (see list in core curriculum)

3

Creative Arts (see list in core curriculum)

3

Math (See list in core curriculum)

3

Life and Physical Sciences (See list in core curriculum; must include one lab science course)

7-8

Additional core curriculum course or MATH 1351 or EDUC 1300

3

Electives*                                                                    

16 - 17

                                                                                      Total

60

* 3 elective hours may include BCIS 1305 if needed to meet the College computer competency requirement.

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Associate of Science (AS) Degree:

 Printable version of AS Degree Plan (pdf)

Associate of Science (AS) Degree

 

REQUIRED COURSES

SEMESTER HOURS

English 1301 and 1302 or 2311

6

Speech 1315 or 1318

3

History 1301, 1302

6

Government 2305, 2306

6

Social/Behavioral Science (see list in core curriculum)

3

Language, Philosophy and Culture (see list in core curriculum)

3

Creative Arts (see list in core curriculum)

3

Math (any college-level MATH in the core curriculum except for MATH 1332, 1350, or 1351)

6

Life and Physical Sciences (three 4-hour lab science course that are listed in the core curriculum)

12

Electives*                                                                    

12

                                                                                      Total

60

 

* 3 elective hours may include BCIS 1305 if needed to meet the College computer competency requirement.

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Associate of Arts in Teaching Degree

 Printable version of AAT Degree Plan (pdf)

Leading to Initial Texas Teacher Certification 
EC-6, 4-8, EC-12 Special Education

Credit Hours To Be Completed

Communication

6 hours from: ENGL 1301 & 1302
3 hours from: SPCH 1315

9

Mathematics

9 hours from: MATH 1314, 1350, 1351

9

Life and Physical Sciences

11-12 hours to be selected from core sciences
*Students who choose the 3 hour non-lab science elective must complete one additional credit hour to meet the 60-hour requirement for graduation.

11-12
 

Creative Arts

3 hours to be selected from:
ARTS 1301, 1303, 1304, DANCE 2303,
DRAM 1310, 2361, 2362, 2366, or MUSI 1306

3

Language, Philosophy and Culture

3 hours to be selected from:
ENGL 2322, 2323, 2326, 2332, 2333

3

Social and Behavioral
Sciences/History/ Government

6 hours to be selected from: HIST 1301, 1302
6 hours from: GOVT 2305, 2306

12

Social/Behavioral Science

3 hours from: TECA 1354 or core curriculum Social Science elective

3

Electives*

3 hours to be selected from the Core Curriculum
 

3

Other Required Courses

6 hours from: EDUC 1301, EDUC 2301

6

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS

60

 

*3 elective hours may include BCIS 1305 if needed to meet the College computer competency requirement.

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Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree

 Printable version of AAS Degree Plan (pdf)

See individual degree requirements for Workforce Education Programs.

General Education Requirements for Associate of Applied Science Degrees

In compliance with accreditation requirements, each Associate of Applied Science degree must have a minimum of 15 semester hours of general education courses. One course (at least 3 semester credit hours) must be selected from each of the following areas: Humanities/Fine Arts, Social/Behavioral Sciences, and Natural Sciences/Mathematics.

The required general education courses are as follows:

A minimum of 15 hours including the following:

  1. ENGL 1301
  2. Humanities/Fine Arts:  One course from the list below  
  3. Natural Sciences/Mathematics:  One course from the list below  
  4. Social & Behavioral Sciences:  One course from the list below
  5. An additional course from the lists below or SPCH 1315 or SPCH 1318 or EDUC 1300

Note: See individual AAS degree plans for specific requirements.


Composite Listing of General Education Courses

Humanities and Fine Arts

ARTS 1301

Art Appreciation

ARTS 1303

Art History I

ARTS 1304

Art History II

DANC 2303

Dance Appreciation I

DRAM 1310

Introduction to Theatre

DRAM 2361

History of the Theatre I

DRAM 2362

History of the Theatre II

DRAM 2366

Introduction to Cinema

ENGL 1302

Composition II

ENGL 2322

British Literature I

ENGL 2323

British Literature II

ENGL 2326

American Literature

ENGL 2332

World Literature I

ENGL 2333

World Literature II

HIST 2311

Western Civilization I

HIST 2312

Western Civilization II

HIST 2321

World Civilization I

HIST 2322

World Civilization II

MUSI 1306

Music Appreciation

PHIL 1301

Introduction to Philosophy

PHIL 2306

Introduction to Ethics

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

BIOL 1406

Biology for Science Majors I

BIOL 1407

Biology for Science Majors II

BIOL 1408

Biology for Non-Science Majors I

BIOL 1409

Biology for Non-Science Majors II

BIOL 2401

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

BIOL 2402

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

BIOL 2406

Environmental Biology

CHEM 1405

Introductory Chemistry I.

CHEM 1406

Introductory Chemistry I.

CHEM 1411

General Chemistry I

CHEM 1412

General Chemistry II

ENVR 1401

Environmental Science I

GEOL1301

Earth Science for Non-Science Majors I

GEOL 1403

Physical Geology

GEOL 1404

Historical Geology

GEOL 1405

Environmental Science

GEOL 2407

Geological Field Methods

MATH 1314

College Algebra

MATH 1316

Plane Trigonometry

MATH 1324

Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences

MATH 1325

Calculus for Business and Social Sciences

MATH 1332

Contemporary Mathematics

MATH 1342

Elementary Statistical Methods

MATH 1350

Fundamentals of Mathematics I

MATH 1351

Fundamentals of Mathematics II

MATH 2412

Pre-Calculus Math

MATH 2413

Calculus I

MATH 2414

Calculus II

MATH 2415

Calculus III

PHYS 1401

College Physics I

PHYS 1402

College Physics II

PHYS 1403

Stars and Galaxies

PHYS 1404

Solar System

PHYS 1405

Elementary Physics

PHYS 2425

University Physics I

PHYS 2426

University Physics II

Social and Behavioral Sciences

COMM 1307

Introduction to Mass Communications

CRIJ 1301

Introduction to Criminal Justice

ECON 1301

Introduction to Economics

ECON 2301

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 2302

Principles of Microeconomics

GEOG 1303

World Regional Geography

GOVT 2305

Federal Government  

GOVT 2306

Texas Government

HIST 1301

United States History I

HIST 1302

United States History II

PSYC 2301

General Psychology

PSYC 2314

Lifespan Growth and Development

SOCI 1301

Introductory Sociology

SOCI 1306

Social Problems

SOCI 2301

Marriage and the Family

TECA 1354

Child Growth and Development


Certificate of Completion

KC offers certificates designed to meet specific needs of the community. Upon completion of a prescribed course of study with at least a 2.0 grade point average (GPA), the student receives a Certificate of Completion. Please refer to individual degree plans for specific certificate requirements.


ACADEMIC FIELDS OF STUDY 

Community colleges do not require students to declare "majors", but there are suggested courses to take in preparation for a major. Students are encouraged to work closely with college counselors or advisors in choosing the proper courses in line with both their desired major and the senior institution to which they wish to transfer.

Senate Bill 148 of the 75th Texas Legislature (1997) and the subsequent legislation mandate field of study curricula. A field of study curriculum, in conjunction with the core curriculum, is intended to facilitate transferability of courses among Texas public colleges and universities. All public 4-year institutions are required to accept Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) approved field of study courses in fulfillment of lower division requirements for bachelor's degrees in majors that correspond to that field of study.

In some disciplines, the student may take certain additional courses that, along with the core curriculum and field of study curriculum, will result in an associate of arts degree in that discipline. These are listed adjacent to their corresponding field of study curriculum. 

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Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Business Administration

 View/Print Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Business Administration (pdf)


Field of Study for Journalism/Mass Communications

 View/Print Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Communications: Journalism/Mass Communications (pdf)


Field of Study Curriculum for Computer Science

 View/Print Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Computer Science (pdf)


Field of Study Curriculum for Criminal Justice

 View/Print Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Criminal Justice (pdf)


Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Engineering

 View/Print Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Engineering (pdf)


Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Music

 View/Print Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Music (pdf)


Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Nursing

 View/Print Field of Study Transfer Curriculum for Nursing (pdf)


Nursing Content Courses

NOTE: Lower-division nursing content is offered at community colleges through one of two general types of programs: Blocked or Integrated Concept-Based. Because of the distribution of content, it is extremely difficult to align curricula from one type of program to another. Students who desire to transfer from a program utilizing one type of program into the other type of program should be prepared to make up some content through a "bridge" course or through the repetition of some content within courses. It is recommended that a student make every effort to avoid transferring from one type of program to the other before completing the associate degree in nursing in order not to lose credit.

Lower-division nursing content courses being transferred from a blocked curriculum program to another blocked-curriculum program should be applied to the degree on a course-for-course substitution basis, in which the course transferred is applied IN LIEU OF the course at the receiving institution, even if the number of semester credit hours awarded upon the completion of the course varies between the sending and receiving institutions.

The same procedure should be used when a student transfers from an integrated-curriculum program into another integrated-curriculum program.

INTEGRATED CONCEPT BASED CURRICULUM:

Content
Area

WECM Course Rubric & Number

SCH Range (Required
Clinical Corequisite)

Professional Nursing Competencies

Introduction to Health Care Concepts

Health Care Concepts I

Professional Nursing Concepts I

Clinical-Registered Nursing

RNSG 1X16

RNSG 1X28

RNSG 1X30

RNSG 1X25

RNSG 11XX

8 -32 hrs Lab

 

4-8 hrs of Lab

 

3-36 hrs if clinical

Health Care Concepts II

Professional Nursing Concepts II

Clinical-Registered Nursing

RNSG 1X33

RNSG 1X26

RNSG 23XX

4-8 hrs of Lab

 

3-36 hrs of clinical

Health Care Concepts III

Professional Nursing Concepts IIII

Clinical-Registered Nursing

RNSG 1X38

RNSG 1X37

RNSG 23XX

4-8 hrs of Lab

 

3-36 hrs of clinical

Health Care Concepts IV

Professional Nursing Concepts IV

Clinical-Registered Nursing

RNSG 2X39

RNSG 2X38

RNSG 23XX

4-8 hrs of Lab

 

3-36 hrs of clinical

The following notes address special circumstances and are also part of the field of study curriculum:

  1. Wherever possible, courses applied to fulfill field of study curriculum requirements should also be used to satisfy requirements in the general academic core curriculum. Generally, the math course, the biology or chemistry course(s), and one psychology course should be able to fulfill requirements in both curricula.
  2. Courses selected for inclusion in the field of study curriculum are those that are common to most baccalaureate nursing programs.
  3. Completion of the field of study curriculum shall not prevent a receiving institution from requiring additional courses/content for specific degree programs.
  4. Students should not be required to repeat courses that they have completed successfully.

The academic courses and the unmodified WECM courses that are included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Nursing should transfer immediately upon approval of the field of study curriculum by the Coordinating Board. New WECM courses and courses that need modification should be accepted in transfer as soon as those modifications have been approved by the WECM Maintenance committee and added to the WECM inventory. Implementation of the complete field of study curriculum should not take more than one calendar year following addition of the new and modified courses to the WECM inventory. New or modified WECM courses will be initiated with entering students. Programs may allow sophomore students to continue with the previous curricula to prevent changing courses in the middle of their programs. Full implementation of new and modified WECM courses must be complete within two years after their addition to the WECM inventory.

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TRANSFER COURSES BY MAJOR 

The courses listed in this section by major are intended to illustrate the nature of the work required in many fields of preparation provided by four-year colleges and universities. These suggested electives are designed for students who plan to transfer. Because senior college requirements vary, students should consult the catalog of the senior college of their choice before selecting electives. The number following the academic field is the major code number.

Click here to view the transfer courses by major (pdf)

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WORKFORCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS

The individual degree plans listed on the following pages outline major areas of concentration and designate the number of credits in each discipline required to obtain a degree or certificate from Kilgore College. The Associate of Applied Science degree and certificates of completion offered by KC are competency-based, designed to meet the employment needs of the area for a skilled workforce while meeting a broad spectrum of student interests, abilities and needs. Each workforce education certificate and degree is approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and the KC Board of Trustees. These programs also meet the Guarantee for Job Competency explained in the section "Academic Policies." Although general education courses in these programs are transferable to a bachelor’s degree, workforce education programs are not designed to transfer.

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Accounting +ACNT

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Accounting Associate of Applied Science degree is an accelerated two-year accounting program for people preparing for immediate careers in accounting. Students pursuing a bachelor's degree in accounting should see an advisor prior to registration.


 Accounting +ACND

37-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


 View/Print  Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Advertising/Graphic Design program offers the Associate of Applied Science degree, (designed for completion in four semesters), and a 30-hour Graphic Design certificate. These programs prepare students for entry-level graphic design careers in all areas of print and broadcast. The curricula cover the essentials of design and production. Students are required to purchase their own basic layout tools and supplies from a list made available on the first class day. 


Advertising/Graphic Design Technology +ADGR

30-Hour Certificate*
Graphic Design Option

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Automotive Body Repair Technology (ABDR)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

Automotive Body Repair Technology is intended to provide the student with detailed knowledge of Body-Over-Frame and Unitized-Construction techniques as they apply to the automobile. Focus will be on the repair and the replacement procedures used in the collision repair industry. 


Automotive Body Repair Technology (ABDF)

40 - Hour Certificate Program

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf).


Automotive Technology (AUMT/AUMI)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)

The program is designed to prepare its graduates to enter the rapidly changing automotive repair industry. The student will study each automobile system where he/she will learn the theory of operation along with the proper diagnostic procedure to repair a system problem. Each course will have a laboratory session where students will have an opportunity to practice the concepts and procedures studied in the classroom. Automotive Technology is an NATEF Certified Program.


Automotive Technology Certificate

42-Hour Certificate Program

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Business Management (BUSG)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

This two-year program leading to an Associate of Applied Science Degree prepares students for jobs in various areas of business including entry level management positions. It is not designed for transfer to a four-year school. Students pursuing a bachelor's degree should see an advisor prior to registration.


Business Management +BUSD

36-Hour Certificate of Completion

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Computer and Information Technology (CIT)

CIT – Computer Support Specialist +CSSP

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Computer and Information Technology program prepares students for careers in one of the fastest growing fields in the nation.  Students can earn a certificate and/or an associate of applied science degree in one of three specialties, each focused on a different set of skills and interests within the IT field.


CIT - Network Administration and Support +CNAS

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Network Administration and Support specialty prepares students to work as computer network support specialists, network administrators, or network security specialists. Students learn to install and configure network hardware and software, optimize network performance, maintain system security, and troubleshoot network problems.  Students have the option of taking the industry-recognized CompTIA A+, CCNA, and MCSA certification exams as well as pursuing an Enhanced Skills Certificate in Cybersecurity.


Enhanced Skills Certificate in Cybersecurity +CESC

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)

Students working toward an Associate of Applied Science degree in CIT – Network Administration and Support Specialty may also take the following courses.  A student who completes the required courses with an overall average of C may receive an Enhanced Skills Certificate in Cybersecurity.


CIT - Help Desk Technician Certificate +CHDT

Students may choose to earn a Help Desk Technician Certificate, which takes one year to complete.  Students may then take another year of courses to earn an AAS degree in either CIT – Computer Support Specialist or CIT – Network Administration and Support, or enter the work force as an entry-level Help Desk Technician.

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


CIT - Software Development & Support +CSDS

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Software Development and Support specialty prepares students to work as computer programmers, web developers, game developers, or application support specialists.  Students learn to write and test computer programs, develop and maintain web pages, create computer games, develop complex spreadsheets, and create SQL-based database reports.  Students have the option of taking the MCSA and MOS industry certification exams.


CIT - Software Support Certificate +CSWS

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)

Students may choose to earn the one-year Software Support Certificate and begin entry-level work in the software support field, or continue on to complete a second year of courses to receive the AAS degree in CIT – Software Development and Support.


Corrosion Technology (CORR)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

This two-year Associate of Applied Science degree prepares the student for the most common fields of corrosion control and integrity management. This highly specialized degree is suitable for careers in manufacturing companies, operating companies and government agencies. The program includes hands-on training with state-of-the-art equipment and computer-based research. There is a practical internship and opportunity to become certified by NACE International as a Level I Corrosion Technician and/or Level I Cathodic Protection Tester.  This degree also prepares the student for future certification as a NACE Level I Coatings Inspector, NACE Level I Internal Corrosion Technologist and/or NACE Level I PCIM Technician (see latest NACE certification requirements for details).


Corrosion Technology Certificate (CORE)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)

This one year certificate prepares the student to carry out corrosion work at a technician level, which primarily involves collection of data, installations, minor repairs, and coating inspection. There is an opportunity to become certified by NACE International as a NACE Level 1 Corrosion Technician and/or NACE Level I Cathodic Protection Tester. It also prepares the student for future certification as a NACE Level I Coating Inspector, NACE Level I Internal Corrosion Technologist, and/or NACE Level I PCIM Technician (See latest NACE certification requirements for details.)

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Cosmetology (CSMC)

The Cosmetology Program contains three certificates of completion. The Operator Certificate prepares students to take the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation examination for the operator license and for managing a business. Classes begin in August and January.


Operator Certificate

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Nail Technology (CSMD)

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)

The Nail Technology certificate prepares students to take the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation examination for the manicuring license. Classes begin in August and the following May.  


Facial Specialist (CSME)

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)

The Esthetician/Facial certificate prepares students to take the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation examination for the facial specialty license. Classes begin in August.

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Criminal Justice (Police Science) (CRIJ)

 View/Print  Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

This program leading to an Associate of Applied Science Degree prepares students for licensure as Texas peace officers. It is not designed for transfer to a four-year university. Students pursuing a bachelor's degree should see an advisor prior to registration. Entry and continued participation in this program are restricted to persons who meet the eligibility requirements set out in Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE) Rules §217.1, Minimum Standards for Enrollment and Initial Licensure. Current TCOLE rules may be found on the Commission's official website, http://tcole.texas.gov.


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Culinary Arts (CHEF)

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)


Culinary Arts (CHEB)

24-Hour Certificate 1

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Culinary Arts (CHEC)

21-Hour Certificate 2

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Diesel Technology (DEMR)

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The program prepares students to enter the workforce as entry-level technicians in the field of heavy equipment and truck repair. The program consists of a 12-month certificate and an associate of applied science degree.


Diesel Technology - Certificate (DEMC)

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Emergency Medical Services Professions (EMSP)

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print  Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Emergency Medical Services Professions Program prepares the student for a career in the diverse medical field of pre-hospital care as a certified/licensed paramedic.  At the different levels of the program, the student will be prepared to test for appropriate certification through the Texas Department of State Health Services.


EMT Certificate (EMSD)

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Paramedic Certificate (EMSE)

(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Fire Protection (FIRE)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)


Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (HART)

(Offered at KC - Longview)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration Program prepares students for entry-level work in the field of heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration. The curriculum consists of one certificate, which will lead directly to an associate of applied science degree.  Students are required to purchase their own basic hand tools from a list made available on the first class day. Classes begin every August.


HVACR Technician Certificate (HARG)

(Offered at KC - Longview)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Industrial Maintenance Technology (INMT)

(Offered at Kilgore College -- Longview)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Industrial Maintenance Technology Program prepares students for careers in large manufacturing companies as industrial machinery and maintenance technicians. Industrial maintenance technicians keep machinery and equipment in the plant up and running so that production can continue. The program consists of an associate of applied science degree and two certificates.


Industrial Maintenance Technology (INMC)

(Offered at Kilgore College - Longview) 
Entry Industrial Maintenance Technician - 27-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Industrial Maintenance Technology (INMD)

(Offered at Kilgore College -- Longview) 
Industrial Maintenance Technician - 18-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


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Instrumentation & Electrical Technology

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

Instrumentation and Electrical students will install, maintain and calibrate devices used in the automation of industrial processes.  These devices measure and control the pressure, temperature, level and flow of processes used in automated manufacturing and production.  Students will utilize piping process, chemical pneumatic, hydraulic, electrical, and electronic computer and networking technologies.


Instrumentation & Electrical Technology (IETE)

30-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Legal Assisting/Paralegal (LGLA)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Legal Assisting curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to work under the general direction of attorneys to assist them in the completion of legal tasks. The program provides knowledge and skills for employment in law firms, courts, utility companies, title companies, trusts and mortgage department of banks, government agencies and industrial companies.  


Legal Assisting/Paralegal (LGLC)

30-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Nursing Assistant (NUAS)

15-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)

This program is designed to prepare health science students with the entry-level skills required to function effectively as a nurse assistant in facilities such as nursing homes, hospitals, and physician's offices. Topics covered include medical terminology, medical law and ethics, human body systems, pharmacology, and nurse assisting skills. Upon completion of the program, graduates could be eligible to take the Texas Department of Health and Human Services written and skills evaluation for certification as a Certified Nurse Aide. For more information on this educational program select the corresponding link at www.kilgore.edu.


Nursing/Associate Degree (RNSA)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

Registered nurses (RNs) have excellent employment opportunities in our community, such as hospitals, clinics, physicians' offices, home health care and long-term-care facilities. For more information on this educational program select the corresponding link at www.kilgore.edu/adn.


Nursing/Transition Program (RNSB) - Begins Spring 2019

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

Nursing Transition ADN - (LVN-to-RN and Paramedic-to-RN) If you find yourself limited in your employment opportunities because of your level of education, consider returning to school to obtain your RN.  The Associate Degree Nursing Program values your previous education and experience, and gives you advanced placement. Upon graduation, you will be granted the Associate of Applied Science degree and will be eligible to take the National Council Licensure Exam (NCLEX) to obtain licensure as a Registered Nurse (RN). Applicants must have an unencumbered LVN license or Paramedic Certificate and have practiced as an LVN or Paramedic for one year.


Occupational Safety & Health Technology (OSHT)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

This program is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills required to work in the safety and environmental technology field. The student may choose a two-year Associate of Applied Science degree or a shorter one-year certificate. Both the degree and certificate program include a practical internship experience. The Kilgore College Occupational Safety and Health Technology is affiliated with the American Society of Safety Engineers, the world's oldest and largest professional safety organization. 


Occupational Safety & Health Technology Certificate (OSHC)

36-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Business Computer Office Management (POFT

Associate Degree
(Offered at KC - Longview)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)


Business Computer Office Management - Certificate

42-Hour Certificate of Completion
(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


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Physical Therapist Assistant (PTHA)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

This program offers training to become a licensed Physical Therapist Assistant working under the supervision of a physical therapist and assisting in implementing treatment programs according to the plan of care including training patients in exercises and functional activities, administering physical agents, and conducting other treatments. Physical therapist assistants must complete a two-year associate degree program and then pass a licensure exam. For more information on this educational program select the corresponding link at www.kilgore.edu.


Process Technology (PTAC)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The program is designed to prepare graduates for careers in chemical manufacturing, the oil and gas industry, power generation, food and beverage, mining, pharmaceuticals, pulp and paper, water, waste and waste water treatment. This two-year Associate of Applied Science degree program is recognized by the Texas Skills Standard Board and the North American Process Technology Alliance for meeting industry training standards.  Program graduates will have the opportunity for job placement with industry partners in the East Texas area, statewide, nationally and even globally.  The soft skills, technical knowledge and troubleshooting skills obtained in this program will give the graduates the tools needed to be successful entry level employees in the in the field of process technology.


Petroleum Specialty (PTAP)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The Petroleum Specialty degree graduates will be trained to the same industry skill level offered in the Process Technology degree.  This program will prepare students to operate in plants and with associated piping systems for the petroleum industry. The skills acquired will be those that are key to the production, operation, and distribution of petroleum products.


Radiologic Science (RADR)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

Radiography is a science combining advanced technology and human compassion. Radiographers use their knowledge of physics, human anatomy and physiology to create radiographic images. Radiologic services are offered in various healthcare settings. For more information on this educational program select the corresponding link at www.kilgore.edu/rad-science.


Radiologic Science - Computed Tomography (RADC)

15-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)

This program is designed to provide advanced professional training opportunities in Computed Tomography for imaging technologists who hold current certification in radiography from the ARRT. Computed Tomography is a highly technical x-ray imaging modality that uses special x-ray equipment combined with skilled technologists to obtain image data by moving the x-ray source and the sensor/detectors around the patient. Computer synthesized data is acquired from multiple angles and processed to show detailed cross-sections of body tissues and organs in various planes. For more information on this educational program select the corresponding link at www.kilgore.edu.


Nursing/Vocational (VNSG)

Preparation for LVN 
(Offered at KC-Longview)

 View/Print Degree Plan (pdf)

Vocational nursing prepares the graduate to function as a member of the nursing team in performing basic nursing skills independently in non-complex situations and to assist the registered nurse or physician in complex nursing situations. This program is accredited by the Texas Board of Nursing. Graduates are eligible to take the state examination for licensure. The twelve-month program is taught in three semesters for a total of 47 credit hours. New classes start in August and in January. Pretesting for admission occurs monthly; register at www.kilgore.edu/lvn. Check college schedule for optional pre-requisite offerings. A certificate of completion may be awarded upon successful completion of course requirements. 


Welding Technology (WLDG)

 View/Print Associate Degree Plan (pdf)

The growing demand for qualified welders has necessitated the availability of a curriculum designed to meet the needs of the welding industry. Students graduating from the program will be skillful and have a good understanding of the related and technical information associated with welding. Graduates should be qualified to pass the entry-level certification tests as required by industry. 


Basic Welding (WLDB)

Basic Welding - 22-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


Advanced Welding (WLDC)

Advanced Welding - 41-Hour Certificate

 View/Print Certificate Plan (pdf)


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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

EXPLANATION OF ITEMS IN COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:

Course Prefix: ACNT
Course Number: 1303
Course Title: Introduction to Accounting I
Semester Hour Credit:  (3-3-0)
Lecture Hours Each Week: (3-3-0)
Lab Hours Each Week: (3-3-0)
Course Description                                                            
When Course Generally Offered:

  • F=Fall
  • Sp=Spring
  • Su=Summer

Coordinating Board Approval Number:  (5203010004)

Note: KC uses the Texas Common Course Numbering System.

  • (T) after the course number indicates an academic course that is designed to transfer to a bachelor’s degree program. Students should check with the transfer institution to verify applicability to their specific major. 
  • (NT) after the course number indicates a workforce course that is not designed to transfer to a bachelor’s degree program. 

 ACCOUNTING (ACCT, ACNT)

ACCT 2401. (T)

Principles of Financial  Accounting.   (4-3-3)

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of financial accounting as prescribed by U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) as applied to transactions and events that affect business organizations. Students will examine the procedures and systems to accumulate, analyze, measure, and record financial transactions. Students will use recorded financial information to prepare a balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of shareholders’ equity to communicate the business entity’s results of operations and financial position to users of financial information who are external to the company. Students will study the nature of 

assets, liabilities, and owners’ equity while learning to use reported financial information for purposes of making decisions about the company. Students will be exposed to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite courses, and concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0307. Course fee $50. F, Sp, (5203015104).

 

ACCT 2402. (T)

Principles of Managerial  Accounting.    (4-3-3)

This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts of managerial accounting appropriate for all organizations. Students will study information from the entity's accounting system relevant to decisions made by internal managers, as distinguished from information relevant to 

users who are external to the company. The emphasis is on the identification and assignment of product costs, operational budgeting and planning, cost control, and management decision making. Topics include product costing methodologies, cost behavior, operational and capital budgeting, and performance evaluation. Prerequisite: "C" or better in ACCT 2401 Course fee $50. F, Sp, Su (5203015104).

 

ACNT 1303. (NT) 

Introduction to Accounting I.   (3-3-0)            

A study of analyzing, classifying, and recording business transactions in a manual and computerized environment. Emphasis on understanding the complete accounting cycle and preparing financial statements, bank reconciliation, and payroll. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 and ENGL 0307. F, Sp (5203020004).

 

ACNT 1304. (NT)  

Introduction to Accounting II.   (3-3-0)

A study of accounting for merchandising, notes payable, notes receivable, valuation of receivables and equipment, and valuation of inventories in a manual and computerized environment. Prerequisite: "C" or better in ACNT 1303. Sp (5203020004).

 

ACNT 1311. (NT)        

Introduction to Computerized  Accounting.   (3-3-0)

Introduction to utilizing the computer in maintaining accounting records with primary emphasis on a general ledger package. Prerequisite: C or better in ACNT 1303 or ACCT 2401. Keyboarding proficiency is recommended. Course fee $50. F (5203020004).

 

ACNT 1329. (NT)   

Payroll & Business Tax  Accounting.   (3-3-0)                                 

A study of payroll procedures, taxing entities, and reporting requirements of local, state, and federal taxing authorities in a manual and computerized environment. Prerequisite: C or better in ACNT 1303 and either BCIS 1305 or ITSW 1304. Course fee $50. F (5203010004).

 

ACNT 1331. (NT)   

Federal Income Tax: Individual.   (3-3-0)

A study of the federal tax law for preparation of individual income tax returns. Prerequisite: C or better in ACNT 1303 or ACCT 2401. Course fee $50. Sp (5216010004).

 

ACNT 1413. (NT)     

Computerized Accounting  Applications.   (4-4-0)

Use of the computer to develop and maintain accounting records and to process common business applications for managerial decision-making.  Prerequisite: C or better in ACNT 

1304 or ACCT 2401 and ACNT 1311. Course fee $50. Sp (5203020004).

 

ACNT 2388. (NT)  

Internship - Accounting.     (3-0-11)

A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer. Prerequisite: ACT 2402. F, Sp (5203010004).


 ADVERTISING/GRAPHIC DESIGN TECHNOLOGY (ARTC, ARTV, IMED)

ARTC 1302. (NT)

Digital Imaging I.    (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 2325) Digital imaging using raster image editing and/or image creation software: scanning, resolution, file formats, output devices, color systems, and image 

acquisitions. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $35 Sp, F (5004090000). 

 

ARTC 1309. (NT)

Basic Illustration.        (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 1316) Introduction to drawing techniques as they pertain to the commercial illustration industry. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $35. Sp, F (5004020000). 

 

ARTC 1313. (NT)

Digital Publishing I.       (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 2314) The fundamentals of using digital layout as a primary publishing tool and the basic concepts and terminology associated with typography and page layout. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Prerequisite: ARTC 1325 or consent of instructor. Course fee $35. F (5004090000). 

 

ARTC 1317. (NT)

Design Communication I.    (3-2-4)

Study of design development relating to graphic design terminology, tools and media, and layout and design concepts. Topics include integration of type, images and other design elements, and developing computer skills in industry standard computer programs. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Course fee $35. (5004090000).

 

ARTC 1325. (NT)

Introduction to Computer  Graphics.      (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 1313) A survey of computer design concepts, terminology, processes, and procedures. Topics include computer graphics 

hardware, electronic images, electronic publishing, vector-based graphics, and interactive multimedia. Student must be TSI complete in Reading or have concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301.  Course fee $35. (5004090000). 

 

ARTC 1349. (NT)

Art Direction I.      (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 2310) Creation of projects in art direction for advertising graphic campaigns encompassing products, services, or ideas. Topics include all campaign procedures from initial research and creative strategy to final execution of a comprehensive project. Student must be TSI complete in Reading or have concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301. Prerequisite: ARTC 2317 Typographic Design, ARTS 2313 Design Communication I. Course fee $35. F (5004020000). 

 

ARTC 2301. (NT)

Illustration Techniques II.       (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 2312) Continued study of illustration media and techniques using digital and/or traditional tools. Emphasis on conceptualization and composition. Student must be TSI complete in Reading or have concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301. Course fee $35. F (5004020000). 

 

ARTC 2305. (NT)

Digital Imaging II.      (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 2326) Principles of digital image processing and electronic painting. 

Emphasis on bitmapped - or raster based image marking and the creative aspects of electronic illustration for commercial and fine art applications. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Prerequisite: ARTC 1302 or consent of instructor. Course fee $35. Sp (5004090000).

 

ARTC 2317. (NT)

Typographic Design.     (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 1315) Exploration of problems in typographic design including computer generated letterforms as elements of design. Includes theory and techniques of traditional, contemporary, and experimental typography. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Prerequisite: ARTC 1325. Course fee $35. F, Sp (5004090000). 

 

ARTC 2335. (NT)

Portfolio Development for  Graphic Design.    (3-2-4)

Preparation of a portfolio comprised of completed graphic design projects. Evaluation and demonstration of portfolio presentation methods based on the student's specific area of study. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and consent of instructor. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $35. Sp only (5004020000).

 

ARTC 2349. (NT)

Art Direction II.    (3-2-4)

(Formerly AGDT 2314) Mastery of advanced art direction projects with emphasis on selected topics in advertising campaigns. Topics include written, oral and visual skills. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Prerequisite: Course fee $35. Sp (5004020000).

 

ARTV 1351. (NT)

Digital Video.    (3-2-4)

Producing and editing video and sound for multimedia or web productions. Emphasizes capture, editing, and outputting of video using a digital video workstation. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $35. Sp (1003040000). 

 

ARTV 2301. (NT)

2-D Animation.    (3-2-4)

Skill development in the use of software to develop storyboards and two-dimensional animation including creating, importing, and sequencing media elements to create multimedia presentation. Emphasis on conceptualization, creativity, and visual aesthetics. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $35. (1003040000).

 

IMED 1316. (NT)

Web Design I.   (3-2-4)

Instruction in web page design and related graphic design issues including mark-up languages, web sites, and browsers. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Prerequisite: ARTC 1302. Course fee $35. F, Sp (1108010007).

 

IMED 1341. (NT)

Interface Design.    (3-2-4)

Skill development in the interface design process including selecting interfaces relative to a project's content and delivery system. Emphasis on aesthetic issues such as iconography, screen composition, colors, and typography. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $35. F (1108010000).

 

IMED 2315. (NT)

Web Design II.     (3-2-4)

Mark-up language and advanced layout techniques for creating web pages. Emphasis on identifying the target audience and producing web sites, according to accessibility standards, cultural appearance, and legal issues. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Prerequisite: IMED 1316. Course fee $35. F, Sp (1108010007).


ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS - See Communications


ARTS (ARTS)

ARTS 1301. (T)          

Art Appreciation.   (3-3-0)

A general introduction to the visual arts designed to create an appreciation of the vocabulary, media, techniques, and purposes of the creative process. Students will critically interpret and evaluate works of art within formal, cultural, and historical contexts. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (5007035126).

 

ARTS 1303. (T)          

Art History I.     (3-3-0)

A chronological analysis of the historical and cultural contexts of the visual arts from prehistoric times to the 14th century. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.F (5007035226).

 

 ARTS 1304. (T)         

 Art History II.     (3-3-0)

A chronological analysis of the historical and cultural contexts of the visual arts from the 14th century to the present day. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (5007035226).

 

 ARTS 1311. (T)         

 Design I.     (3-2-4)

An introduction to the fundamental terminology, concepts, theory, and application of two-dimensional design. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in to enroll in ENGL 0307. F, Sp (5004015326).

 

ARTS 1312. (T)         

Design II.     (3-2-4)

An introduction to the fundamental terminology, concepts, theory, and application of three-dimensional design. Prerequisite:

ARTS 1311. Course fee $35. Sp (5004015326).

 

ARTS 1316. (T).        

Drawing I.     (3-2-4)

A foundation studio course exploring drawing with emphasis on descriptive, expressive and conceptual approaches. Students will learn to see and interpret a variety of subjects while using diverse materials and techniques. Course work will facilitate a dialogue in which students will engage in critical analysis and begin to develop their understanding of drawing as a discipline. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. F, Sp (5007055226).

 

ARTS 1317. (T)       

Drawing II.      (3-2-4)

A studio course exploring drawing with continued emphasis on descriptive, expressive and conceptual approaches. Students will further develop the ability to see and interpret a variety of subjects while using diverse materials and techniques. Course work will facilitate a dialogue in which students will employ critical analysis to broaden their understanding of drawing as a discipline. Prerequisite: ARTS 1316. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Sp (5007055226).

 

ARTS 2313. (T)         

Design Communications I.      (3-2-4)

Communication of ideas through processes and techniques of graphic design and illustration. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Course fee $35. F (5004015126).

 

ARTS 2314. (T)          

Design Communications II.    (3-2-4)

Communication of ideas through processes and techniques of graphic design and illustration. Further studies in graphic communication with emphasis on graphic layout for advertising art. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Prerequisite: ARTS 2313 or equivalent. Course fee $35. Sp (5004015126).

 

ARTS 2316. (T)          

Painting I.     (3-2-4)

Exploration of ideas using painting media and techniques. Introduction to basic principles of mixing and application of opaque painting media on various painting surfaces. Course work includes studies in the properties of the media with various subject matters and the study of various styles of painting. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: ARTS 1316 and eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Sp (5007085226).

 

ARTS 2317. (T)          

Painting II.     (3-2-4)

Exploration of ideas using painting media and techniques. Continuation of ARTS 2316 with emphasis on experimentation with style and media. Prerequisite: ARTS 2316 or the instructor's approval. Course fee $35. F (5007085226).

 

ARTS 2326. (T)         

Sculpture I.    (3-2-4)

Exploration of ideas using sculpture media and techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 1311 and/or the instructor's approval. Course fee $45. F (5007095126).

 

ARTS 2389. (T)          

Academic Cooperative.    (3-2-4)

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical, hands-on experience. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual student will set specific goals and objectives in the study of studio art and/or art history. Prerequisite: instructor's consent. Course fee $35. Offered as needed. (2401035212).


AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR TECHNOLOGY (ABDR)

ABDR 1307. (NT)   

Collision Repair Welding.    (3-2-4)

A study of collision repair welding and cutting procedures. Prerequisite: ABDR 1315. Course fee $200. Sp (4706030020).

 

ABDR 1311. (NT)  

Vehicle Measurement and Damage Repair Procedures.   (3-2-2)

Introduction to damaged vehicle measurement and structural alignment equipment. Prerequisite: ABDR 1315. Course fee $150. Sp (4706030020).

 

ABDR 1315. (NT)  

Vehicle Trim and Hardware.   (3-2-2)

A study of vehicle trim and glass service. Prerequisite: Must be eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Course fee $150. F (4706030020).

 

ABDR 1419. (NT)  

Basic Metal Repair.      (4-2-6)

Covers metal principles and working techniques including proper tool usage and product application. Prerequisite: Must be eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Course fee $150. F (4706030020).

 

ABDR 1431. (NT)  

Basic Refinishing.     (4-3-3)

An introduction to current refinishing products, shop safety, and equipment used in the automotive refinishing industry. Emphasis on surface preparation, masking techniques, and refinishing of replacement parts. Prerequisite: ABDR 1315, and ABDR 1455. Course fee $150. Su (4706030020).

 

ABDR 1441. (NT)  

Structural Analysis and Damage Repair I.      (4-3-3)

Training in the roughing and shaping procedures on automotive sheet metal necessary to perform body repairs. Emphasis on the alignment of component parts such as doors, hood, front-end assemblies, and deck lids. Prerequisite: ABDR 1455 and ABDR 1449. Course fee $150. Sp (4706030020).

 

ABDR 1442. (NT)  

Structural Analysis and Damage Repair II.     (4-3-3)

Continuation of general repair and replacement procedures for damaged structural parts and collision damage. Prerequisite: ABDR 1441. Course fee $150. Sp (4706030020).

 

ABDR 1449. (NT)  

Automotive Plastic and Sheet Molded Compound Repair.     (4-2-6)

A comprehensive course in repair of interior and exterior plastics including the use of various types of adhesives. Prerequisite: Must be eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Course fee $150. F (4706030020).

 

ABDR 1455. (NT)  

Non-Structural Metal Repair.     (4-2-6)

Demonstrate sheet metal repair skills using mechanical and hydraulic equipment. Emphasis on attachment devices used to straighten and align exterior body panels. Prerequisite: Must be eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Course fee $150. F (4706030020).

 

ABDR 2257. (NT)  

Collision Repair Shop Management.       (2-2-1)

Examination of shop management functions and decision-making processes including planning, organizing, leading and staffing used in collision repair shops to ensure operational profitability. Prerequisite: Must be eligible to enroll in MATH 1332 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $150. Sp (4706030020).

 

ABDR 2355. (NT)   

Collision Repair Estimating.      (3-2-2)

An advanced course in collision estimating and development of a damage report utilizing estimating software. Prerequisite: Must be eligible to enroll in MATH 1332. Course fee $150. Sp (4706030020).

 

ABDR 2380. (NT)   

Cooperative Education-Autobody/ Collision and Repair Technology/ Technician.          (3-1-20)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. F, Sp, Su (4706030020).

 

ABDR 2431. (NT)   

Structural Analysis and Damage Repair III.      (4-3-3)

Advanced concepts theories of auto body repair and replacement of major body units. Prerequisite: ABDR 1442. Course fee $150. Sp (4706030020).


AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOY (AUMT)

AUMT 1306. (NT) 

Automotive Engine Removal and Installation.   (3-1-7)

Fundamentals of engine inspection, removal and installation procedures. May be taught manufacturer specific. Prerequisite: AUMT 1312. Course fee $50. Su (4706040020).

 

AUMT 1307. (NT) 

Automotive Electrical Systems.       (3-1-7)        

An overview of the automotive electrical systems including topics in operational theory, testing, diagnosis, and repair of charging and starting systems, and electrical accessories. Emphasis is on electrical principles, schematic diagrams and service manuals. May be taught with manufacturer specific. Prerequisite: Bennett Mechanical Aptitude Testing score of 42 or above and eligibility to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307/MATH Pathways.. Co-requisite: AUMT 1405. Course fee $50. Uniform fee $30. F (4706040020).

 

AUMT 1312. (NT) 

Basic Automotive Service.      (3-1-7)

Basic automotive service. Includes compliance with safety and hazardous material handling procedures and maintenance of shop equipment. Prerequisite: Bennett Mechanical Aptitude Testing score of 42 or above and eligibility to enroll in ENGL 0307. Co-requisite: AUMT 1405.  Course fee $50. Scan Tool fee $50. F (4706040020).

 

AUMT 1316. (NT) 

Automotive Suspension & Steering Systems.        (3-1-7)

Diagnosis and repair of automotive suspension and steering systems including electronically controlled systems. Includes component repair, alignment procedures and tire and wheel service. May be taught manufacturer specific. Prerequisite: AUMT 1405. Course fee $50. Sp (4706040020).

 

AUMT 1345.  (NT) 

Automotive Climate Control Systems.      (3-2-4)

Diagnosis and repair of manual/electronic climate control systems. Includes the refrigeration cycle and EPA guidelines for refrigerant handling. May be taught manufacturer specific. After successful completion of the heating and air conditioning class, the student will be eligible for the automotive air conditioning recovery and recycle license. Prerequisites: AUMT 1307. Course fee $50. Su (4706040020).

 

AUMT 1405.  (NT) 

Introduction to Automotive Technology.     (4-2-6)

An introduction to the automotive industry including automotive history, safety practices, shop equipment and tools, vehicle subsystems, service publications, professional responsibilities, and basic automotive maintenance. May be taught manufacturer specific. Prerequisite: Bennett Mechanical Aptitude Testing score of 42 or above and eligibility to enroll in ENGL 0307. Course fee $50. Uniform fee $30. F (4706040000).

 

AUMT 1410. (NT) 

Automotive Brake Systems.      (4-2-6)

Operation and repair of drum/disc type brake systems. Topics include brake theory, diagnosis, and repair of power, manual, anti-lock brake systems, and parking brakes. May be taught with manufacturer specific instructions. Co-requisite: AUMT 1405. Course fee $50. ASE Testing fee $30. F (4706040020).

 

AUMT 2301. (NT)

Automotive Management.    (3-3-0)

Study of human and customer relations, and customer satisfaction in the automotive service industry.  Emphasis on management and building relationships between the service department and the customer. Sp (4706040020).

 

AUMT 2317.   (NT) 

Automotive Engine Performance Analysis I.       (3-1-7)

Theory, operation, diagnosis of drivability concerns, and repair of ignition and fuel delivery systems. Use of current engine performance diagnostic equipment. May be taught with manufacturer specific instructions. Prerequisites: AUMT 1307. Course fee $50. Sp (4706040020).

 

AUMT 2321. (NT) 

Automotive Electrical Diagnosis and Repair.    (3-1-7)

Repair of automotive electrical subsystems, lighting, instrumentation, and accessories. Emphasis on accurate diagnosis and proper repair methods using various troubleshooting skills and techniques. May be taught manufacturer specific. Prerequisite: AUMT 1307. Course fee $50. Sp (4706040020).

 

AUMT 2371. (NT) 

Power Train Application I.   (3-2-4)

In-depth coverage of the mechanics and theory of power trains. Emphasis on disassembly, ins pection, and repair of power train components. May be taught manufacturer specific. Prerequisite: AUMT 1312. Course fee $50. Su (4706040020).

 

AUMT 2380.   (NT) 

Cooperative Education – Automobile /Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician.    (3-1-20)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. F, Sp, Su (4706040020).

 

AUMT 2381.   (NT) 

Cooperative Education – Automobile /Automotive Mechanics Technology/Technician.   (3-1-20)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisite: AUMT 2380.

F, Sp, Su (4706040020).

 

AUMT 2434. (NT) 

Automotive Engine Performance Analysis II.     (4-2-6)

Diagnosis and repair of emission systems, computerized engine performance systems, and advanced ignition and fuel systems. Includes use of advanced engine performance diagnostic equipment. May be taught manufacturer specific. Prerequisite: AUMT 2317. Course fee $50. Sp (4706040020).


BIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (BIOL, ENVR)

BIOL 1322. (T)

Nutrition & Diet Therapy      (3-3-0)

This course introduces general nutritional concepts in health and disease and includes practical applications of that knowledge.  Special emphasis is given to nutrients and nutritional processes including functions, food sources, digestion, absorption, and metabolism.  Food safety, availability, and nutritional information including food labels, advertising, and nationally established guidelines are addressed.  Study of the chemical, physical, and sensory properties of food; nutritional quality; and food use and diet applications.  Course fee $75. F, Sp, Su (1905015109).

 

BIOL 1406. (T)

Biology for Science Majors I.    (4-3-3)

Fundamental principles of living organisms will be studied, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included.  Laboratory activities will reinforce the fundamental principles of living organisms, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification.  Study and examination of the concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included. Prerequisite: TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $100. F, Sp, Su (2601015103).

 

BIOL 1407. (T)

Biology for Science Majors II.   (4-3-3)

The diversity and classification of life will be studied, including animals, plants, protists, fungi, and prokaryotes. Special emphasis will

be given to anatomy, physiology, ecology, and evolution of plants and animals. It is designed for biological science majors and all pre-professional health occupations majors who plan to transfer to an upper level institution. It will satisfy the basic science requirement for upper level courses. Prerequisite: TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Course fee $100. F (2601015103).

 

BIOL 1408. (T)

Biology for Non-Science Majors I.      (4-3-3)

Provides a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including chemistry of life, cells, structure, function, and reproduction. This course is designed to fulfill four credit hours of a non-science major's laboratory science requirement.  It will not satisfy the requirements for science majors.  Prerequisite: TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $75. F, Sp, Su (2601015103).

 

BIOL 1409. (T)

Biology for Non-Science Majors II.      (4-3-3)

This course will provide a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including evolution, ecology, plant and animal diversity, and physiology.  This course is designed to fulfill four credit hours of a non-science major's laboratory science requirement. It will not satisfy the requirement for science majors. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301 and eligible to enroll in MATH 0307. Course fee $75. F, Sp, Su (2601015103).

 

BIOL 2389. (T)

Academic Cooperative.    (3-0-9)

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on work experience in the biological sciences/life sciences. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual student will set specific goals and objectives in the study of living organisms and their systems. Prerequisite: "C" or better in BIOL 1406 or BIOL 1407. Students must be TSI complete in Reading, Writing and Math. Course fee $75. F, Sp (2601015103).

 

BIOL 2401. (T)

Human Anatomy and Physiology I.        (4-3-4)

Anatomy and Physiology I is the first part of a two course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including cells, tissues and organs of the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special senses. Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Prerequisite:  “C” or better in CHEM 1411 or CHEM 1406 or BIOL 2404 or BIOL 1406 or BIOL 1408 or BIOL 1409 and must be TSI complete in reading, writing, and eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite course, MATH 1332, MATH 1342 or have approval from the instructor.  It is strongly advised that the students have no math remediation for this course. Course fee $150. F, Sp, Su (2607075103).

 

BIOL 2402. (T)

Human Anatomy and Physiology II.     (4-3-4)

Anatomy and Physiology II is the second part of a two-course sequence. It is a study of the structure and function of the human body including the following systems: endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive (including nutrition), urinary (including fluid and electrolyte balance), and reproductive (including human development and genetics). Emphasis is on interrelationships among systems and regulation of physiological functions involved in maintaining homeostasis. Prerequisite:  “C” or better in BIOL 2401 and must be TSI complete in READ, WRIT, and MATH.    Course fee $150. F, Sp, Su (2607075103).

 

BIOL 2404. (T)

Anatomy & Physiology.   (4-3-3)

Study of the structure and function of human anatomy, including the neuroendocrine, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, urinary, reproductive, respiratory, and circulatory systems.  A broad spectrum introduction to the study of biology as it pertains to the allied health science occupations.  Content will include the basic principles of physiology at the cell and molecular occupations.  This course meets requirements for Kilgore College Human Anatomy and Physiology I, a requirement for the associate degree allied health programs and Kinesiology.  This course is designed to fulfill four credit hours of select health science major’s laboratory science requirement. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ, MATH, and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301 and eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite course.  Course fee $75. F, S, Su (2607075103).

 

BIOL 2406. (T)

Environmental Biology.   (4-3-3)

Principles of environmental systems and ecology, including biogeochemical cycles, energy transformations, abiotic interactions, symbiotic relationships, natural resources and their management, lifestyle analysis, evolutionary trends, hazards and risks, and approaches to ecological research.  Human interaction with and effect upon plant and animal communities.  Conservation, pollution, energy, and other contemporary ecological problems.  Prerequisites: TSI complete in READ and WRIT and eligible to enroll in MATH 0307.  Recommended prerequisite:  MATH 1314 – Successful completion of College Algebra or concurrent enrollment in higher-level mathematics is recommended.  Course fee $75. F, Sp, Su (0301035101).

 

BIOL 2420. (T)

Microbiology for Non-Science Majors.    (4-3-4)

This course covers basic microbiology and immunology and is primarily directed at pre-nursing, pre-allied health, and non-science majors. It provides an introduction to historical concepts of the nature of microorganisms, microbial diversity, the importance of microorganisms and acellular agents in the biosphere, and their roles in human and animal diseases. Major topics include bacterial structure as well as growth, physiology, genetics, and biochemistry of microorganisms. Emphasis is on medical microbiology, infectious diseases, and public health. This course covers basics of culture and identification of bacteria and microbial ecology.  Prerequisites: "C" or better in BIOL 2401. BIOL 2402 and BIOL 2420 may be taken concurrently with permission from the  Biology Dept. Chair. Course fee $200. F, Sp,

 Su (2605035103).

 

ENVR 1401. (T)

Environmental Science I.    (4-3-3)

A survey of the forces, including humans, that shape our physical and biologic environment, and how they affect life on Earth. Introduction to the science and policy of global and regional environmental issues, including pollution, climate change, and sustainability of land, water, and energy resources.  General interest course requiring a minimum of previous science background and relating scientific knowledge to problems involving energy and the environment.  May or may not include a laboratory.  (Cross-listed as GEOL 1405 Environmental Science)  Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301 and MATH Co-requisite courses. Course fee $75. F, Sp, Su (0301035201).


BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (BMGT, BUSG, BUSI, HRPO, MRKG)

BUSG 1303. (NT)

Principles of Finance     (3-3-0)

Financial dynamics of a business.  Includes monetary and credit theory, cash inventory, capital management, and consumer and government finance.  Emphasizes the time value of money. F. (5201010004).

 

BUSG 1371. (NT)    

Business Mathematics Using Calculators.    (3-3-0)

A study of percentages, metrics, payroll, taxes, insurance, financial statements, interest, bank records, credit, and installment buying.  Electronic calculators are used and practice is required to attain speed and accuracy using the ten key keyboard by touch. F. (5201010004).

 

BUSG 2366 (NT)      

Practicum - Business/Commerce, General.   (3-0-21)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. A basic or intermediate type of non-health profession work-based instruction that provides basic career exploration or helps students gain practical experience in the discipline, enhanced skills, and integrates knowledge.  The emphasis is on practical work experience.  Indirect supervision is provided by the work supervisor.  A practicum may be a paid or unpaid learning experience.  F, Sp. (5201010004).

 

BUSG 2367 (NT)      

Practicum - Business/Commerce, General.    (3-0-21)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. A basic or intermediate type of non-health profession work-based instruction that provides basic career exploration or helps students gain practical experience in the discipline, enhanced skills, and integrates knowledge.  The emphasis is on practical work experience.  Indirect supervision is provided by the work supervisor.  A practicum may be a paid or unpaid learning experience.  Prerequisite: BUSG 2366. F, Sp. (5201010004).

 

BUSI 1301. (T)          

Business Principles.    (3-3-0)                                                   

This course provides a survey of economic systems, forms of business ownership, and considerations for running a business.  Students will learn various aspects of business, management, and leadership functions; organizational considerations; and decision-making processes.  Financial topics are introduced, including accounting, money and banking, and securities markets.  Also included are discussions of business challenges in the legal and regulatory environment, business ethics, social responsibility, and international business.  Emphasized is the dynamic role of business in everyday life.  F, Sp. (5201015104).

 

BUSI 1307. (T)           

Personal Finance.    (3-3-0)                                                            

Personal and family accounts, budgets and budgetary control, bank accounts, charge accounts, borrowing, investing, insurance, standards of living, renting or home ownership, and wills and trust plans. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in Co-requisite courses.  (1904015109).

 

BUSI 2301. (T)               

Business Law.     (3-3-0)                                                           

This course provides the student with foundational information about the U. S. legal system and dispute resolution, and their impact on business.  The major content areas will include general principles of law, the relationship of business and the U. S. Constitution, state and federal legal systems, the relationship between law and ethics, contracts, sales, torts, agency law, intellectual property, and business law in the global context.  F, Sp. (2201015124).

 

BUSI 2304. (T)            

Business Report Writing and Correspondence.    (3-3-0)

Theory and applications for technical reports and correspondence in business including written and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. F, Sp (2313035212).

 

BMGT 1301. (NT)     

Supervision.      (3-3-0)

A study of the role of the supervisor. Managerial functions as applied to leadership, counseling, motivation, and human relations skills are examined. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. F (5202010004).

 

BMGT 1327. (NT)    

Principles of Management.      (3-3-0)

(Formerly BMGT 1303) Concepts, terminology, principles, theories, and issues in the field of management. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. F (5202010004).

 

BMGT 1331. (NT)    

Production and Operations  Management.     (3-3-0)

Fundamentals of the various techniques used in the practice of production management to include location, design, and resource allocation. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307, ENGL 0307. Sp (5202050004).

 

BMGT 1368. (NT)    

Practicum-Business Administration and Management, General.       (3-0-21)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. F, Sp (5202010004).

 

BMGT 1369. (NT)    

Practicum-Business Administration and Management, General.       (3-0-21)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. Prerequisite: BMGT 1368. F, Sp (5202010004).

 

BMGT 2331. (NT)    

Principles of Quality Management.    (3-3-0)

Includes planning and implementing quality programs in an organization and analyzing cost/benefit of quality. Also covers the impact of employee empowerment. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Sp (5202010004).

 

BMGT 2368. (NT)     

Practicum-Business Administration and Management, General.    (3-0-21)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. Prerequisite: BMGT 1369. F, Sp (5202010004).

 

HRPO 2301. (NT)    

Human Resources Management.      (3-3-0)

Behavior and legal approaches to the management of human resources in organizations. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (5210010004).

 

HRPO 2307. (NT)    

Organizational Behavior.       (3-3-0)

The analysis and application of organizational theory, group dynamics, motivation theory, leadership concepts, and the integration of interdisciplinary concepts from the behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. F (5210030004).

 

MRKG 1311. (NT)   

Principles of Marketing.    (3-3-0)

Introduction to the marketing mix functions and process. Includes identification of consumer and organizational needs and explanation of environmental issues. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307.  Sp (5214010004).

 

MRKG 2333. (NT)    

Principles of Selling.    (3-3-0)

(Formerly BMGT 1333) Overview of the selling process. Identification of the elements of the communication process between buyers and sellers. Examination of the legal regulations and ethical issues of organizations which affect salespeople. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Sp (5214010004).


 

CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

CHEM 1405. (T)        

Introductory Chemistry I. (lecture + lab)   (4-3-3)

Survey course introducing chemistry.  Topics may include inorganic, organic, biochemistry, food/physiological chemistry, and environmental/consumer chemistry.  Designed for allied health students and for students who are not science majors. Introductory topics in chemistry are covered from a largely conceptual point of view. This course meets a four-hour lab-science requirement for non-science majors Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $75. F, Sp, Su (40.0501.51 03).

 

CHEM 1406. (T)        

Introductory Chemistry I. (lecture + lab, allied health emphasis)    (4-3-3)

Survey course introducing chemistry.  Topics may include inorganic, organic, biochemistry, food/physiological chemistry, and environmental/consumer chemistry.  Designed for allied health students and for students who are not science majors. Specific topics covered will include measurement and unit conversion, atomic and molecular structure of matter, chemical reactions, solutions, acid/base chemistry, nuclear chemistry, thermochemistry, organic chemistry and structure of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in lecture will be included.  This class will satisfy prerequisites for Health Science courses as well as fulfill 4 hours of General Education laboratory science. Prerequisite: MATH 0307 and must be TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $75. F, Sp, Su (40.0501.51 03).

 

CHEM 1407. (T)

Introductory Chemistry II for Corrosion Majors (lecture + lab)    (4-3-3)

Survey course introducing chemistry. Topics may include inorganic, organic, biochemistry, food/physiological chemistry, and environmental/consumer chemistry. Designed for non-science and allied health students. This course is designed to emphasize chemical equilibrium with respect to metal precipitation; phase diagrams; acid-base concepts; thermodynamics; kinetics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; organic chemistry and polymer chemistry as it pertains to the corrosion field. Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in lecture will be included.  Prerequisite:  CHEM 1411.  Course fee $75.  Sp. (40.0501.51 03).

 

CHEM 1411. (T)        

General Chemistry I. (lecture + lab)     (4-3-3)

Fundamental principles of chemistry for majors in the sciences, health sciences, and engineering; topics include measurements, fundamental properties of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, chemical stoichiometry, periodicity of elemental properties, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, solutions, properties of gases, and an introduction to thermodynamics and descriptive chemistry. Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in lecture will be included.  Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra (3 SCH version) or equivalent academic preparation or permission by department chair. High school chemistry is strongly recommended. Course fee $75. F, Sp, Su (40.0501.54 03).

 

CHEM 1412. (T)        

General Chemistry II. (lecture + lab)      (4-3-3)

Chemical equilibrium; phase diagrams and spectrometry; acid-base concepts; thermodynamics; kinetics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in lecture will be included.  Prerequisite: CHEM 1411 General Chemistry I. Course fee $75. Sp, Su II (40.0501.57 03).

 

CHEM 2423. (T)        

Organic Chemistry I. (lecture + lab)    (4-3-4)

Fundamental principles of organic chemistry will be studied, including the structure, bonding, properties, and reactivity of organic molecules; and properties and behavior of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis is placed on organic synthesis and mechanisms. Includes study of covalent and ionic bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, and synthesis of simple molecules. THIS COURSE IS INTENDED FOR STUDENTS IN SCIENCE OR PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS. Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in lecture will be included.  Prerequisite: CHEM 1412 General Chemistry II. Course fee $75. Su (40.0504 52 03).

 

CHEM 2425. (T)        

Organic Chemistry II.  (lecture + lab)     (4-3-4)

Advanced principles of organic chemistry will be studied, including the structure, properties, and reactivity of aliphatic and aromatic organic molecules; and properties and behavior of organic compounds and their derivatives. Emphasis is placed on organic synthesis and mechanisms. Includes study of covalent and ionic bonding, nomenclature, stereochemistry, structure and reactivity, reaction mechanisms, functional groups, and synthesis of simple molecules. THIS COURSE IS INTENDED FOR STUDENTS IN SCIENCE OR PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS. Basic laboratory experiments supporting theoretical principles presented in lecture will be included.  Prerequisite: CHEM 2423 Organic Chemistry I. Course fee $75.  Sp (40.0504.52 03).


COLLEGE SUCCESS STRATEGIES (COLS)

ORIE 0100. (NT)   *****

Achieving College Excellence.    

(1-1-0)

Institutional Credit Only. An introduction to those issues that help students be successful in higher education. Topics included are college policies and procedures, time management, study skills, goal setting, information

technology, selecting a major, transferring, finances, health and wellness, and decision-making. Strongly advised for all entering freshmen. Course meet 3 hours per day for 5 days or 3 hours per week for 5 weeks or any other combination that results in 15 hours in class activities. F, Sp (3201015212).

 

COLS 0300.  (NT)

College Success Strategies     

(3-3-0)

Psychology of learning and success. Examines factors that underlie learning, success, and personal development in higher education. Topics covered include information processing, memory, strategic learning, self-regulation, goal setting, motivation, educational and career planning, and learning styles. Techniques of study such as time management, listening and note taking, text marking, library and research skills, preparing for examinations, and utilizing learning resources are covered. Includes courses in college orientation and developments of students’ academic skills that apply to all disciplines.  F, Sp, Su  (3201015212).


COMMERCIAL ART (see Advertising/Graphic Design Technology)


 COMMUNICATIONS (COMM)

COMM 1307. (T)

Introduction to Mass Communications.    (3-3-0)

Survey of basic content and structural elements of mass media and their functions and influences on society. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (0901025106).

 

COMM 1316. (T)      

News Photography I.   (3-2-4)

Problems and practices of photography for publications. Includes instructional camera and equipment operation and maintenance, film and plate developing and printing media. Course fee $75. F, Sp (0904015506).

 

COMM 2305. (T)      

Editing and Layout.    (3-3-1)

Editing and layout processes, with emphasis on accuracy and fairness, including the principles and techniques of design. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (0904015106).

 

COMM 2311. (T)      

Media Writing.       (3-3-1)

Fundamentals of writing news for the mass media. Includes instruction in methods and techniques for gathering, processing and delivering news in professional manner. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (0904015706).

 

COMM 2315. (T)      

News Reporting.       (3-3-1)                                         

This course focuses on advanced news-gathering and writing skills. It concentrates on the three-part process of producing news stories: discovering the news, reporting the news, and writing the news in different formats.  Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in COMM 2311. F, Sp (0904015806).

 

COMM 2327. (T)      

Intro to Advertising.     (3-3-0)

Fundamentals of advertising including marketing theory and strategy, copy writing, design and selection of media. F, Sp (0909035106).

 

COMM 2389. (T)     

Academic Cooperative (Yearbook/Magazine Project).   (3-3-1)

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on work experience in conjunction with class seminars, the individual student will set specific goals and objectives in the study of communication. Course fee $75. F, Sp (2401035212).


COMPUTER AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (BCIS, COSC, CPMT, EECT, ITCC, ITMT, ITNW, ITSC, ITSE, ITSW, ITSY)

BCIS 1305. (T)                  

Business Computer Applications.  (3-3-0)                                                            

Students will study computer terminology, hardware, and software related to the business environment.  The focus of this course is on business productivity software applications and professional behavior in computing, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics, and business-oriented utilization of the internet.  Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201and ENGL 1301 and MATH 0307.  Course fee $50. F, Sp, Su (1102025404).

 

COSC 1336. (T)                 

Programming Fundamentals I.   (3-3-1)

Introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming and provides a comprehensive introduction to programming for computer science and technology majors.  Topics include software development methodology, data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging.  This course assumes computer literacy. This course is included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Computer Science. Prerequisite Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301 and MATH Co-requisite courses. Course fee $50. F, Sp, Su (1102015507).

 

COSC 1337. (T)                 

Programming Fundamentals II.    (3-3-1)

This course focuses on the object-oriented programming paradigm, emphasizing the definition and use of classes along with fundamentals of object-oriented design.  The course includes basic analysis of algorithms, searching and sorting techniques, and an introduction to software engineering processes.  Students will apply techniques for testing and debugging software. This course is included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Computer Science.  Prerequisite: COSC 1336. Course fee $50.  Sp, Su (1102015607).

 

COSC 2336. (T)
Programming Fundamentals III.  
(3-3-1)

Further applications of programming techniques, introducing the fundamental concepts of data structures and algorithms.  Topics include data structures (including stacks, queues, linked lists, hash tables, trees, and graphs), searching, sorting, recursion, and algorithmic analysis. Programs will be implemented in an appropriate object oriented language. This course is included in the Field of Study Curriculum for Computer Science.  Prerequisite:  COSC 1337. Course fee $50. F (1102015707).

 

CPMT 1305. (NT)             

IT Essentials I:  PC Hardware and Software.    (3-2-3)

Provides comprehensive overview of computer hardware and software and an introduction to advanced concepts.  Students prepare for the CompTIA A+ certification exam.   Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301, and MATH 0307 or equivalent.  Course fee $50. F, Sp (4701040011).

 

CPMT 2250. (NT)
Industry Certification Preparation. 
  (2-1-3)

Overview of the objectives for industry specific certification exam(s). Prerequisites: sophomore standing as a CIT major and consent of instructor. Course fee $50. F, Sp, Su (4701040000).

 

EECT 1300. (NT)
Technical Customer Service.
    (3-2-4)

General principles of customer service within a technical environment. Topics include internal/external customer relationships, time-management, best practices, and verbal and non-verbal communications skills. Prerequisite: CPMT 1305 and ITMT 1358. Course fee $50. F, Sp (1503030000).

 

GAME 1303. (NT)
Introduction to Game Design and Development. 
  (3-2-3)

Introduction to electronic game development and game development careers. Includes examination of history and philosophy of games, the game production process, employee factors for success in the field, and current issues and practices in the game development industry. Prerequisite: COSC 1337. Course fee $50. F (1003040000).

 

ITCC 1314. (NT)               

CCNA 1: Introduction to Networks.   (3-2-3)     

This course covers networking architecture, structure, and functions; introduces the principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations to provide a foundation for the curriculum. Students prepare for the CCENT and CCNA certification exams. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301, and MATH 0307. Course fee $50. F, Sp (1110020000).

 

ITCC 1340. (NT)               

CCNA 2: Routing and Switching Essentials.      (3-2-3)

Describes the architecture, components, and basic operation of routers and explains the basic principles of routing and routing protocols. It also provides an in-depth understanding of how switches operate and are implemented in the LAN environment for small and large networks. Students prepare for the CCENT and CCNA certification exams. Prerequisites: ITCC 1314. Course fee $50. Sp (1110020000).

 

ITCC 2312. (NT)               

CCNA 3: Scaling Networks.    (3-2-3)

CCNA R&S: Scaling Networks (ScaN) covers the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks.  Students learn how to configure routers and switches using advanced protocols. Students prepare for the CCNA certification exam. Prerequisites: ITCC 1340. Course fee $50. F (1110020000).

 

ITCC 2313. (NT)               

CCNA 4: Connecting Networks.   (3-2-3)

WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network; enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students prepare for the CCNA certification exam. Prerequisites: ITCC 2312. Course fee $50. F (1110020000).

 

 ITCC 2343. (NT)     

 Network Security.   (3-2-3)

Overall security processes with particular emphasis on hands-on skills in the following areas: security policy design and management; security technologies; products and solutions; firewall and secure router design, installation, configuration, and maintenance; AAQA and VPN implementation using routers and firewalls. Prerequisite: ITCC 1340 and ITSY 1342. Course fee $50. F (1110020000).

 

ITMT 1358. (NT)
Windows Client Operating System.
    (3-2-3)

A study of Windows operating system; installation, configuration, and troubleshooting; file management; users accounts and permissions; security features; network connectivity; setup of external devices; optimization and customization; and deployment of applications, with hands-on experience. Students prepare for the MCSA Windows certification exams. Prerequisite:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301, and MATH 0307 Course fee $50. F, Sp (1109010000).

 

ITNW 1313. (NT)
Computer Virtualization.
  (3-2-2)

Implement and support virtualization of clients of servers in a networked computing environment. This course explores installation, configuration, and management of computer virtualization workstation and servers. Prerequisite: ITCC 1314 or ITNW 1325 and ITMT 1358 or ITNW 1308. Course fee $50. Sp (1109010000).

 

ITNW 1354. (NT)
Implementing and Supporting Servers.
     (3-2-3)

Implement, administer, and troubleshoot information systems that incorporate servers in a networked computing environment. Prerequisite: ITCC 1314 or ITNW 1325 and ITMT 1358 or ITNW 1308. Course fee $50. F (1109010000).

 

ITSC 1164. (NT)                

Practicum - Computer & Information Sciences, General      (1-0-10)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. Student must work on average 10 hours a week in the industry. Prerequisite: sophomore standing as a CIT major and consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su (1101010000).

 

ITSC 1315. (NT)
Project Management Software.
   (3-2-2)

Use of project management software for developing a project plan including timelines, milestones, scheduling, life cycle phases, management frameworks, skills, processes, and tools. Prerequisite: Must be eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 ENGL 1301 and MATH 0307. Course fee $50. F, Sp, Su (1101010000).

 

ITSC 1316. (NT)
Linux Installation and Configuration. 
   (3-2-2)

Introduction to Linux operating system. Includes Linux installation, basic administration, utilities and commands, upgrading, networking, security, and application installation. Emphasizes hands-on setup, administration, and management of Linux. Prerequisite:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301, and MATH 0307. Course fee $50. Sp (1101010000).

 

ITSC 1319. (NT)
Internet/Web Page Development. 
  (3-2-2)

Instruction in the use of Internet concepts and the introduction to web page design and development. Prerequisite:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301, and MATH 0307. Course fee $50. F (1110040000)

 

ITSC 1364. (NT)                

Practicum - Computer & Information Sciences, General         (3-0-21)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. Student must work on average 20 hours a week in the industry and participate in a one hour class each week. Prerequisite: sophomore standing as a CIT major and consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su (1101010007).

 

ITSC 2335. (NT)                

Application Software Problem Solving.   (3-2-4)

Utilization of appropriate application software to solve advanced problems and generate customized solutions. Prerequisite: ITSW 1304 or ITSW 1307 or ITSW 2334 or ITSW 2337.  Course fee $50. F, Sp (1101010000).

 

ITSE 1333. (NT)              

Mobile Applications Development.    (3-2-3)

An overview of different mobile platforms and their development environments. Students learn to design, write, and test small interactive programs for mobile platforms. Prerequisite: ITSC 1319 or ITNW 1337 and COSC 1336. Course fee $50. Sp (1108010000).

 

ITSE 1359. (NT)              

Introduction to Scripting Languages.   (3-2-2)

Introduction to scripting languages including basic data types, control structures, regular expressions, input/output, and textual analysis.  Prerequisite: ITMT 1358 or ITNW 1308. Course fee $50. F, Sp (1102010000).

 

ITSE 2309. (NT)              

Database Programming.   (3-2-3)

Database development using database programming techniques emphasizing database structures, modeling, and database access. Prerequisite: ITSW 1307 or ITSW 2337. Course fee $50. Sp (1108020000).

 

ITSW 1304. (NT)              

Introduction to Spreadsheets.    (3-2-2)

Instruction in the concepts, procedures, and application of electronic spreadsheets. Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301, and MATH 0307. Course fee $50. F (1103010007).

 

ITSW 1307. (NT)              

Introduction to Database.    (3-2-2)

Introduction to database theory and the practical applications of a database. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301 and MATH Co-requisite courses. Course fee $50. F (1108020007).

 

ITSW 2334. (NT)             

Advanced Spreadsheets.    (3-2-3)

Advanced techniques for developing and modifying spreadsheets. Includes macros and data analysis functions. Students prepare for the MOS Excel certification. Students may not receive credit for both ITSW 1304 and ITSW 2334.  Prerequisite: BCIS 1305 or ITSC 1301. Course fee $50. F, Sp (1103010000).

 

ITSW 2337. (NT)             

Advanced Database.    (3-2-3)

Advanced concepts of database design and functionality. Students prepare for the MOS Access certification.  Students may not receive credit for both ITSW 1307 and ITSW 2337. Prerequisite: BCIS 1305 or ITSC 1301. Course fee $50. F (1108020000).

 

ITSY 1342. (NT)              

Information Technology Security.    (3-2-2)

Instruction in security for network hardware, software, and data, including physical security; backup procedures; relevant tools; encryption; and protection from viruses. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in READ 0306/ENGL 0307 and MATH 0306/0307. Course fee $50. Sp (1110030000).

 

ITSY 2343. (NT)                

Computer Systems Forensics.     (3-2-3)                                                                 

In-depth study of system forensics including methodologies used for analysis of computer security breaches. Gather and evaluate evidence to perform postmortem analysis of a security breach. Prerequisite: ITCC 1314 or ITNW 1325 and ITSY 1342. Course fee $50. Sp (1110030000).


CORROSION TECHNOLOGY (ELPT, METL, NDTE)

ELPT 1311. (NT)           

Basic Electrical Theory.    (3-2-4)

Basic theory and practice of electrical circuits. Includes calculations as applied to alternating and direct current. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (460401).

 

METL 1301. (NT)           

Introduction to Metallurgy.   (3-3-0)

A study of refining, mechanical, and physical properties of ferrous and nonferrous materials including the theory of alloys, heat treatment, and testing. Prerequisite: TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT.. F, Sp (1506110011).

 

METL 1313. (NT)           

Introduction to Corrosion.     (3-3-0)

An introduction to internal, external, and atmospheric corrosion including terminology, causes of common corrosion problems in industry, and general remedies such as cathodic protection, protective coatings, material selection, and chemical treatments. Prerequisite: TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT. F, Sp (1506110011).

 

METL 1366. (NT)            

Practicum (or field Experience) Metallurgical Technology/ Technician.    (3-0-21)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. Prerequisites: METL 2341. F, Sp (1506110011).

 

METL 1391. (NT)           

Special Topics in Metallurgical Technology/Technician.     (3-2-4)

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Instructor approval is required. TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1506110011).

 

METL 2301. (NT)           

Internal Corrosion Control.     (3-2-4)

An in-depth study of internal corrosion found in oil and gas wells, pipelines, refineries, process plants, and other industrial installations, including the common forms of nondestructive testing, internal corrosion monitoring techniques, and chemical corrosion control treatment methods. Prerequisites: TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1506110011).

 

METL 2305. (NT)           

Atmospheric Corrosion Control.      (3-2-4)

An in-depth study of atmospheric corrosion control by coatings which includes surface preparation, coating selection, coating application, inspection, and failure analysis. Prerequisite: TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1506110011).

 

METL 2341. (NT)           

Cathodic Protection.      (3-2-4)

An in-depth study of corrosion control of buried or submerged metallic structures utilizing both impressed and galvanic cathodic protection systems. Emphasis on regulatory compliance for pipelines and underground storage tanks. Prerequisites: METL 1313 and a C or better in ELPT 1311. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1506110011).

 

METL 2471. (NT)             

Corrosion Integrity Management.      (4-3-3)

An in-depth study of integrity management practices including remediation technology and field techniques for carrying out integrity assessments. Emphasis is placed on industry codes, standards and regulations. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: METL 2301, METL 2305, and METL 2341. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1506110011).

 

METL 2372. (NT)             

Corrosion Operator Qualifications.      (3-2-4)                                    

An in-depth study of pipeline operator qualification requirements and the covered tasks related to corrosion.  Emphasis is placed on federal regulations and pipeline industry requirements. Prerequisites:  METL 1313 and a C or better in ELPT 1311.  Course fee $100.  Certification Fee $220. F, Sp, Su. (1506110011).

 

NDTE 1305. (NT)              

Introduction to Ultrasonics.     (3-2-4)

Basic theory and applications of the ultrasonic techniques of materials testing covering the

theoretical material from the certification test for Ultrasonic Level I American Society of Non-Destructive Testing. Prerequisite: TSI complete in MATH, READ and WRIT. Course fee $100. F, Sp (4805080000).


 COSMETOLOGY (CSME)

CSME 1401. (NT)

Orientation to Cosmetology.    (4-2-8)

 An overview of the skills and knowledge necessary for the field of cosmetology. Course fee $35. Student Permit Fee $25. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in /ENGL 0307. (12.0401).

 

CSME 1391. (NT)

Special Topics in Cosmetology.        (3-1-6)

 Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors   pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0401).

 

CSME 1310. (NT)

Introduction to Haircutting and Related Theory.     (3-1-8)

An Introduction to the theory and practice of hair cutting. Topics include terminology, implements, sectioning and finishing techniques. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0407).

 

CSME 1443. (NT)

Manicuring and Related Theory.        (4-2-8)

Presentation of the theory and practice of nail services. Topics include terminology, application, and workplace competencies related to nail services. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0410).

 

CSME 1447. (NT)

Principles of Skin Care/Facial Related Theory.     (4-2-7)

In-depth coverage of the theory and practice of skin care, facials, and cosmetics. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0409).

 

CSME 2310. (NT)

Advanced Haircutting and Related Theory.      (3-1-8)

Advanced concepts and practice of haircutting. Topics include haircuts utilizing scissors, razor, and/or clippers. Course fee $35. . Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0407).

 

CSME 2401. (NT)

The Principles of Hair Coloring and Related Theory.      (4-2-7)

Presentation of the theory, practice, and chemistry of hair color. Topics include terminology, application, and workplace competencies related to hair color. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0407).

 

CSME 1354. (NT)

Artistry of Hair Design I.     (3-1-8)

Introduction to hair design. Topics include the theory and applications of wet styling, thermal hair styling, and finishing techniques. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0407).

 

CSME 1453. (NT)

Chemical Reformation and Related Theory.     (4-2-7)

Presentation of the theory and practice of chemical reformation including terminology, application, and workplace competencies. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0407).

 

CSME 1355. (NT)

Artistry of Hair Design II.     (3-1-8)

A continuation of hair design. Topics include the additional theory and applications of current trends in hair design. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0407).

 

CSME 2337. (NT)

Advanced Cosmetology Techniques.      (3-1-8)

Mastery of advanced cosmetology techniques including hair designs, professional cosmetology services, and workplace competencies. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0401).

 

CSME 2441. (NT)

Preparation for State Licensing Examination.      (4-2-7)

Preparation for the state licensing examination. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0401).

 

CSME 1430. (NT)

Orientation to Nail Technology.    (4-2-8)

An overview of the fundamental skills and knowledge necessary for the field of nail technology. Course fee $35. Student Permit Fee $25. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0410).

 

CSME 1431. (NT)

Principles of Nail Technology I.     (4-2-8)

A course in the principles of nail technology. Topics include anatomy, physiology, theory, and skills related to nail technology. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0410).

 

CSME 1441. (NT)

Principles of Nail Technology II.     (4-2-8)

A continuation of the concepts and principles of nail technology. Topics include professional ethics, salon management, client relations, and related skills of nail technology. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0410).

 

CSME 2430. (NT)

Nail Enhancement.      (4-2-8)

A course in the theory, application, and related technology of artificial nails. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0410).

 

CSME 1420. (NT)

Orientation to Facial Specialist.        (4-2-7)

An overview of the skills and knowledge necessary for the field of facials and skin care. Course fee $35. Student Permit Fee $25. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307.  (12.0408).

 

CSME 1248. (NT)

Principles of Skin Care.      (2-1-4)

An introduction of the theory and practice of skin care. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307.  (12.0409).

 

CSME 1421. (NT)

Principles of Facial and Skin Care Technology I.       (4-2-8)

An introduction to the principles of facial and skin care technology. Topics include anatomy, physiology, theory, and related skills of facial and skin care technology. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0409).

 

CSME 1302. (NT)

Applications of Facial and Skin Care Technology I.      (3-2-4)

Introduction to the application of facial and skin care technology. Includes identifying and utilizing professional skin care products. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0409).

 

CSME 1445. (NT)

Principles of Facial and Skin Care Technology II.       (4-2-8)

A continuation of the concepts and principles in skin care and other related technologies. Topics include advanced instruction in anatomy, physiology, theory, and related skills of facial and Skin care technology. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll ENGL 0307. (12.0409).

 

CSME 2431. (NT)

Principles of Facial and Skin Care Technology III.     (4-2-8)

Advanced concepts and principles of skin care and other related technologies. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0409).

 

CSME 2233. (NT)

Applications of Facial and Skin Care Technology II.    (2-1-4)

Continuation of the Application of Facial and Skin Care Technology I. Preparation for the state licensing Facial Specialty Exam. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0409).

 

CSME 1293. (NT)

Special Topics in Cosmetic Services.      (2-1-4)

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Course fee $35. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (12.0401).


CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CRIJ, CJLE, CJSA)

CRIJ 1301. (T)

Introduction to Criminal Justice.    (3-3-0)        

This course provides a historical and philosophical overview of the American criminal justice system, including the nature, extent, and impact of crime; criminal law; and justice agencies and processes. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0307. F, Sp (4301045124).

 

CRIJ 1306. (T)

Court Systems & Practices.       (3-3-0)

This course is a study of the court system as it applies to the structures, procedures, practices and sources of law in American courts, using federal and Texas statutes and case law. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (2201015424).

 

CRIJ 1307. (T)

Crime in America.         (3-3-0)

American crime problems in historical perspective, social and public policy factors affecting crime, impact and crime trends, social characteristics of specific crimes, and prevention of crime. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4504015225).

 

CRIJ 1310. (T)

Fundamentals of Criminal Law.        (3-3-0)

This course is the study of criminal law including application of definitions, statutory elements, defenses and penalties using Texas statutes, the Model Penal Code, and case law. The course also analyzes the philosophical and historical development of criminal law and criminal culpability. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F (2201015324).

 

CRIJ 1313. (T)

Juvenile Justice System.      (3-3-0)

A study of the juvenile justice process to include specialized juvenile law, role of the juvenile courts, role of police agencies, role of correctional agencies, and theories concerning delinquency. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F (4301045224).

 

CRIJ 2313. (T)

Correctional Systems and Practices.         (3-3-0)

This course is a survey of institutional and non-institutional corrections. Emphasis will be placed on the organization and operation of correctional systems; treatment and rehabilitation; populations served; Constitutional issues; and current and future issues. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4301045424).

 

CRIJ 2314. (T)

Criminal Investigation.       (3-3-0)

Investigative theory; collection and preservation of evidence; sources of information; interview and interrogation; uses of forensic sciences; and case and trial preparation. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F (4301045524).

 

CRIJ 2323. (T)

Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement.      (3-3-0)

Police authority; responsibilities; constitutional constraints; laws of arrest, search, and seizure; police liability. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301 Sp (4301045624).

 

CRIJ 2328. (T)

Police Systems and Practices.    (3-3-0)

This course examines the establishment, role and function of police in a democratic society. It will focus on types of police agencies and their organizational structure, police-community interaction, police ethics, and use of authority Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301Sp (4301045724).

 

CJLE 1249. (NT)

Intermediate Arrest, Search, and Seizure.       (3-3-0)

Probable cause; detention and arrest; exceptions to search warrant requirements; principles of preparing valid search warrants; pretrial suppression hearings; and civil liability for improper arrests, searches, and seizures. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  F (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1327. (NT)

Interviewing and Report Writing for Criminal Justice Professions.        (3-3-0)

Instruction and skill development in interviewing, note-taking, and report writing in the criminal justice context. Development of skills to conduct investigations by interviewing witnesses, victims, and suspects properly. Organization of information regarding incidents into effective written reports. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1333. (NT)

Traffic Law and Investigation.            (3-3-0)

Instruction in the basic principles of traffic control, traffic law enforcement, court procedures, and traffic law. Emphasis on the need for a professional approach in dealing with traffic law violators and the police role in accident investigation and traffic supervision. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1345. (NT)

Intermediate Crime Scene Investigation.        (3-3-1)

Topics include objectives, preparations, procedures, and methods of crime scene search; value of crime scene sketches and their relationship to crime scene photographs; fingerprints as physical evidence, fingerprint identification and classification, types of impressions and techniques for locating and developing impressions. Course fee: $45. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1425. (NT)

Criminal Justice Survey.       (4-4-0)

An overview of criminal justice agencies with an emphasis on preparation for law enforcement licensure. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1506. (NT)

Basic Peace Officer I.      (5-3-6)

Basic preparation for a new peace officer. Should be taken in conjunction with Basic Peace Officer II, III, IV, and V (supplement) to satisfy the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement approved Basic Peace Officer Training Academy. Course fee: $100. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1512. (NT)

Basic Peace Officer II.     (5-3-6)

Basic preparation for a new peace officer. Should be taken in conjunction with Basic Peace Officer I, III, IV, and V (supplement) to satisfy the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement approved Basic Peace Officer Training Academy. Course fee: $100. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1518. (NT)

Basic Peace Officer III.        (5-3-6)

Basic preparation for a new peace officer. Should be taken in conjunction with Basic Peace Officer I, II, IV, and V (supplement) to satisfy the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement approved Basic Peace Officer Training Academy. Course fee: $100. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1524. (NT)

Basic Peace Officer IV.     (5-3-6)

Basic preparation for a new peace officer. Should be taken in conjunction with Basic Peace Officer I, II, III, and V (supplement) to satisfy the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement approved Basic Peace Officer Training Academy. Course fee: $100. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (4301070000).

 

CJLE 1429. (NT)

Basic Peace Officer V.    (4-2-7)

Supplemental course taken in conjunction with Basic Peace Officer Courses I, II, III, and IV. Satisfies or exceeds the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement approved Basic Peace Officer Academy Course #1000. Course fee: $100. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (4301070000).

 

CJSA 1322. (NT)

Introduction to Criminal Justice.       (3-3-0)                                                                    

History and philosophy of criminal justice and ethical considerations; crime defined; its nature and impact; overview of criminal justice system; law enforcement; court system; prosecution and defense; trial process; corrections. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (4301040000).

 

CJSA 1327. (NT)

Fundamentals of Criminal Law.          (3-3-0)

A study of the nature of criminal law; philosophical and historical development; major definitions and concepts; classification of crime; elements of crimes and penalties using Texas statutes as illustrations; criminal responsibility. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301..F (4301040000).


CULINARY ARTS (CHEF, HAMG, RSTO, PSTR)

CHEF 1205. (NT)

Sanitation and Safety.     (2-2-0)

A study of personal cleanliness; sanitary practices in food preparation; causes, investigation, control of illness caused by food contamination (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points); and work place safety standards. To complete this course successfully, the student must pass the ServSafe Manager’s Certification Test. To advance to the Culinary Management Certificate, the student must have a C or better in this course.  Prerequisites:  Must be eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307.    Course fee: $45. CIP:  12.0503.

 

CHEF 1191. (NT)

Special Topics in Culinary Arts/Chef Training      (2-2-0)                  

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge’s, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Course fee: $45. CIP:  12.0503.

 

CHEF 1301. (NT)

Basic Food Preparation.       (3-2-4)

A study of the fundamental principles of food preparation and cookery to include Brigade System, cooking techniques, material handling, heat transfer, sanitation, safety, nutrition, and professionalism. Prerequisites: Must be eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307 and MATH 0306/0307. Corequisite or Prerequisite: CHEF 1205. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0503.

 

CHEF 1302. (NT)

Principles of Healthy Cuisine.    (3-2-2)

Introduction to the principles of planning, preparation, and presentation of nutritionally balanced meals. Alternative methods and ingredients will be used to achieve a healthier cooking style. Prerequisite: CHEF 2201. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0503.

                                            

CHEF 1310. (NT)

Garde Manger.        (3-2-2)

A study of cold foods and garnishes. Emphasis on design, techniques, and display of fine foods. Prerequisite: CHEF 2201. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0503.

                                            

CHEF 1340. (NT)

Meat Preparation and Cooking.     (3-2-2)

Study of the preparation, storage, and cooking techniques for beef, pork, lamb, poultry, seafood, and game. Includes moist, dry, and combination heat preparation methods as related to both classical and modern methods of preparation of dishes. Prerequisite: CHEF 2201. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0503.

                                            

CHEF 1341. (NT)

American Regional Cuisine.     (3-2-4)

A study of the development of regional cuisine's in the United States with emphasis on the similarities in production and service systems. Application of skills to develop, organize, and acquire knowledge of recipe strategies and production systems. Prerequisite: Culinary Arts Certificate. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0503.

                                            

CHEF 1345. (NT)

International Cuisine.     (3-2-4)

The study of classical cooking skills associated with the preparation and service of international and ethnic cuisines. Topics include similarities between food production systems used in the United States and other regions of the world. Prerequisite: Culinary Arts Certificate. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0503.                                                                                                                                                               

CHEF 2201. (NT)

Intermediate Food Preparation.         (2-1-2)

Continuation of previous food preparation course. Topics include the concept of pre-cooked food items, as well as scratch preparation. Covers full range of food preparation techniques. Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307and MATH 0307. and MATH 0306/0307. Prerequisite: CHEF 1301. Corequisite or prerequisite: CHEF 1205. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0503.                                                                                                                                             

HAMG 1221. (NT)

Introduction to the Hospitality Industry.       (2-2-0)

An exploration of the elements and career opportunities within the multiple segments of the hospitality industry.  Prerequisites:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Prerequisite:  Culinary Arts Certificate.  Course fee: $45. CIP: 52.0901.                                                                                                                                                                                

 

HAMG 2205. (NT)

Hospitality Management and Leadership.    (2-2-0)                                                      

An overview of management and leadership in the hospitality industry with an emphasis on  management philosophy, policy formulation, communications, motivation and team building. Prerequisites:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307.  Prerequisite:  Culinary Arts Certificate. Course fee: $45. CIP: 52.0901.

 

HAMG 2332. (NT)

Hospitality Financial Management.        (2-2-0)

Methods and application of financial management within the hospitality industry. Primary emphasis on sales accountability, internal controls, and report analysis.  Prerequisite:  Culinary Arts Certificate. Course fee: $45. CIP:  52.0901.                                                                                                         

 

PSTR 1301. (NT)

Fundamentals of Baking.      (3-2-2)

Fundamentals of baking including dough, quick breads, pies, cakes, cookies, and tarts. Instruction in flours, fillings, and ingredients. Topics include baking terminology, tool and equipment use, formula conversions, functions of ingredients, and the evaluation of baked products. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Corequisite or Prerequisite: CHEF 1205. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0501.

 

PSTR 2331. (NT)

Advanced Pastry Shop.     (3-2-2)

A study of classical desserts, French and international pastries, hot and cold desserts, ice creams and ices, chocolate work, and decorations. Emphasis on advanced techniques. Prerequisite: PSTR 1301. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0501.                   

 

RSTO 1204. (NT)

Dining Room Services.      (2-2-0)

Introduces the principles, concepts, and systems of professional table service. Topics include dining room organization, scheduling, and management of food service personnel. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Course fee: $45. CIP: 12.0504.

                                                          

RSTO 1306. (NT)

Facilities Layout and Design.       (3-2-2)

Overview of the planning, development, and feasibility aspects of building or renovating a food service facility. Application of principles of work and flow analysis, spatial relationships, and equipment selection as they relate to the overall layout and design. Prerequisites:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Prerequisite:  Culinary Arts Certificate. Course fee:  $45. CIP: 12.0504.

 

RSTO 2431. (NT)

Food Service Management      (4-2-7)                                         

Mastery of actual management experiences in supervision, training, planning, and control of a variety of food service operation formats may include cafeteria, table service, meetings, banquets, and catered events.  Prerequisite:  First two semesters of the Culinary Management Certificate.  Course fee:  $45.  CIP:  12.0504.


DANCE (DANC)

DANC 1112. (T)         

Dance Practicum.     (1-0-4)

A course for all dance students enrolled in a Ballet, Modern Dance or Tap and Jazz class that gives them the opportunity to perform their own and other choreographers' work in a Concert. Required for students taking any spring dance course (except DANC 1341). Course fee $35. Sp (5003015226).

 

DANC1141. (T)

Ballet I.    (1-3-0) 

Fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on technique and theory with work on alignment and terminology. Participation for those with previous ballet experience or instructor’s approval. Course may be repeated one time. Course fee $35. F, Sp (5003015226).

 

DANC 1142. (T)

Ballet II.     (1-3-0)

Continuation of DANC 1141. Prerequisite: Two semesters of DANC 1141 or the instructor's approval. Course may be repeated one time. Course fee $35. F, Sp (5003015226).

 

DANC 1145. (T)

Modern Dance I.   (1-3-0)

Introduction to the basic theory and techniques of modern dance with emphasis on using time, space, and dynamics. Course fee $35. F (5003015226).

 

DANC 1146. (T)

Modern Dance II.     (1-3-0)

Continuation of DANC 1345 with more complex floorwork. Prerequisite: DANC 1345 or the instructor’s approval. Course fee $35. F (5003015226).

 

DANC 1301. (T)

Improvisation and Composition.         (3-3-0)

Theory and practice of movement exploration as a basis for choreography. Sophomore level course or instructor's approval. Sp (5003015526).

 

DANC 1341. (T)          

Introduction to Ballet.    (3-3-0)

Introductory level of classical ballet with emphasis on positions, basic movements, and terminology. For non-majors or those who are not ready for Ballet I.  Course fee $35. F, Sp (5003015226).

 

DANC 1345. (T)          

Modern Dance I.     (3-4-0)

Continuation of DANC 1145 with more complex movement material with emphasis on injury prevention and correct alignment. Prerequisite: DANC 1145 or the instructor's approval. Course fee $35. Sp (5003015226).

 

DANC 2303. (T)           

Dance Appreciation.        (3-3-0)

A survey of dance as an art form and its relationship to culture. In this course students will also experience the basic elements and principles of dance, as well as gain an understanding of other world dance forms. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (5003015426).


DRAFTING DESIGN (ARCE, DFTG)

ARCE 1352. (NT)        

Structural Drafting.      (3-2-4)

A study of structural systems including concrete foundations and frames, wood framing and trusses, and structural steel framing systems. Includes detailing of concrete, wood, and steel to meet industry standards including the American Institute of Steel Construction and The American Concrete Institute. Prerequisites: DFTG 1309 and DFTG 1325 Course fee $100. F, Sp. (0409010011).

 

DFTG 1309. (NT)        

Basic Computer-Aided Drafting.        (3-2-4)

An introduction to computer-aided drafting. Emphasis is placed on setup; creating and modifying geometry; storing and retrieving predefined shapes; placing, rotating, and scaling objects, adding text and dimensions, using layers, coordinate systems; and plot/print to scale. Prerequisites: ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307 or equivalent. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1513020011).

 

DFTG 1317. (NT)         

Architectural Drafting – Residential.    (3-2-4)

Architectural drafting procedures, practices, terms and symbols. Preparation of detailed working drawings for residential structures. Emphasis on light frame construction methods. Prerequisites: DFTG 1309 and DFTG 1325. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1513030011).

 

DFTG 1325. (NT)         

Blueprint Reading and Sketching.      (3-2-4)

An introduction to reading and interpreting working drawings for fabrication processes and associated trades. Use of sketching techniques to create pictorial and multiple-view drawings. Prerequisites: ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307 or equivalent. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1513010011).

 

DFTG 1345. (NT)  

Parametric Modeling and Design.      (3-2-4)

Parametric-based design software for 3D design and drafting. Prerequisites: ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307 or equivalent; Prerequisite of passing score on computer competency test or concurrent enrollment in BCIS 1305 or ITSC 1309. Course fee $175. F, Sp (1513060011).

 

DFTG 1358. (NT)  

Electrical/Electronics Drafting.       (3-2-4)

Electrical and electronic drawings stressing modern representation used for block diagrams, schematic diagrams, logic diagrams, wiring/assembly drawings, printed circuit board layouts, motor control diagrams, power distribution diagrams, and electrical one-line diagrams. Prerequisites: DFTG 1309 and DFTG 1325. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1513050011).

 

DFTG 2302. (NT)   

Machine Drafting.   (3-2-4)

Production of detail and assembly drawings of machines, threads, gears, utilizing tolerances, limit dimensioning, and surface finishes. Prerequisites: DFTG 1309 and DFTG 2340. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1513060011).

 

DFTG 2319. (NT)  

Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting.      (3-2-4)

A continuation of practices and techniques used in basic computer-aided drafting including the development and use of prototype drawings, construction of pictorial drawings, extracting data, and basics of 3D. Prerequisites: DFTG 1309 and DFTG 1325. Course fee $100. F, Sp. (1513020011).

 

DFTG 2321. (NT)  

Topographical Drafting.     (3-2-4)

Plotting of surveyor's field notes. Includes drawing elevations, contour lines, plan and profiles, and laying out traverses. Prerequisites: DFTG 1309 and DFTG 1325. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1513040011).

 

DFTG 2323. (NT)  

Pipe Drafting.       (3-2-4)

A study of pipe fittings, symbols, specifications and their applications to a piping process system. Creation of symbols and their usage in flow diagrams, plans, elevations, and isometrics. Prerequisites: DFTG 1309 and DFTG 1325. Course fee $100. F, Sp (1513020011).

 

DFTG 2335. (NT)  

Advanced Technologies in Mechanical Design and Drafting.       (3-2-4)

Use parametric-based software for mechanical design for advanced modeling and analysis. Prerequisite: DFTG 2340. Course fee $175. F, Sp (1513060011).

 

DFTG 2340. (NT)  

Solid Modeling/Design.        (3-2-4)

A computer-aided modeling course. Development of three-dimensional drawings and models from engineering sketches and orthographic drawings and utilization of three dimensional models in design work. Prerequisite: DFTG 1345. Course fee $175. F, Sp. (1513020011).

 

DFTG 2386. (NT)   

Internship - Drafting and Design Technology/Technician, General.      (3-1-9)

A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer. Prerequisite: Advanced standing and permission of the instructor. F, Sp (1513010011).

 

GISC 1311. (NT)

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)    (3-2-4)

Introduction to basic concepts of vector GIS using several industry specific software programs including nomenclature of cartography and geography. Prerequisite: DFTG 1325. Course fee $100. Sp. (45.07020011).


DIESEL TECHNOLOGY (DEMR, HEMR)

DEMR 1280. (NT)           

Cooperative Education-Diesel Mechanics Technology/ Technician.    (2-1-10)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307.

 

DEMR 1291. (NT)    

Special Topics in Diesel Engine Mechanic and Repairer.   (2-1-3)

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student.  This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency.  Course fee $90. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (4706050021).

 

DEMR 1305. (NT)    

Basic Electrical Systems.   (3-2-3)

Basic principles of electrical systems of diesel powered equipment with emphasis on starters, alternators, and batteries. Course fee $90. Certification fee $30. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307.  (4706050021).

 

DEMR 1317. (NT)    

Basic Brake Systems.     (3-2-3)

Basic principles of brake systems of diesel powered equipment.  Emphasis on maintenance, repairs, and troubleshooting.  Course fee $90. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (4706050021).

 

DEMR 1323. (NT)   

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Troubleshooting and Repair.      (3-2-2)

Introduction to heating, ventilation, and air conditioning theory, testing, and repair. Emphasis on refrigerant reclamation, safety procedures, specialized tools, and repairs. Course fee $90. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (4706050021).

 

DEMR 1380. (NT)    

Cooperative Education – Diesel Mechanics Technology/Technician.     (3-1-20)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (4706050021).

 

DEMR 1406. (NT)           

Diesel Engine I.     (4-3-4)

An introduction to the basic principles of diesel engines and systems. Course fee $90. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (4706050021).

 

DEMR 1410. (NT)           

Diesel Engine Testing and Repair.      (4-3-4)

An introduction to testing and repairing diesel engines including related systems specialized tools. Course fee $90. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, DEMR 1406. (4706050021).

 

DEMR 1413 (NT)           

Fuel Systems.            (4-3-4)

In-depth coverage of fuel injector pumps and injection systems.  Pre-requisites:  DEMR 1406, Diesel Engine I, and    DEMR 1410, and Diesel Engine Testing & Repair I.  Course fee $90.

 

DEMR 1421. (NT)           

Power Train I.        (4-3-3)

Fundamentals, repair, and theory of power trains including clutches, transmissions, drive shafts, and differentials. Emphasis on inspection and repair. Course fee $90. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307.(4706050021).

 

DEMR 1371. (NT)          

Alternative Fueled Vehicles.        (3-2-2)

Course Description:  Fundamentals of alternative fuels for passenger and commercial vehicles, including electro-motive power systems, compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, and biodiesel. Pre- and co-requisites:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307.

Fees:  Course fee $90. Sum (4706050021).

 

DEMR 1316. (NT)          

Basic Hydraulics.         (3-2-3)

Fundamentals of hydraulics including components and related systems. Course fee $90. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (4706050021).

 

DEMR 2432. (NT)

Electronic Controls.      (4-3-4)

Advanced skills in diagnostic and programming techniques of electronic control systems.  Pre-requisite:  DEMR 1305, Basic Electrical Systems. Course fee $90.


DRAMA (DRAM)

DRAM 1120; 1121; 2120; 2121. (T)        

Theatre Practicum I; II; III; IV.    (1-0-6)

Open to all students interested in theatre. Students earn credit for work in all areas of technical theatre and participation in theatre productions. May be repeated for a maximum of three semester credit hours. Required of all theatre majors. Course fee $75. F, Sp (5005065326).

 

DRAM 1310. (T)

Introduction to Theatre.     (3-3-0)

A survey of all phases of theatre including its history, dramatic works, stage techniques, production procedures, and relation to fine arts. Recommended for all students of humanities, communications, social sciences, and creative and performing arts. Open to all students. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (5005015126).

 

DRAM 1322. (T).

Stage Movement.        (3-2-4)

An introduction to the principles, practices, and exercises in body techniques, stage movement, and stage combat; emphasis on basic acting skills for developing sensory awareness, ensemble performing, character movement, and body control. Required of all theatre majors. Open to non-theatre majors with instructor approval. F, Sp (5005065426).

 

DRAM 1330. (T)

Stagecraft I.      (3-2-4)

A lecture-laboratory course giving the student a knowledge of the technical aspects of mounting a production on the stage. Includes the study and application of visual aesthetics of design and execution of stage settings, including a study of the physical theatre, scenery construction and painting, properties, lighting, and backstage organization. Required of all theatre majors. Enrollment in Lab required. Open to all students. Course fee $75. F, Sp (5005025126).

 

DRAM 1341. (T)

Makeup.        (3-2-4)

A study of basic makeup techniques for the stage. Design and execution of makeup for the purpose of developing believable characters. Provides practical experience in applying stage makeup in a variety of styles. Required of all theatre majors. Open to all students. F, Sp (5005025226).

 

DRAM 1351. (T)

Acting I.      (3-2-4)

An introduction to the fundamental principles and tools of acting as used in auditions, rehearsals, and performances. This may include ensemble performing, character and script analysis, and basic theater terminology. This exploration will emphasize the development of the actor’s instrument: voice, body and imagination. Instructor Approval Needed. Required of all theatre majors. F (5005065126).

 

DRAM 1352. (T)

Acting II.      (3-2-4)

Exploration and further training within the basic principles and tools of acting, including an emphasis on critical analysis of oneself and others. The tools include ensemble performing, character and script analysis, and basic theater terminology. This will continue the exploration of the development of the actor’s instrument: voice, body and imagination. A continuation of DRAM 1351. Prerequisite: DRAM 1351, or instructor approval. Required of all theatre majors. Sp (5005065126).

 

DRAM 2331. (T)

Stagecraft II.       (3-2-4)

Continued study and application of the methods and components of theatrical production which may include one or more of the following: theater facilities, scenery construction and painting, properties, lighting, costume, makeup, sound and theatrical management. A continuation of DRAM 1330. Prerequisite: DRAM 1330, or instructor approval. Required of all theatre majors. Course fee $75. Sp (5005025126).

 

DRAM 2336. (T)

Voice for the Theatre.      (3-3-0)

Application of the performer's use of the voice as a creative instrument of effective communication. Encourages an awareness of the need for vocal proficiency and employs techniques designed to improve the performer's speaking abilities. Required of all theatre majors. Open to all students. F, Sp (5005065226).

 

DRAM 2366. (T)

Introduction to Cinema.     (3-3-0)

Survey and analyze cinema including history, film techniques, production procedures, selected motion pictures, and cinema’s impact on and reflection of society. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $75. F, Sp (5006025126).

 

DRAM 2389. (T)

Academic Cooperative.         (3-2-4)

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on work experience. In conjunction with class seminars, the individual student will set specific goals and objectives in the study of drama. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Open only by audition. Course fee $75. Su (2401035212).


ECONOMICS (ECON)

ECON 1301. (T)               

Introduction to Economics.      (3-3-0)

A survey of microeconomic and macroeconomic principles for non-business majors.  Microeconomic topics will include supply and demand, consumer behavior, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, international trade, and exchange rates.  Macroeconomic topics will include national income, unemployment, inflation, business cycles, aggregate supply and demand, monetary and fiscal policy, and economic growth. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 1301 and ENGL 0201 or be concurrently enrolled in in ENGL 0307.Note: This course is NOT suitable for 4-year business majors. F (1904025209).

 

ECON 2301. (T)               

Principles of Macroeconomics.    (3-3-0)

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy. Emphasis is on American capitalism, national income, employment, and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301 and eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite courses. F, Sp, Su (4506015125).

 

ECON 2302. (T)                

Principles of Microeconomics.      (3-3-0)

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301 and eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite courses. F, Sp, Su (4506015125).


EDUCATION (EDUC)

EDUC 1300. (T)              

Learning Framework.      (3-3-0)

A study of the research and theory in the psychology of learning, cognition, and motivation; factors that impact learning, and application of learning strategies. Theoretical models of strategic learning, cognition, and motivation serve as the conceptual basis for the introduction of college-level student academic strategies. Students use assessment instruments (e.g., learning inventories) to help them identify their own strengths and weaknesses as strategic learners. Students are ultimately expected to integrate and apply the learning skills discussed across their own academic programs and become effective and efficient learners. Students developing these skills should be able to continually draw from the theoretical models they have learned. Open to all students Co-requisite for students enrolled in MATH 0307 and/or ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, S (4227015125).

 

EDUC 1301. (T)             

Introduction to the Teaching Profession.       (3-3-1)

An enriched, integrated pre-service course and content experience that provides active recruitment and institutional support of students interested in a teaching career, especially in high need fields. The course provides students with opportunities to participate in early field observations at all levels of P-12 schools with varied and diverse student populations and provides students with support from college and school faculty, preferably in small cohort groups, for the purpose of introduction to and analysis of the culture of schooling and classrooms. Course content should be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Course must include a minimum of 16 contact hours of field experience in P-12 classrooms.  Prerequisite: Course requires passing Criminal History Background Check. Liability Insurance Fee of $30 will be charged once annually. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (1301015109).

 

EDUC 2301. (T)              

Introduction to Special Populations.       (3-3-1)

An enriched, integrated pre-service course and content experience that provides an overview of schooling and classrooms from the perspectives of language, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnic and academic diversity, and equity with an emphasis on factors that facilitate learning. The course provides students with opportunities to participate in early field observations of P-12 special populations and should be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Must include a minimum of 16 contact hours of field experience in P-12 classrooms with special populations. Prerequisite: Passing Criminal History Background Check, EDUC 1301 Introduction to the Teaching Profession. Liability Insurance Fee of $30 will be charged once annually. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (1310015109).

 

TECA 1354. (T)        

Child Growth and Development.     (3-3-0)

A study of the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive factors impacting growth and development of children through adolescence. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (1312025209).


EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES PROFESSIONS (EMSP)

EMSP 1147. (NT)    

Pediatric Life Support.       (1-1-0)

Theory and skills necessary for the management of pediatric or neonatal emergencies. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307, EMT Certificate, EMSP 2444, EMSP 2206, EMSP 2330.  Certification fee: $20.  (5109040016).

 

EMSP 1149. (NT)    

Trauma Life Support.    (1-1-0)

Theory and skills necessary for the management of trauma emergencies. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, EMT Certificate, EMSP 1438, EMSP 1456, Co-requisite: EMSP 1471 (if not already completed), EMSP 2305, EMSP 1455, EMSP 1166. Certification Fee $30. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 1165. (NT)

Practicum - Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (Paramedic).      (1-0-9)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 1438 and EMSP 1456. Liability Insurance $70. Drug Test 10 Panel Fee $16.  Background Check Fee $30.

 

EMSP 1166. (NT)    

Practicum - Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (Paramedic).        (1-0-9)

Practical, general workplace training   supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 2205, EMSP 1455, EMSP 1145. Drug Test 10 Panel Fee $16.

 

EMSP 1360. (NT)   

Clinical—Emergency Medical Technology/Technician  (Paramedic).      (3-0-9)                            

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional.  Co-requisite:  EMSP 1501. Background Check Fee $30. CIP:  51.0904

 

EMSP 1391. (NT)   

Special Topics, Pathophysiology.         (3-3-0)

Basic principles of pathophysiology emphasizing paramedic applications. Includes epidemiologic factors that alter the normal physiological processes across the lifespan.  Prerequisite:  EMT Certificate.  CIP:  51.0904

 

EMSP 1438. (NT)    

Introduction to Advanced Practice.      (4-3-2)

Fundamental elements associated with emergency medical services to include preparatory practices, pathophysiology, medication administration, and related topics.  Prerequisite: EMT Certificate or awaiting results from National Registry. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 1471 (if not already completed), EMSP 1456, EMSP 1165. FISDAP Scheduler Fee $84. Course fee $25. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 1455. (NT)    

Trauma Management.    (4-3-2)

Knowledge and skills in the assessment and management of patients with traumatic injuries. Prerequisite: EMT certificate or awaiting results from National Registry. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 1471 (if not already completed), EMSP 2305,  EMSP 1145, EMSP 1166. Course fee $25. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 1456. (NT)    

Patient Assessment and Airway Management.       (4-3-2)

Knowledge and skills required to perform patient assessment, airway management, and artificial ventilation.   Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Prerequisite: EMT Certificate or awaiting results from National Registry. Co-requisite: EMSP 1471 (if not already completed), EMSP 1438, EMSP 1165.  Course fee $25. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 1471. (NT)    

Local Needs, Anatomy and Physiology for Emergency Medical Services Professionals.         (4-4-0)

Introduction to the knowledge of human body systems necessary for emergency medical services professionals as indicated in the United States Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Administration's Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic National Standard Curriculum. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 1501. (NT)    

Emergency Medical Technician.      (5-4-4)

Preparation for certification as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Co-requisite: Current CPR credentials at the healthcare provider level.  FISDAP Scheduler Fee $84. Course fee $25. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 2135. (NT)    

Advanced Cardiac Life Support.        (1-1-0)

Theory and skills necessary for the management of a cardiovascular emergencies as specified by the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307, EMT Certificate, EMSP 1438, EMSP 1456, EMSP 2305, EMSP 2444, EMSP 2330, EMSP 2237. Certification fee:  $20.  (5109040016).

 

EMSP 2167. (NT)    

Practicum - Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (Paramedic).     (1-0-9)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 2444, EMSP 2206, EMSP 2330, EMSP 2135. Liability Insurance $70.  Health Science Fee $125.  Drug Test 10 Panel Fee $16.  Background Check Fee $30.

 

EMSP 2168. (NT)    

Practicum - Emergency Medical Technology/Technician (Paramedic).      (1-0-9)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 2243, EMSP 2434, EMSP 2305. Drug Test 10 Panel Fee $16.

 

EMSP 2237. (NT)    

Emergency Procedures.         (2-1-2)

Application of emergency medical procedures.  This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency.  Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307, EMT Certificate, EMSP 2444, EMSP 2206, EMSP 2330, EMSP 2135. Course fee:  $25.  (5109040016).

 

EMSP 2243. (NT)    

Assessment Based Management.   (2-1-2)

A summarative experience covering comprehensive, assessment-based patient care management for the paramedic level.  Prerequisite: EMT Certificate, EMSP 1438, EMSP 2305, EMSP 2444. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 2434, EMSP 2168. Course fee $25. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 2206. (NT)    

Emergency Pharmacology.     (2-1-2)

A study of drug classifications, actions, therapeutic uses, adverse effects, routes of administration, and calculation of dosages.  Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307. Co-requisites: EMSP 2444, EMSP 2330, EMSP 2135, EMSP 2167.  Course fee $25.

 

EMSP 2330. (NT)    

Special Populations.      (3-2-2)

Knowledge and skills necessary to assess and manage ill or injured patients in diverse populations to include neonatology, pediatrics, geriatrics, and other related topics.  Prerequisite: EMT Certificate, EMSP 1438, EMSP 2305, or with coordinator approval. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 2444, EMSP 2206, EMSP 2135, EMSP 2167.  Course fee $25. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 2305. (NT)    

EMS Operations.       (3-2-2)

Knowledge and skills to safely manage multi-casualty incidents and rescue situations; utilize air medical resources; identify hazardous materials and other specialized incidents.  Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, EMT-Basic certificate, EMSP 1438. Co-requisite: EMSP 1455, EMSP 1145, EMSP 1166.  Course fee $25. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 2434. (NT)    

Medical Emergencies.       (4-3-2)

Knowledge and skills in the assessment and management of patients with medical emergencies, including medical overview, neurology, gastroenterology, immunology, pulmonology, urology, hematology, endocrinology, toxicology, and other related topics.  Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307. Co-requisites: EMSP 2243, EMSP 2168. Course fee $25. (5109040016).

 

EMSP 2444. (NT)

Cardiology.    (4-3-2)

Assessment and management of patients with cardiac emergencies. Includes single and multi-lead ECG interpretation. Prerequisite: EMT Certificate, EMSP 1438, EMSP 2338, EMT-Intermediate certificate with coordinator approval. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, MATH 0307. Co-requisite: EMSP 2330, EMSP 2206, EMSP 2135, EMSP 2167. Course fee $25. (5109040016).


ENGINEERING (ENGR)

ENGR 1201. (T)                

Introduction to Engineering.       (2-1-3)

An introduction to the engineering profession with emphasis on technical communication and team-based engineering design. Prerequisite: MATH 1314. Course fee $50. F or S (1401015110).

 

ENGR 2301. (T) Statics.   (3-3-0)

Basic theory of engineering mechanics, using calculus, involving the description of forces, moments, and couples acting on stationary engineering structures; equilibrium in two and three dimensions; free-body diagrams; friction; centroids; centers of gravity; and moments of inertia. Prerequisite: PHYS 2325 and PHYS 2125, or PHYS 2425. Corequisite: MATH 2414. (1411015210).

 

ENGR 2302. (T) Dynamics.   (3-3-0)

Basic theory of engineering mechanics, using calculus, involving the motion of particles, rigid bodies, and systems of particles; Newton's Laws; work and energy relationships; principles of impulse and momentum; application of kinetics and kinematics to the solution of engineering problems. Prerequisites: ENGR 2301. (1411015310).

 

ENGR 2332. (T)                         

Mechanics of Materials.    (3-3-0)

Stresses, deformations, stress-strain relationships, torsions, beams, shafts, columns, elastic deflections in beams, combined loading, and combined stresses.  Prerequisite Math 2413.  S (1411015110).


ENGLISH (ENGL)

ENGL 0201. (NT)

Developmental Integrated Reading/Writing      (2-2-0)

Institutional credit only.  A course designed to strengthen writing and reading skills, including use of grammar, sentence structure, paragraph and essay development, MLA format, and critical reading skills. Serves as a co-requisite to ENGL 1301 for students who are not TSI-complete in reading and/or writing. Prerequisites: Appropriate Placement Scores or C or better ENGL 0307. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified 1301 section.  Course fee $35. F, Sp. Su. (3201085912).

 

ENGL 0307. (NT)

Integrated Reading and Writing.     (3-3-1)

Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills combined lecture/lab, performance-based course designed to develop students' critical reading and academic writing skills. The focus of the course will be on applying critical reading skills for organizing, analyzing, and retaining material and developing written work appropriate to the audience, purpose, situation, and length of the assignment. The course integrates preparation in basic academic reading skills with basic skills in writing a variety of academic essays. The course fulfills TSI requirements for lower level reading and writing level. Course fee $35. F, Sp (3201085912).

 

ENGL 1301. (T) Composition I.   (3-3-0)

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis. Prerequisite: TSI-complete in writing and reading or as a co-requisite with ENGL 0201. F, Sp, Su (2313015112).

 

ENGL 1302. (T)

Composition II.   (3-3-0)

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions. Prerequisite: "C" or better in ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (2313015112).

 

ENGL 2311. (T)

Technical and Business Writing.   (3-3-0)

Intensive study of and practice in professional settings. Focus on the types of documents necessary to make decisions and take action on the job, such as proposals, reports, instructions, policies and procedures, e-mail messages, letters, and descriptions of products and services. Practice individual and collaborative processes involved in the creation of ethical and efficient documents. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su. (2313035112).

 

ENGL 2322. (T)                            

British Literature I.     (3-3-0)

A survey of the development of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Eighteenth Century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in both ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302. F, Sp, Su (2314045112).

 

ENGL 2323. (T)                            

British Literature II.     (3-3-0)

A survey of the development of British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions. Prerequisites: A grade of  “C” or better in both ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302. F, Sp, Su (2314045112).

 

ENGL 2326. (T)

American Literature.   (3-3-0)

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from among a diverse group of authors for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.  Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in both ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302. F, Sp, Su (2314025112).

 

ENGL 2332. (T)                            

World Literature I.     (3-3-0)

A survey of world literature from the ancient world through the sixteenth century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.  Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in both ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302. F, Sp, Su (1601045213).

 

ENGL 2333. (T)                           

World Literature II.     (3-3-0)

A survey of world literature from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.  Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in both ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302. F, Sp, Su (1601045213).


ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES (ESOL)

ESOL 0311.       

Oral Communication.      (3-3-2)

The purpose of this course is to increase the student's listening comprehension and speaking skills in English. Students listen and evaluate English conversation and discourse as it occurs naturally. Students increase their understanding of grammar and structures and pronunciation and develop vocabulary skills as they listen extensively to spoken English and practice speaking English, and participate in classroom activities. Course fee $35. F, Sp. (3201085512).

 

ESOL 0322.      

Reading and Vocabulary – Intermediate.     (3-3-2)

The purpose of this course is to increase the student's English reading skills including comprehension, vocabulary, and reading rate. Students participate in a variety of reading activities which provide extensive and intensive practice in each skill area. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. Course fee $35. F, Sp, Su. (3201085612).

 

ESOL 0324.      

Reading and Vocabulary – Advanced.      (3-3-2)

The purpose of this course is to increase the student's English reading skills. Students participate in a variety of reading activities which provide extensive and intensive practice in interpreting and evaluating academic and literary texts. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score. Course fee $35. F, Sp, Su. (3201085612).

 

ESOL 0332.      

Grammar for Non-native Speakers - Intermediate.     (3-3-2)

This course is designed for students who wish to improve their understanding and skills in English grammar. The course will include studies and practice of sentence components, tenses, mechanics and other structures of English grammar. Course fee $35. F, Sp. (3201085712).

 

ESOL 0334.      

Grammar for Non-native Speakers – Advanced.     (3-3-2)

This course is designed for speakers who wish to improve their understanding and skills in English grammar.  This course will include studies and practice of sentence components, tenses, mechanics and other structures of English grammar. Course fee $35. F (3201085712).

 

ESOL 0343.       

Writing for Non-native Speakers - Intermediate.     (3-3-2)

Focuses on strategies and techniques of writing and composition. Open only to non-native speakers. The purpose of this course is to increase the student's writing fluency in English using standard rules of English grammar and composition. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. Course fee $35. F, Sp, Su. (3201085412).

 

ESOL 0344.       

Writing for Non-native Speakers - Advanced.      (3-3-2)

The purpose of this course is to increase the student's English academic writing skills. Students   participate in a variety of activities which provide extensive and intensive practice in academic composition techniques. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test score. Course fee $35. F, Sp, Su. (3201085412).


FIRE PROTECTION (FIRS, FIRT)

FIRS 1301. (NT)            

Firefighter Certification I.       (3-2-2)

An introduction to firefighter safety and development. Topics include Texas Commission on Fire Protection Rules and Regulations, firefighter safety, fire science, personal protective equipment, self-contained breathing apparatus, and fire reports and records. The student will discuss core fire service subjects; demonstrate the use of self-contained breathing apparatus; explain and identify fire service reports and records; relate fire service subject matter to firefighting safety and survival. Should be taken in conjunction with II, III, IV, V, VI, and VII. F (4302030000).

 

FIRS 1407. (NT)            

Firefighter Certification II.    (4-3-2)

The study of basic principles and skill development in handling fire service hoses and ladders. Topics include the distribution system of water supply; basic building construction; and emergency service communication, procedures, and equipment. The student will describe hose construction, care, maintenance, and testing; demonstrate hose rolls, drags, carries, and loads; identify the principles of ladder construction, care and testing; identify the types of water distribution systems and demonstrate proficiency in water supply operations; list the types of construction and building material hazards that affect firefighter safety; state the procedures of receiving alarms, and identify alarm devices, equipment, and radio procedures. Should be taken in conjunction with I, III, IV, V, VI, and VII. F (4302030000).

 

FIRS 1313. (NT)            

Firefighter Certification III.    (3-3-0)

General principles of fire apparatus, pump operations, fire streams, and public operations as they relate to fundamental development of basic firefighter skills. The student will identify the types of fire apparatus, describe the operation of fire pumps, demonstrate fire stream operations and fire pump operations, and explain the importance of public relations as a member of fire service. Should be taken in conjunction with I, II, IV, V, VI, and VII. F (4302030000).

 

FIRS 1319. (NT)            

Firefighter Certification IV.     (3-2-2)

A study of equipment, tactics, and procedures used in forcible entry, ventilation, salvage, and overhaul. Preparation for certification as a basic firefighter. The student will identify and safely use, maintain, and clean forcible entry tools; describe the effects of proper ventilation, decisions to ventilate, and demonstrate methods of ventilation; describe the purpose of salvage, demonstrate various folds and rolls of covers, salvage throws, use of water catchalls, and various mop up procedures; describe and identify safety precautions, dangerous building conditions, value of overhaul, and overhaul procedures; and demonstrate safe handling of debris. Should be taken in conjunction with I, II, III, V, VI, and VII. F (4302030000).

 

FIRS 1323. (NT)            

Firefighter Certification V.      (3-2-3)

The study of ropes and knots, rescue procedures and techniques, and hazardous materials. Preparation for certification as a basic firefighter. The student will describe and demonstrate proper rescue techniques to include search, removal, and packing of victims; describe and demonstrate life safety, harnesses, repelling, and vehicle extrication; describe and demonstrate various parts of the rope, various knots, and their uses; and identify definitions of hazardous materials and describe incident management of hazardous materials. Should be taken in conjunction with I, II, III, IV, VI, and VII.  Sp (4302030000).

 

FIRS 1329. (NT)            

Firefighter Certification VI.     (3-3-0)

The study of fire inspection techniques and practices, public transportation, fire cause determination. Topics include fire protection systems, wild land fire, and pre-incident planning. Preparation for certification as a basic firefighter. The student will identify and describe the procedures to determine point of origin, events of fire, cause, factors indicating arson, the protection of evidence, and the importance of securing the fire scene, list the components of pre-incident planning, and perform a facility survey; explain wild land fire suppression terminology and methods including location, sizing of fire, suppression techniques, and safety; describe the purpose of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 13 and NFPA 14 standards applicable to fire protection systems; state recommended procedures using apparatus, NFPA 101, life safety code, applicable to fire prevention inspections. Should be taken in conjunction with I, II, III, IV, V, and VII. Sp (4302030000).

 

FIRS 1433. (NT)            

Firefighter Certification VII.    (4-3-2)

An in-depth study and practice of simulated emergency operations and hands-on live fire training exercises, incident command procedures, and combined operations using proper extinguishing methods. Emphasis on safety. The student will describe the general requirements of National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards applicable to live fire; extinguish or control live fires while using hose streams and portable extinguishers safely and effectively; and operate within a command structure utilized by all participants. Should be taken in conjunction with I, II, III, IV, V, and VI.  Sp (4302030000).

 

FIRT 1311. (NT)           

Fire Service Hydraulics.     (3-3-0)

The use of water in fire protection. Application of hydraulic principles to analyze and solve water supply problems related to fire protection. The student will describe basic principles of hydraulics; identify components of a water distribution system; calculate fire flows for various types of occupancies; explain various types of fire pumps and pump operational procedures; calculate pump pressure for various types of hose lays; and describe various types of nozzles and the application of each type. Sp (4302010000).

 

FIRT 1319. (NT)           

Firefighter Health and Safety.    (3-3-0)

Firefighter occupational safety and health in emergency and non-emergency situations. The student will describe components of a firefighter safety and health program; explain safety practices and procedures related to emergency and non-emergency operations; and outline the components of a firefighter wellness program. F (4302010000).

 

FIRT 1327. (NT)            

Building Construction in the Fire Service.        (3-3-0)

Components of building construction that relate to life safety. Includes relationship of construction elements and building design impacting fire spread in structures. The student will identify types of building construction and fire resistance levels of building materials; describe hazards associated with construction practices; and identify signs of potential structural collapse. F (4302010000).

 

FIRT 1338. (NT)           

Fire Protection Systems.       (3-3-0)

Design and operation of fire detection and alarm systems, heat and smoke control systems, special protection and sprinkler systems, water supply for fire protection, and portable fire extinguishers. The student will identify the applications and explain the operation of fire detection, alarm, and extinguishing systems. F (4302010000).

 

FIRT 1303. (NT)           

Fire and Arson Investigation I.      (3-3-0)

Basic fire and arson investigation practices. Emphasis on fire behavior principles related to fire cause and origin determination. The student will identify the cause and point of origin and the cause of the fire; list possible motives of fire setters; and describe the elements of investigation practices. Sp (4302010000).

 

FIRT 1307. (NT)           

Fire Prevention Codes and Inspections.    (3-3-0)

Local building and fire prevention codes. Fire prevention inspections, practices, and procedures. The student will apply provisions of local building and fire prevention codes to fire prevention inspections; and describe fire inspection practices and procedures including hazard recognition and correction. Sp (4302010000).

 

FIRT 1353. (NT)           

Legal Aspects of Fire Protection.        (3-3-0)

Study of the rights, duties liability concerns, and responsibilities of public fire protection agencies and personnel while performing assigned duties. The student will summarize basic criminal and civil law; discuss relevant tort law; and describe state and federal legal systems. F (4302020000).


GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

GEOG 1303. (T)

World Regional Geography.     (3-3-0)

This course is an introduction to the world’s major regions seen through their defining physical, social, cultural, political, and economic features. These regions are examined in terms of their physical and human characteristics and their interactions. The course emphasizes relations among regions on issues such as trade, economic development, conflict, and the role of regions in the globalization process. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  F, Sp, Su (4507015325).


GEOLOGY (GEOL)

GEOL 1301. (T)                                              

Earth Sciences for Non-Science Majors I (lecture).      (3-3-0)

Survey of geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy. This course should be transferable to any four-year institution in Texas. Credit value: 3 hours. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite courses. (40.0601.51 03).

 

GEOL 1403. (T)                                              

Physical Geology (lecture + lab).        (4-3-3)

Introduction to the study of the materials and processes that have modified and shaped the surface and interior of Earth over time. These processes are described by theories based on experimental data and geologic data gathered from field observations.  This course is designed for a variety of students, including geology majors and non-majors.  It satisfies the basic science requirement for upper level courses. Laboratory activities will cover methods used to collect and analyze earth science data.  Credit value: 4 hours. Prerequisites: Laboratory activities will cover methods used to collect and analyze earth science data.  Credit value: 4 hours. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite courses. Course fee $50. (40.0601.54 03).

 

GEOL 1404. (T)                                             

Historical Geology (lecture + lab).     (4-3-3)

A comprehensive survey of the history of life and major events in the physical development of Earth as interpreted from rocks and fossils. Laboratory activities will introduce methods used by scientists to interpret the history of life and major events in the physical development of Earth from rocks and fossils. Credit value: 4 hours. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite courses.  Course fee $50. (40.0601.54 03).

 

GEOL 1405. (T)                                             

Environmental Science (lecture + lab).     (4-3-3)

A survey of the forces, including humans, that shape our physical and biologic environment, and how they affect life on Earth. Introduction to the science and policy of global and regional environmental issues, including pollution, climate change, and sustainability of land, water, and energy resources. Laboratory activities will cover methods used to collect and analyze environmental data.  Credit value: 4 hours. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite courses. Course fee $50. (03.0103.53 01).

 

GEOL 2389. (T)                                  

Academic Cooperative.      (3-3-0)

An instructional program designed to integrate on-campus study with practical hands-on work experience in the physical sciences.  In conjunction with class seminars, the individual students will set specific goals and objectives in the scientific study of inanimate objects, processes of matter and energy, and associated phenomena. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Eligible to enroll in MATH Co-requisite courses. One semester of geology or related subject and the instructor’s approval.  A special services fee is required. (40.0101.53 03).


GOVERNMENT (GOVT)

GOVT 2305. (T) 

Federal Government.      (3-3-0)

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su.  (4510025125).

 

GOVT 2306. (T)                                              

Texas Government.     (3-3-0)

Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and inter-governmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su. (4510025125).


Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration (HART)

HART 1382. (NT)  Cooperative Education-Heating,  Air Conditioning, Ventilation, & Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician.          (3-1-15)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (1505010011).

 

HART 1383. (NT)   

Cooperative Education-Heating, Air Conditioning, Ventilation, & Refrigeration Maintenance Technology/Technician.      (3-1-15)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (1505010011).

 

HART 1391. (NT)     

Special Topics in Heating, Air Conditioning, & Refrigeration.        (3-3-0)

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (1505010011).

 

HART 1401. (NT)     

Basic Electricity for HVAC.     (4-2-6)

Principles of electricity as required by HVAC including proper use of test equipment, electrical circuits, and component theory and operation. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307.. (1505010011).

 

HART 1403. (NT)    

Air Conditioning Control Principles.       (4-3-4)

A basic study of HVAC and refrigeration controls; troubleshooting of control components; emphasis on use of wiring diagrams to analyze high and low voltage circuits; a review of Ohm's law as applied to air conditioning controls and circuits. Course fee $75. Certification Fee $20. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307, HART 1401. (1505010011).

 

HART 1407. (NT)     

Refrigeration Principles.      (4-3-4)

An introduction to the refrigeration cycle, heat transfer theory, temperature/pressure relationship, refrigerant handling, refrigeration components, and safety. Course fee $75. Certification fee $50. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307 and MATH 0306/0307. (1505010011).

 

HART 1441. (NT)    

Residential Air Conditioning.     (4-3-4)                         

A study of components, applications, and installation of mechanical air conditioning systems including operating conditions, troubleshooting, repair, and charging of air conditioning systems. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307, HART 1407. (1505010011).

 

HART 1445. (NT)   

Gas and Electric Heating.      (4-3-4)

Study of the procedures and principles used in servicing heating systems including gas fired furnaces, and electric heating systems. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307, HART 2434, HART 2436. (1505010011).

 

HART 2434. (NT)     

Advanced Air Conditioning Controls.       (4-3-4)

Theory and application of electrical control devices, electromechanical controls, and/or pneumatic controls. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307, HART 1403. (1505010011).

 

HART 2436. (NT)     

Air Conditioning Troubleshooting.      (4-2-6)

An advanced course in application of troubleshooting principles and use of test instruments to diagnose air conditioning and refrigeration components and system problems including conducting performance tests. Course fee $75. Certification fee $35. Prerequisites Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307, HART 1441. (1505010011).

 

HART 2445. (NT)     

Residential Air Conditioning Systems Design.         (4-3-4)

Study of the properties of air and results of cooling, heating, humidifying or dehumidifying; heat gain and heat loss calculations including equipment selection and balancing the air system. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307, HART 2434, HART 2436. (1505010011).

 

HART 2449. (NT)     

Heat Pumps.       (4-3-4)

A study of heat pumps, heat pump control circuits, defrost controls, auxiliary heat, air flow, and other topics related to heat pump systems. Course fee $75. Certification fee $300. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307, HART 2434, HART 2436. (1505010011).


HISTORY (HIST)

HIST 1301. (T)                

United States History I.   (3-3-0)

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I includes the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government. Prerequisite: TSI complete in Reading and English, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (54010251 25).

 

HIST 1302. (T)                

United States History II.    (3-3-0)

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the Civil War/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include: American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy. Prerequisite: TSI complete in Reading and English, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301.  F, Sp, Su (5401025125).

 

HIST 2311. (T).               

Western Civilization I.     (3-3-0)

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of Europe and the Mediterranean world from human origins to the 17th century. Themes that should be addressed in Western Civilization I include the cultural legacies of Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Byzantium, Islamic civilizations, and Europe through the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Reformations. Prerequisite: TSI complete in Reading and English, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301. F (5401015425).

 

HIST 2312. (T).               

Western Civilization II.    (3-3-0)

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of Europe and the Mediterranean world from the 17th century to the modern era. Themes that should be addressed in Western Civilization II include absolutism and constitutionalism, growth of nation states, the Enlightenment, revolutions, classical liberalism, industrialization, imperialism, global conflict, the Cold War, and globalism. Prerequisite: TSI complete in Reading and English, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301. Sp (5401015425).

 

HIST 2321. (T)                

World Civilizations I.    (3-3-0)

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the world from the emergence of human cultures through the 15th century. The course examines major cultural regions of the world in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania and their global interactions over time. Themes include the emergence of early societies, the rise of civilizations, the development of political and legal systems, religion and philosophy, economic systems and trans-regional networks of exchange. The course emphasizes the development, interaction and impact of global exchange. Prerequisite: TSI complete in Reading and English, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su(5401015325)

 

HIST 2322. (T)                

World Civilizations II.    (3-3-0)

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, religious, and intellectual history of the world from the 15th century to the present. The course examines major cultural regions of the world in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania and their global interactions over time. Themes include maritime exploration and transoceanic empires, nation/state formation and industrialization, imperialism, global conflicts and resolutions, and global economic integration. The course emphasizes the development, interaction and impact of global exchange. Prerequisite: TSI complete in Reading and English, or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 0201/ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (5401015325).


INDUSTRIAL MAINTENANCE TECHNOLOGY  (ELPT, ENTC, HYDR, INMT, MCHN, PFPB)

ELPT 1311. (NT)           

Basic Electrical Theory.    (3-2-4)

Basic theory and practice of electrical circuits. Includes calculations as applied to alternating and direct current. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (460401).

 

ELPT 2319. (NT)           

Programmable Logic

Controllers I.     (3-2-4)

Fundamental concepts of programmable logic controllers, principles of operation, and numbering systems as applied to electrical controls. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (460301).

 

ENTC 1347. (NT)          

Safety and Ergonomics.    (3-2-4)

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) safety guidelines including electrical, chemical, and hazardous material safety. Ergonomic considerations to include repetitive motion, plant layout, and machine design. Industrial safety awareness, accident cost and prevention,, and workman's compensation issues. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150000).

 

HYDR 1301. (NT)         

Rigging and Conveying Systems.     (3-2-4)

Introduction to directing and moving heavy objects, selecting the appropriate rigging equipment, in conjunction with the suitable hardware and lifting devices with an emphasis on inspection, care, and maintenance of rigging equipment.  Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (151103).

 

HYDR 1345. (NT)         

Hydraulics and Pneumatics.    (3-2-4)

Discussion of the fundamentals of hydraulics and pneumatics, components of each system, and the operations, maintenance, and analysis of each system. Course fee $75. Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150613).

 

INMT 1305. (NT)          

Introduction to Industrial Maintenance.      (3-2-4)

Basic mechanical skills and repair techniques common to most fields of industrial maintenance. Topics include precision measuring instruments and general safety rules common in industry, including lock-out/tag-out. Course fee $75. Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150613).

 

INMT 1355. (NT)          

Industrial Power Plant Systems.        (3-2-4)

A study of the principles of operation and maintenance of industrial power plants. Emphasis will be placed on component replacement, tune-up, and field adjustments of engine systems. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150613).

 

INMT 1380. (NT)          

Cooperative Education.     (3-1-14)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150613).

 

INMT 2301. (NT)          

Machinery Installation.       (3-2-4)

Students utilize skills acquired in previous studies. Machinery foundation, locations, installation, and alignment activities are practiced and tested. Emphasis is on the various methods of shaft alignment including laser shaft alignment. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150613).

 

INMT 2303. (NT)          

Pumps, Compressors, and Mechanical Drives.    (3-2-4)

A study of the theory and operations of various types of pumps and compressors. Topics include mechanical power transmission systems including gears, v-belts, and chain drives. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150613).

 

INMT 2345. (NT)           

Industrial Troubleshooting.     (3-2-4)

An advanced study of the techniques used in troubleshooting various types of industrial equipment to include mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, and pneumatic systems and their control devices. Emphasis will be placed on the use of schematics and diagrams in conjunction with proper troubleshooting procedures. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150613).

 

MCHN 1343. (NT)         

Machine Shop Mathematics.     (3-2-4)

Designed to prepare the student with technical, applied mathematics that will be necessary in future machine shop-related courses. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (150613).

 

PFPB 1305. (NT)            

Basic Blueprint Reading for Pipefitters.      (3-2-4)

Reading, interpreting, and sketching piping drawings.  Includes isometric and orthographic views.  Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (460502).

 

PFPB 2307 (NT)

Pipe Fabrication and Installation 1.     (3-2-4)

Pipe fabrication and various materials and installation of pipe supports.  Course fee $75.  Prerequisites:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (460502).

 

PFPB 2308. (NT)           

Piping Standards and Materials.        (3-2-4)

Identification, description, and application of piping standards and specifications. Includes identification and use of various metallic and non-metallic piping materials, identification and installation of valves, and material take-offs. Course fee $75. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307.  (460502).


INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA (IMED)

IMED 1316. (NT)            

Web Design I.      (3-2-4)

Instruction in web page design and related graphic design issues including mark-up languages, web sites, and browsers. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. ARTC 1302 Digital Imaging I. Course fee $35. F, Sp (1008010007).

 

IMED 1341. (NT)            

Interface Design.      (3-2-4)

Skill development in the interface design process including selecting interfaces relative to a project's content and delivery system. Emphasis on aesthetic issues such as iconography, screen composition, colors, and typography. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. IMED 1316 Web Design I. Course fee $35. Sp (1108010007).

 

IMED 2388. (NT)            

Internship - Digital Communication and Media/Multimedia.     (3-1-10)

A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer. Practical experience is simultaneously related to theory. Direct supervision is provided by the faculty or the work supervisor. An internship may be a paid or unpaid learning experience. F, Sp (0907020006).


INSTRUMENTATION AND ELECTRICAL TECHNOLOGY (CETT, DFTG, ELPT, INCR, INTC)

DFTG 1325. (NT)     

Blueprint Reading and Sketching.       (3-2-4)

An introduction to reading and interpreting working drawings for fabrication processes and associated trades. Use of sketching techniques to create pictorial and multiple-view drawings. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307.  Course fee $75. F, Sp (1513010011).

 

ELPT 1311. (NT)           

Basic Electrical Theory.      (3-2-4)

Basic theory and practice of electrical circuits. Includes calculations as applied to alternating and direct current. Course fee $75. F, Sp. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. (460401).

 

ELPT 1225. (NT)      

National Electrical Code I.     (2-2-1)

An introductory study of the National Electric Code (NEC) for those employed in fields requiring knowledge of the Code. Emphasis on wiring design, protection, methods, and materials; equipment for general use; and basic calculations. Prerequisites: ELPT 1321 and eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Course fee $55. F, Sp (4603010011).

 

ELPT 1321. (NT)      

Introduction to Electrical Safety and Tools.       (3-3-0)

Safety rules and regulations. Includes the selection, inspection, use, and maintenance of common tools for electricians. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. F, Sp (4603010011).

 

ELPT 1457. (NT)      

Industrial Wiring.     (4-3-3)

Wiring methods used for industrial installations. Includes motor circuits, raceway and bus way installations, proper grounding techniques, and associated safety procedures. Prerequisites: ELPT 1321. Course fee $75. Sp (4603010011).

 

ELPT 2319. (NT)      

Programmable Logic Controllers I.     (3-2-4)

Fundamental concepts of programmable logic controllers, principles of operation, and numbering systems as applied to electrical controls. Prerequisites: INTC 1357. Course fee $75. Sp (4603010011).

 

ELPT 2355. (NT)

Programmable Logic Controllers II.    (3-2-4)

Advanced concepts in programmable logic controllers and their applications and interfacing to industrial controls. Prerequisite: ELPT 2319. Course fee $75. F.

(4603010011)

 

INCR 1302. (NT)      

Physics of Instrumentation.     (3-2-4)

An introduction to simple pneumatic loops. Introduction to pressure, temperature, level, and flow transmitters and the various transducers used in the detection of changes in process variables. Prerequisites: INTC 1305. Course fee $55. Sp (1504040011).

 

INTC 1305. (NT)      

Introduction to Instrumentation.        (3-3-0)

A survey of the instrumentation field and the professional requirements of the instrumentation technician. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. F, Sp (1504040011).

 

INTC 1307. (NT)      

Instrumentation Test Equipment.      (3-2-4)

Theory and application of instrumentation test equipment. Emphasizes accuracy, limitations of instruments, and calibration techniques. Pre or Co-requisite: ELPT 1321 and INTC 1305. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Course fee $55. F, Sp (1504040011).

 

INTC 1353. (NT)      

Analog Controls II.     (3-2-4)

Analog electrical controls in industrial processes. Includes electrical distribution, motor controls, relay logic, and ladder logic. Prerequisites: INCR 1302 and MATH 1332 or MATH 1342 or higher. Course fee $55. F (1504040011).

 

INTC 1357. (NT)        

AC/DC Motor Control.     (3-2-4)

A study of electric motors and motor control devices common to a modern industrial environment. A presentation of motor characteristics with emphasis on starting, speed control, and stopping systems. Prerequisites: ELPT 1311. Course fee $55. F, Sp (1504040011).

 

INTC 2305. (NT)      

Instrumentation Hardware Installation II.     (3-2-4)

Instrumentation skills in tubing and piping, measuring, layout, and testing. Includes instrumentation wiring, circuitry, heat tracing, chemical treatment, and related calculations. Pre or Co-requisites: ELPT 1457. Course fee $55. F, Sp (1504040011).

 

INTC 2330. (NT)      

Instrumentation Systems Troubleshooting.    (3-2-4)

Techniques for troubleshooting instrumentation systems in a process environment. Includes troubleshooting upsets in processes. Prerequisites: INTC 2305. Course fee $55. Sp (1504040011).

 

INTC 2388. (NT)       

Internship – Instrumentation Technology/Technician.       (3-0-21)

A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer. Instructor approval is require for registration in the course. F, Sp & Su (1504040011).



JOURNALISM (COMM) - See Communications


KINESIOLOGY (KINE)

KINE 1100. (T)           

Concepts of Men's Basketball.    (1-0-3)

Provides learning opportunities to male students with exceptional skills in basketball and who are able to compete at the intercollegiate level. Restricted to students participating in the intercollegiate basketball program the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 1101. (T)          

Concepts of Men's Basketball.      (1-0-3)

Provides learning opportunities to male students with exceptional skills in basketball and who are able to compete at the intercollegiate level. Restricted to students participating in the intercollegiate basketball program the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1102. (T)          

Concepts of Women's Basketball.       (1-0-3)

Provides learning opportunities to female students with exceptional skills in basketball. Restricted to freshman participating in the women's intercollegiate basketball program for the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 1103. (T)          

Concepts of Women's Basketball.       (1-0-3)

Provides learning opportunities to female students with exceptional skills in basketball. Restricted to freshman participating in the women's intercollegiate basketball program for the spring semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1104. (T)          

Dance and Drill I.       (1-0-3)

Instruction in drill team techniques including stretching, kicking and marching. Dance suitable for the football field including jazz, kick, military and prop routines. Restricted to students selected during a one-week training session in July. Students perform as a large group at football games, conventions, parades and community functions. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 1105. (T)          

Dance and Drill II.      (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1104. Emphasis on dance suitable for the stage, including jazz, tap, novelty, theatrical, and kick routines. Students create and produce a spring variety show, develop the theme, assist with dance choreography, design and construct stage sets and scenery, design costumes, and write the script. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1108. (T)          

Twirling.     (1-0-3)

This course is designed for students in the performing group, the Kilgore College Twirlers. Instruction is designed for precision skill development for twirling. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 1109. (T)          

Twirling.      (1-0-3)

This course is designed for students in the performing group, the Kilgore College Twirlers. Instruction is designed for precision skill development for twirling. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1110. (T)          

Weight Training.      (1-0-3)

Development of strength and endurance with instruction on physical fitness using modern weight equipment. Course fee $50. F, Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1112. (T)          

Exercise & Fitness.      (1-0-3)

Instruction in the use of low-resistance exercises and exercise machines designed to improve cardiovascular fitness and build aerobic power. Course fee $50. F, Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1116. (T)          

Body Mechanics.     (1-0-3)

Emphasis on "do-it-yourself" improvement in body appearance and condition. Course fee $50. F, Sp, Su (3601085123).

 

KINE 1117. (T)          

Beginning Yoga.     (1-0-3)

Course Description: Instruction in the ancient practice of physical postures, breathing exercises, and mental awareness can lead the practitioner to a deep sense of well-being. Exercises will increase strength, flexibility, stamina, and balance throughout the body as well as stress reduction and revitalization of spirit. The emphasis will be on developing personal discipline and body control. Course fee $50. F, Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1120. (T)          

Basketball.       (1-0-3)

Instruction of basketball rules and skills with opportunity to practice and play. Course fee $50. F, Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1125. (T)          

Concepts of Softball.      (1-0-3)

Provides learning opportunities for female students with exceptional skills in softball. Restricted to freshman participating in the women's intercollegiate softball program for the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. F. (3601085123).

 

KINE 1126. (T)          

Concepts of Softball.     (1-0-3)

Provides learning opportunities for female students with exceptional skills in softball. Restricted to freshman participating in the women's intercollegiate softball program for the spring semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. Sp. (3601085123).

 

KINE 1142. (T)           

Basic Techniques of Athletic Training I.       (1-0-3)

This course consists of directed practical experiences for working with athletes and the physically active population. Students will work toward mastery of specific competencies and proficiencies in the areas of Athletic Training, acute care of injuries, illnesses, and risk management. Skills will be instructed under the supervision of a qualified instructor. Co requisite: MDCA 1313; Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 1143. (T)          

Basic Techniques of Athletic Training II.        (1-0-3)

This course consists of directed practical experiences for working with athletes and the physically active population. Students will work toward mastery of specific competencies and proficiencies in the areas of basic pharmacology and nutrition, acute care of injuries, illnesses, taping, wrapping and padding and specific injury management. Skills will be instructed under the supervision of a qualified instructor. Pre-requisites: KINE 2156 Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1149. (T)          

Concepts of Football.     (1-0-3)

Provides learning opportunities to those students with exceptional skills in football. Restricted to students participating in the intercollegiate football program the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 1150. (T)           

Concepts of Football.     (1-0-3)

Provides learning opportunities to those students with exceptional skills in football. Restricted to students participating in the intercollegiate football program the spring semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 1238. (T)          

Introduction to Physical Fitness & Sport.    (2-1-2)

Course develops skills for identifying, achieving and assessing the various aspects of physical fitness. Aids students in formulating personal fitness programs and is recommended as an option of KINE majors and individuals with an interest in learning recommended approaches to health improvement. Course fee $50. F, Sp, Su (3105015223).

 

KINE 1247. (T)          

Tap and Jazz I.        (2-1-2)

Intermediate level tap & jazz using rhythm, lyric & rock jazz styles. Prerequisite: DANC 1341 or the instructor's approval. Course fee $50. F (3601145123).

 

KINE 1248. (T)          

Tap and Jazz II.      (2-1-2)

Continuation of KINE 1247. Prerequisite: KINE 1247 or the instructor's approval. Course fee $50. S (3601145123).

 

KINE 1301. (T)          

Foundations of Kinesiology.      (3-3-0)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to human movement that includes the historical development of physical education, exercise science, and sport.  This course offers the student both an introduction to the knowledge base, as well as, information on expanding career opportunities.  F (3105015223).

 

KINE 1304. (T)

Personal/Community Health.   (3-3-0)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals, concepts, strategies, applications, and contemporary trends related to understanding personal and/or community health issues.  This course also focuses on empowering various populations with the ability to practice healthy living, promote healthy lifestyles, and enhance individual well-being. F (5115045116).

 

KINE 1306. (T)          

Safety-First Aid.      (3-3-0)

Fundamentals of first aid, safety, accident prevention, and care of athletic injuries. F, Sp (5115045316).

 

KINE 1308. (T)          

Sports Officiating.      (3-3-0)

Course for developing skills in officiating football and track and field events. Instruction of rules, techniques, scoring, judging and equipment related to the sport of track and field. Sp (3101015123).

 

KINE 1321. (T)          

Principles of Coaching Football.         (3-3-0)

A study of the principles of coaching through lectures, films, and current literature. Emphasis is on formation and strategies from the coaching view. F (3105055123).

 

KINE 1322. (T)          

Principles of Coaching Basketball.       (3-3-0)

A study of the principles of coaching through lectures, demonstrations, practice, and current literature in basketball. F (3105055123).

 

KINE 1338. (T)          

Concepts of Physical Fitness – Structure and Function.        (3-3-0)

Concepts and use of selected physiological variables of fitness, individual test and consultation and organization of sports and fitness programs. Course will include the structure and functions of the various systems of the human body and how they relate to physical activity. F (3105015123).

 

KINE 1346. (T)          

Drug Use and Abuse.     (3-3-0)

The study of use and abuse of drugs in today's society with emphasis on physiological, sociological and psychological factors. (5115045216).

 

KINE 2100. (T)          

Advanced Concepts of Men's Basketball.    (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1100. A course for sophomore male students with exceptional knowledge and skills in men's basketball. Restricted to students participating in the intercollegiate level men's basketball program for the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 2101. (T)          

Advanced Concepts of Men's Basketball.     (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1101. A course for sophomore male students with exceptional knowledge and skills in men's basketball. Restricted to students participating in the intercollegiate level men's basketball program in the spring semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 2102. (T)          

Advanced Concepts of Women's Basketball.      (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1102. A course for sophomore female students with exceptional knowledge and skills in women's basketball. Restricted to students participating in the intercollegiate level women's basketball program in the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 2103. (T)          

Advanced Concepts of Women's Basketball.       (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1103. A course for sophomore female students with exceptional knowledge and skills in women's basketball. Restricted to students participating in the intercollegiate level of women's basketball program in the spring semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 2104. (T)          

Dance and Drill III.        (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1105. Advanced instruction in drill team techniques including stretching, kicking and marching. Enrollment is restricted to students selected during a one-week training session in July. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 2105. (T)          

Dance and Drill IV.          (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 2104. Emphasis on advanced dance suitable for the stage. Students create and produce a spring variety show for which they develop the theme, assist with dance choreography, design and construct stage sets and scenery, design costumes, and write the script. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 2108. (T)          

Advanced Twirling.        (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1108. Restricted to students that are Kilgore College Twirlers. Provides instruction for advanced skill development in twirling. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 2109. (T)          

Advanced Twirling.        (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1109. Restricted to students that are Kilgore College Twirlers. Provides instruction for advanced skill development in twirling. Course fee $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 2117. (T)          

Intermediate Yoga.         (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1117 with exposure to intermediate and advanced postures, relaxation, and concentration exercises. Course fee $50. F, Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 2125. (T)          

Advanced Concepts of Softball.        (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1125. A course for sophomore female students who are eligible to compete at the intercollegiate level of women's softball the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. F. (3601085123).

 

KINE 2126. (T)          

Advanced Concepts of Softball.        (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1126. A course for sophomore female students who are eligible to compete at the intercollegiate level of women's softball the spring semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. Sp. (3601085123).

 

KINE 2149. (T)          

Advanced Concepts of Football.        (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1149. Provides learning experiences for those sophomore male students possessing exceptional athletic skills in football and who are participating in the intercollegiate level football program in the fall semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fee $50. F (3601085123).

 

KINE 2150. (T)          

Advanced Concepts of Football.          (1-0-3)

Continuation of KINE 1150. Provides learning experiences for those sophomore male students with exceptional athletic skills in football and who participating in the intercollegiate level football program in the spring semester. Minimum of three class hours per week. Course fees $50. Sp (3601085123).

 

KINE 2156. (T)          

Taping and Bandaging.      (1-0-3)

The course provides the fundamental taping and bandaging techniques used in the prevention and care of athletic related injuries. The course will include a practical interaction with the physically active on issue of injury rehabilitation. Course fee $50. F (5109135116).

 

KINE 2247. (T)          

Tap and Jazz III.        (2-1-2)

Continuation of KINE 1248 with refinement of tap and jazz forms of dance. Prerequisite: KINE 1248 or the instructor's approval. Course fee $50. F (3601145123).

 

KINE 2248. (T)          

Tap and Jazz IV.        (2-1-2)

Continuation of KINE 2247. Prerequisite: KINE 2247 or the instructor's approval. Course fee $50. Sp (3601145123).

 

KINE 2356. (T)          

Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries.        (3-3-0)

Prevention and care of athletic injuries with emphasis on qualities of a good athletic trainer avoiding accidents and injuries, recognizing signs and symptoms of specific sports injuries and conditions, immediate and long-term care of injuries, and administration procedures in athletic training . Recommended Co-requisite: KINE 1143 but not required. Sp (5109135216).


 LEGAL ASSISTING (LGLA)

LGLA 1303. (NT)

Legal Research.       (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 2310) Presents legal research techniques emphasizing the paralegal’s role. Law library techniques and computer assisted legal research. Locate, read, and understand primary and secondary legal authority; design and implement effective research strategies; and be familiar with computer assisted legal research tools and the proper role of these tools. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Lab Fee $35. F (2203020004).

 

LGLA 1305. (NT)     

Legal Writing.     (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 2314) Fundamentals of legal writing techniques including case and fact analysis, citation formats, and legal writing styles emphasizing the paralegal’s role in legal writing.  Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 1307. (NT)     

Introduction to Law and the Legal Professions.      (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 1310) Provides an overview of the law and the legal professions. Topics include legal concepts, systems, and terminology; substantive areas of law and the federal and state judicial systems; ethical obligations and regulations; professional trends and issues with particular emphasis on the paralegal. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  F, Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 1345. (NT)     

Civil Litigation.     (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 1314) Presents fundamental concepts and procedures of civil litigation with emphasis on the paralegal's role. Topics include pretrial, trial, and post-trial phases of litigation. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  F Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 1351. (NT)     

Contracts.       (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 2326) Presents fundamental concepts of contract law with emphasis on the paralegal's role. Topics include formation, performance, and enforcement of contracts under the common law and the Uniform Commercial Code. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.   F and alternate Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 1353. (NT)     

Wills, Trusts, and Probate Administration.       (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 2322) Presents fundamental concepts of the law of wills, trusts, and probate administration with emphasis on the paralegal's role. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 1355. (NT)     

Family Law.       (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 2318) Presents fundamental concepts of family law with emphasis on the paralegal's role. Topics include formal and informal marriages, divorce, annulment, marital property, and the parent-child relationship. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  F Sp, (2203020004).

 

LGLA 1391. (NT)     

Special Topics in Legal Assistant/Paralegal.       (3-3-0)

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  (2203020004).

 

LGLA 2303. (NT)     

Torts and Personal Injury Law.         (3-3-0)

Presents fundamental concepts of tort and personal injury law with emphasis on the paralegal's role. Topics include intentional torts, negligence, and strict liability. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 2307. (NT)     

Law Office Management.       (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 1322) Fundamentals of principles and structure of management, administration and substantive systems in the law office. Includes law practice technology as applied to paralegals. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 2309. (NT)     

Real Property.         (3-3-0)

(Formerly LEGA 2330) Presents fundamental concepts of real property law with emphasis on the paralegal's role. Topics include the nature of real property, rights and duties of ownership, land use, voluntary and involuntary conveyances, and the recording of and searching for real estate documents. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 2313. (NT)     

Criminal Law and Procedure.            (3-3-0)

Fundamental concepts of criminal law and procedure from arrest to final disposition including principles of federal and state law emphasizing the role of the paralegal in the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  F, Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 2333. (NT)     

Advanced Legal Document Preparation.          (3-3-0)

Use of office technology skills in preparation of legal documents based on hypothetical fact situations drawn from various areas including real estate, family law, contracts, litigation, and business organizations. Prerequisites: LGLA 1307, LGLA 1345 (may be taken concurrently with LGLA 1345) Lab Fee $35. (2203020004).

 

LGLA 2335. (NT)     

Advanced Civil Litigation.          (3-3-0)

Implementation of advanced civil litigation techniques with emphasis on the paralegal's role. Builds upon skills acquired in prior civil litigation courses. Prerequisites: LGLA 1345. Sp (2203020004).

 

LGLA 2380. (NT)      

Cooperative Education – Legal Assistant/Paralegal.       (3-0-21)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Sp (2203020004).


MATHEMATICS (MATH, NCBM)

Note: Students must earn a grade of "C" or better in a mathematics course in order to continue in any mathematics sequence.

The department offers courses in a variety of formats including lecture with an arranged lab, lecture with lab combined, modular, hybrid, and web-based. For more information go to www.kilgore.edu/math_courses.

MATH 0132. (NT)

Contemporary Mathematics Support Course.         (1-1-0)

Institutional Credit Only. This course is designed to strengthen mathematical skills and concepts included in MATH 1332.  It serves as a co-requisite to MATH 1332 for students who are not TSI-complete in mathematics.  Prerequisites: C or better in Beginning Algebra (MATH 0306 or MATH 0307) or TSI score of 343-349. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified MATH 1332 section. F, Sp, Su (3201045319).

 

MATH 0142. (NT)

Elementary Statistical Methods Support Course.      (1-1-0)

Institutional Credit Only. This course is designed to strengthen mathematical skills and concepts included in MATH 1342.  It serves as a co-requisite to MATH 1342 for students who are not TSI-complete in mathematics.  Prerequisites: C or better in Beginning Algebra (MATH 0306 or MATH 0307) or TSI score of 343-349. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified MATH 1342 section. F, Sp, Su (3201045319).

 

MATH 0214. (NT)

College Algebra Support Course.    (2-2-0)

Institutional Credit Only. This course is designed to strengthen mathematical skills and concepts included in MATH 1314.  It serves as a co-requisite to MATH 1314 for students who are not TSI-complete in mathematics.  Prerequisites: C or better in Beginning Algebra (MATH 0306 or MATH 0307) or TSI score of 343-349. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified MATH 1314 section. F, Sp, Su (3201045319).

 

MATH 0224. (NT)

Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences Support Course.     (2-2-0)

Institutional Credit Only. This course is designed to strengthen mathematical skills and concepts included in MATH 1324.  It serves as a co-requisite to MATH 1324 for students who are not TSI-complete in mathematics.  Prerequisites: C or better in Beginning Algebra (MATH 0306 or MATH 0307) or TSI score of 343-349. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified 1324 section. F, Sp, Su (3201045319).

 

MATH 0307. (NT)     

Beginning Algebra

(Modular Format)     (3-3-1)

Institutional credit only. This course reviews basic algebra skills. Topics include operations with real numbers, solving equations and inequalities, graphs of linear equations and inequalities, writing equations of lines, functions, solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, operations with polynomials, and applications. Topics will be presented in a modular format. Students work through the modules on a computer with the assistance of an instructor. Students must achieve mastery on each module before progressing to the next module. Since it is a modular approach, students can progress faster through material that is familiar and reserve more time for material that is new. One hour of lab time is required each week in the Math Learning Center. Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score. Course fee $50. F, Sp, Su (3201045119).  Note:  Once a student completes MATH 0307, they are eligible to take the appropriate college level course along with the designated support course. 

 

MATH 0107 (NT)       

Developmental Mathematics (BASE NCBO)      (0-0-1)

The BASE NCBO supports students in developing skills, strategies, and reasoning needed to succeed in mathematics, including communication and appropriate use of technology. Topics include the study of numeracy and the real number system; algebraic concepts, notation and reasoning; quantitative relationships; mathematical models; and problem solving. This intervention is designed specifically for students assessed at BASE levels 3-4 and must be part of a student’s co-enrollment (co-requisite) enrollment in MATH 0307: as a mainstreamed intensifier providing contact hours for additional, just-in-time instructional support for the student’s success in Beginning Algebra, or as a contextualized and/or integrated basic skills instructional support for a Career/Technical Education course.  An additional hour of lab time is required each week in the Math Learning Center.  F, Sp, Su. (3201045519).

 

MATH 1314. (T)

College Algebra.     (3-3-0)

In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included.  An instructor-approved graphing calculator will be required. Prerequisite: TSI Complete in Math. F, Sp, Su (2701015419).  Note: For Pathways sections of MATH 1314, pre-requisite is C or better in Beginning Algebra (MATH 0306 or MATH 0307) or TSI score of 343-349. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified MATH 0214 section. 

 

MATH 1316. (T)        

Plane Trigonometry.      (3-3-0)

In-depth study and applications of trigonometry including definitions, identities, inverse functions, solutions of equations, graphing, and solving triangles. Additional topics such as vectors, polar coordinates and parametric equations may be included. An instructor-approved graphing calculator will be required. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or appropriate score on an additional test required by the mathematics department. F, Sp, Su (2701015319).

 

MATH 1324. (T)       

Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences.     (3-3-0)

The application of common algebraic functions, including polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational, to problems in business, economics, and the social sciences are addressed. The applications include mathematics of finance, including simple and compound interest and annuities; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear programming; and probability, including expected value. The content level of MATH 1324 is at or above the level of college algebra, MATH 1314. An instructor-approved graphing calculator will be required. Prerequisite: TSI Complete in Math. F, Sp, Su (2703015219).  Note: For Pathways sections of MATH 1324, pre-requisite is C or better in Beginning Algebra (MATH 0306 or MATH 0307) or TSI score of 343-349. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified MATH 0224 section. 

 

MATH 1325. (T)        

Calculus for Business and Social Sciences.     (3-3-0)

This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, graphing and optimization, and integration of elementary functions, with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and social sciences. This course is not a substitute for MATH 2413, Calculus I. Prerequisites: MATH 1314 or MATH 1324 or special permission of the department chairperson. F, Sp, Su (2703015319).

 MATH 1332. (T)

Contemporary Mathematics    (3-3-0)

Intended for Non STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) majors. Topics include introductory treatments of sets and logic, financial mathematics, probability and statistics with appropriate applications. Number sense, proportional reasoning, estimation, technology, and communication should be embedded throughout the course. Additional topics may be covered. Prerequisite: TSI complete in Math.  F, Sp, Su (2701015119).  Note: For Pathways sections of MATH 1332, pre-requisite is C or better in Beginning Algebra (MATH 0306 or MATH 0307) or TSI score of 343-349. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified MATH 0132 section. 

 

MATH 1342. (T)

Elementary Statistical Methods.     (3-3-0)

This course is a study of collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability.  Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.  Prerequisites: TSI complete in Math. An instructor-approved graphing calculator will be required. F, Sp, Su (2705015119).  Note: For Pathways sections of MATH 1342, pre-requisite is C or better in Beginning Algebra (MATH 0306 or MATH 0307) or TSI score of 343-349. Also, students must enroll concurrently into specified MATH 0142 section. 

 

MATH 1350. (T)        

Mathematics for Teachers I.     (3-3-0)

This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics and skills.  It includes the development of the following:  sets, functions, numeration systems, number theory, and properties of the various number systems with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking.  Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or an appropriate score on an additional test required by the mathematics department. F, Sp, Su (2701015619).

 

MATH 1351. (T)        

Mathematics for Teachers II.      (3-3-0)

This course is intended to build or reinforce a foundation in fundamental mathematics concepts of geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking.  Prerequisite: MATH 1314 or an appropriate score on an additional test required by the mathematics department. F, Sp, Su (2701015719).

 

MATH 2318. (T)        

Linear Algebra.     (3-3-0)

Introduces and provides models for application of the concepts of vector algebra. Topics include finite dimensional vector spaces and their geometric significance; representing and solving systems of linear equations using multiple methods, including Gaussian elimination and matrix inversion; matrices; determinants; linear transformations; quadratic forms; eigenvalues and eigenvector; and applications in science and engineering.  An instructor-approved graphing calculator will be required. Students will utilize MAPLE software to solve selected problems. Prerequisite: MATH 2414. F (2701016319).

 

MATH 2320. (T)        

Differential Equations.       (3-3-0)

Ordinary differential equations, including linear equations, systems of equations, equations with variable coefficients, existence and uniqueness of solutions, series solutions, singular points, transform methods and boundary value problems; applications of differential equations to real-world problems. An instructor approved graphing calculator will be required. Students will utilize MAPLE software to solve selected problems. Prerequisite: MATH 2414. Su (2701016419).

 

MATH 2412. (T)        

Pre-Calculus Math.      (4-4.5-0)

In-depth combined study of algebra, trigonometry, and other topics for calculus readiness. An instructor-approved graphing calculator will be required. Prerequisite: TSI complete and four years of college-preparatory mathematics including trigonometry. F, Sp (2701015819).

 

MATH 2413. (T)        

Calculus I.      (4-4.5-0)

Limits and continuity; the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; definition of the derivative of a function and techniques of differentiation; applications of the derivative to maximizing or minimizing a function; the chain rule, mean value theorem, and rate of change problems; curve sketching; definite and indefinite integration of algebraic, trigonometric and transcendental functions, with an application to calculation of areas. An instructor approved graphing calculator is required. Students will utilize MAPLE software to solve selected problems. Prerequisites: Math 1314 and Math 1316, or Math 2412, or an appropriate score on an additional test required by the mathematics department. F, Sp, Su (2701015919).

 

MATH 2414. (T)        

Calculus II.      (4-4.5-0)

Differentiation and integration of transcendental functions; parametric equations and polar coordinates; techniques of integration; sequences and series; 
improper integrals. An instructor-approved graphing calculator will be required. Students will utilize MAPLE software to solve selected problems. Prerequisite: Math 2413. F, Sp (2701016019).

 

MATH 2415. (T)        

Calculus III.    (4-4.5-0)

Advanced topics in calculus, including vectors and vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, and Jacobians; application of the line integral, including Green's Theorem, the Divergence Theorem, and Stokes' Theorem. An instructor-approved graphing calculator will be required. Students will utilize MAPLE to solve selected problems. Prerequisite: Math 2414. Sp (2701016119)


MEDICAL ASSISTANT (MDCA)

MDCA 1205. (NT)

Medical Law and Ethics      (2-2-0)

Instruction in principles, procedures, and regulations involving legal and ethical relationships among physicians, patients, and medical assistants in ambulatory care settings. Prerequisite: MDCA 1313 (Medical Terminology). F, Sp, Su (51.0801).

 

MDCA 1313. (NT)                          

Medical Terminology.      (3-3-0)

A study and practical application of a medical vocabulary system. Includes structure, recognition, analysis, definition, spelling, pronunciation, and combination of medical terms from prefixes, suffixes, roots, and combining forms. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. and MATH 0307. F, Sp, Su (5109090016).


MUSIC (MUSI)

MUSI 1116. (T) Sight Singing & Ear Training I.     (1-2-0)

Singing tonal music in treble and bass clefs, and aural study of elements of music, such as scales, intervals and chords, and dictation of basic rhythm, melody and diatonic harmony. First semester of four-semester sequence of sight singing-ear training component of music theory instruction. Concurrent enrollment with MUSI 1311 and MUSI 1181 is required unless waived by the department chair. F (5009045626).

 

MUSI 1117. (T)               

Sight Singing & Ear Training II.      (1-2-0)

Singing tonal music in various clefs, continued aural study of the elements of music, and dictation of intermediate rhythm, melody and diatonic harmony. Prerequisite: MUSI 1116 with a minimum of grade of "C" and concurrent enrollment with MUSI 1312 and MUSI 1182 unless waived by the department chair. Sp (5009045626).

 

MUSI 1157. (T)               

Opera Workshop.      (1-0-3)

A study of the synthesis of singing and acting through the performance of opera. Portions of or complete operas may be staged and performed, integrating music, acting, and staging. Fall semester only. Participation by audition or instructor approval only.  Participation by audition or instructor approval only. Participants must also be registered for MUEN 2141 as well as MUAP 1281, 1282, or 2281. May be repeated for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. F (5009085226).

 

MUSI 1181. (T)               

Piano Class I.        (1-1-1)

Beginning class instruction in the fundamentals of keyboard technique. First semester of four-semester sequence of keyboard theory skills and literature study.  For music majors only. Course fee $35. F, Sp (5009075126).

 

MUSI 1182. (T)               

Piano Class II.       (1-1-1)

Advanced beginning class instruction in the fundamentals of keyboard technique. Continuation of MUSI 1181.  For music majors only. Course fee $35. F, Sp. (5009075126).

 

MUSI 1183. (T)                                                 

Voice Class.        (1-0-3)                 

Class instruction in the fundamentals of singing including breathing, tone production, and diction. Solo performance participation in vocal seminars as well as the Spring Vocal Concert. Spring semester only. Spring semester only. Participation by audition or instructor approval only. Participants must also be registered for MUEN 2142 as well as MUAP 1281, 1282, or 2281. May be repeated for a maximum of two credit hours. Laboratory fee $35. Sp (5009085126).

 

MUSI 1303. (T)                

Fundamentals of Music.      (3-3-0)

Introduction to the basic elements of music theory, including scales, intervals, keys, triads, elementary ear training, notation, meter, and rhythm. Course does not apply to a music major degree but is suggested for music majors who, as indicated by placement scores, need additional background to be successful in MUSI 1311. To optimize their success, students should be concurrently enrolled in MUSI 1181 (Piano Class I) or in MUAP 1170 (Applied Piano for Non-Majors). F, Sp, Su (5009045526).

 

MUSI 1306. (T)                

Music Appreciation.        (3-3-0)

Understanding music through the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements, illustrated with audio recordings and live performances. Course does not apply to a music major degree. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (5009025126).

 

MUSI 1307. (T) 

Music Literature       (3-3-0)

A survey of the styles and forms of music as it developed from the middle ages to the present. This course will familiarize the student with cultural context, terminology, genres, and notation. For music majors only. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp. (5009025226).

 

MUSI 1311. (T)                

Music Theory I.       (3-3-0)

The study of analysis and writing of tonal melody and diatonic harmony, including fundamental music concepts, scales, intervals, chords, 7th chords, and early four-part writing. Analysis of small compositional forms. First semester of four-semester sequence of college written theory program. Concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1181 and MUSI 1116 unless waived by department chair. F (5009045126).

 

MUSI 1312. (T)                

Music Theory II.        (3-3-0)

The study of analysis and writing of tonal melody and diatonic harmony, including all diatonic chords and seventh chords in root position and inversions, non-chord tones, and functional harmony. Introduction to more complex topics, such as modulation, may occur. Prerequisite: MUSI 1311 with a minimum grate of “C” and concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1182 and MUSI 1117 unless waived by department chair. Sp (5009045126).

 

MUSI 2116. (T)                

Sight Singing & Ear Training III.       (1-2-0)

Singing more difficult tonal music in various clefs, aural study including dictation of more complex rhythm, melody, chromatic harmony, and extended tertian structures. Prerequisite: MUSI 1117 with a minimum grade of “C” and concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2311 and MUSI 2181, unless waived by department chair. F (5009045726).

 

MUSI 2117. (T)                

Sight Singing & Ear Training IV.        (1-2-0)

Singing advanced tonal music and introduction of modal and post-tonal melodies. Aural study including dictation of advanced rhythm, melody, and harmony. Prerequisite: MUSI 2116 with a minimum grade of “C” and concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2312 and MUSI 2182 unless waived by the department chair. Sp (5009045726).

 

MUSI 2181. (T)                

Piano Class III.       (1-1-1)

Intermediate class instruction of keyboard technique. Continuation of MUSI 1182. For music majors only. F (5009075126).

 

MUSI 2182. (T)                

Piano Class IV.      (1-1-1)

Advanced class instruction of keyboard technique. Continuation of MUSI 2181. For music majors only. S (5009075126).

 

MUSI 2311. (T)                

Music Theory III.       (3-3-0)

Advanced harmony voice leading, score analysis and writing of more advanced tonal harmony including chromaticism and extended-tertian structures. Continuation of MUSI 1312. Prerequisite: MUSI 1312 with a minimum grade of “C” and concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2181 and MUSI 2116 unless waived by department chair. F (5009045226).

 

MUSI 2312. (T)                  

Music Theory IV.        (3-3-0)

Continuation of advanced chromaticism and survey of analytical and compositional procedures in post-tonal music. Continuation of MUSI 2311. Prerequisite: MUSI 2311 with a minimum grade of “C” and concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2182 and MUSI 2117 unless waived by department chair. Sp (5009045226).


MUSIC-APPLIED (MUAP)

MUAP: Students seeking a Baccalaureate degree with a major or minor in Music should register for MUAP Private Applied lessons listed listed below to receive individual instruction in voice or an instrument. These lessons are designed for transferability to a senior institution as degree requirements. They also include compulsory ensemble registration, recital attendance, and Student Recital participation by each student in his/her major instrument. See the department chair for more information. Each lesson may be repeated once for credit.  Laboratory fee of $100 per half-hour instruction per week and $200 for one-hour instruction per week. F, Sp (5009035426). 

MUAP (Music Applied)

MUAP 1117. (T) 
Woodwinds      (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 1137. (T) 
Brass      (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 1157. (T) 
Percussion     (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 1161. (T) 
Guitar     (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 1165. (T) 
Organ     (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 1169. (T) 
Piano      (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 1181. (T) 
Voice       (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 1217. (T) 
Woodwinds    (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 1237. (T) 
Brass        (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 1257. (T) 
Percussion      (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 1261. (T) 
Guitar       (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 1265. (T) 
Organ      (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 1269. (T) 
Piano     (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 1281. (T) 
Voice        (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 2117. (T) 
Woodwinds     (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 2137. (T) 
Brass     (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 2157. (T) 
Percussion     (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 2161. (T) 
Guitar     (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 2165. (T) 
Organ     (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 2169. (T) 
Piano    (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 2181. (T) 
Voice    (1-0-1/2)

 

MUAP 2217. (T) 
Woodwinds     (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 2237. (T) 
Brass       (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 2257. (T) 
Percussion    (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 2261. (T) 
Guitar    (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 2265. (T) 
Organ    (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 2269. (T) 
Piano      (2-0-1)

 

MUAP 2281. (T) 
Voice      (2-0-1)


MUSIC-APPLIED ELECTIVE (NON-MAJOR)

MUAP (NM): Students who are seeking a Baccalaureate degree with Music as neither major nor minor should register for MUAP (NM) Private Applied lessons listed below to receive individual instruction in voice or an instrument.  . These lessons are designed for transferability to a senior institution as elective credits only. See department chair for more information. Laboratory fee of $100 per half-hour instruction per week and $200 for one-hour instruction per week. F, Sp (5009035426).

MUAP 1118. (T)
Woodwinds-Elective NM     (1-0-1/2)

                                                                      

MUAP 1138. (T)
Brass-Elective NM     (1-0-1/2)                                                                      

 

MUAP 1158. (T)
Percussion-Elective NM   (1-0-1/2)                                                   

                                                                      

MUAP 1162. (T)
Guitar-Elective NM     (1-0-1/2)                                                   

                                                                      

MUAP 1166. (T)
Organ-Elective NM      (1-0-1/2)                                                  

                                                                      

MUAP 1170. (T)
Piano-Elective NM      (1-0-1/2)                                                   

                                                                      

MUAP 1182. (T)
Voice-Elective NM     (1-0-1/2)                                                   

                                                                      

MUAP 1218. (T)
Woodwinds-Elective NM   (2-0-1)                                                   

 

MUAP 1238. (T)
Brass-Elective NM       (2-0-1)

                                                                                                                                            

MUAP 1258. (T)
Percussion-Elective NM     (2-0-1)

                                                                      

MUAP 1262. (T)
Guitar-Elective NM     (2-0-1)                                                   

                                                                      

MUAP 1266. (T)
Organ-Elective NM      (2-0-1)                                                   

                                                                      

MUAP 1270 (T)
Piano-Elective NM      (2-0-1)                                                   

                                                                      

MUAP 1282. (T)
Voice-Elective NM    (2-0-1)


MUSIC ENSEMBLES (MUEN)

MUEN 1131. (T)

Piano Ensemble I.    (1-0-3)

Ensemble required of all piano concentrations or majors enrolled in MUAP 1269 or MUAP 2269. Others may enroll with instructor's approval. Fall semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. F (5009035626).

 

MUEN 1132. (T)                               

Piano Ensemble II.     (1-0-3)

Ensemble required of all piano concentrations or majors enrolled in MUAP 1269 or MUAP 2269. Others may enroll with instructor's approval. Spring semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035626).

 

MUEN 1135. (T)

Percussion Ensemble I.    (1-0-2)

An instrumental ensemble composed only of percussion instruments. Fall semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Prerequisite: The instructor's approval. Course fee $35. F (5009035626).

 

MUEN 1136. (T)

Percussion Ensemble II.     (1-0-2)

An instrumental ensemble composed only of percussion instruments. Spring semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Prerequisite: The instructor's approval. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035626).

 

MUEN 1137. (T)

Chamber Ensemble I.     (1-0-3)

An instrumental ensemble composed only of orchestral instruments. Fall semester only. Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Prerequisite: The instructor's approval. Course fee $35. F (5009035626).

 

MUEN 1138. (T)

Chamber Ensemble II.     (1-0-3)

An instrumental ensemble composed only of orchestral instruments. Spring semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Prerequisite: The instructor's approval. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035726).

 

MUEN 1145. (T)

Camerata Singers I.       (1-0-3)

A women’s chamber choir. Open to music majors and non-majors. Fall semester only. This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. F (5009035826).

 

MUEN 1146. (T)                   

Camerata Singers II.    (1-0-3)

A women’s chamber choir. Open to music majors and non-majors.  Spring semester only.  This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035826).

 

MUEN 1151. (T)

KC Connection I.     (1-0-3)

Open by audition.  A highly select group of 6-8 singers who perform music written for small ensemble. Fall semester only. This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. F (5009035826).

 

MUEN 1152. (T)                   

Vokalize Ensemble II.    (1-0-3)

KC Connection II.     (1-0-3)

Open by audition.   A highly-select group of 6-8 singers who perform music written for small ensemble. Spring semester only.  This course may be repeated for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035826).

 

MUEN 2121. (T)

Marching Band.      (1-0-6)

The Kilgore College Ranger Band is the music department's premier marching instrumental performance ensemble meeting only in the fall semesters. Membership is by audition only and attendance requirements are strictly enforced for scholarship maintenance. Fall semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. F (5009035526).

 

MUEN 2122. (T)

Wind Symphony.      (1-0-6)

The Kilgore College Wind Symphony is the spring component of the music department's instrumental performance ensemble program. Membership is by audition only and attendance requirements are strictly enforced for scholarship maintenance. Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035526).

 

MUEN 2123. (T)

Guitar Ensemble I.      (1-0-2)

Open to guitar majors and by audition to non-majors. This group performs music written for multiple guitars with an emphasis on classical repertoire. Jazz and Popular styles may also be explored. Fall semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credits. Course fee $35. F (5009035626).

 

MUEN 2124. (T)

Guitar Ensemble II.     (1-0-2)

Open to guitar majors and by audition to non-majors. This group performs music written for multiple guitars with an emphasis on classical repertoire. Jazz and Popular styles may also be explored. Spring semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credits. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035526).

 

MUEN 2125. (T)

Jazz Ensemble I.       (1-0-3)

The Jazz Ensemble is open to students by audition to facilitate the instrumentation of American jazz ensembles. Fall semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. F (5009035526).

 

MUEN 2126. (T)                                

Jazz Ensemble II.       (1-0-3)

The Jazz Ensemble is open to students by audition to facilitate the instrumentation of American jazz ensembles. Spring semester only.  Students may repeat this course for a maximum of two credit hours. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035526).

 

MUEN 2141. (T)

Chorale I.        (1-0-3)

Vocal ensemble training students using choral literature representing popular, classical, and contemporary styles. Membership requires attendance at all called rehearsals and public performances. Open by a highly selective audition, this course may be repeated for a maximum of two credit hours. Fall semester only. Course fee $35. F (5009035826).

 

MUEN 2142. (T)

Chorale II      (1-0-3)

Vocal ensemble training students using choral literature representing popular, classical, and contemporary styles. Membership requires attendance at all called rehearsals and public performances. Open by a highly selective audition, this course may be repeated for a maximum of two credit hours. Spring semester only. Course fee $35. Sp (5009035726).


NURSE ASSISTANT (NURA)

NURA 1160. (NT)

Clinical - Nursing Assistant/Aide and Patient Care Assistant/Aide     (1-0-4)

Course Description: A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Prerequisite: NURA 1307 (Body Systems), Corequisite: NURA 1401 (Nurse Aide for Healthcare). Clinical Course Fee $55. F, Sp, Su (51.3902)

 

NURA 1307. (NT) 

Body Systems     (3-2-4)

A basic Study of the structures and functions of the human body. Prerequisite:  Student must complete MDCA 1313 (Medical Terminology).  Course fee $100.  F, Sp, Su (51.3902).

 

NURA 1401. (NT)

Nurse Aide for Health Care    (4-3-4)

Knowledge, skills, and abilities essential to provide basic care to residents of long-term care facilities. Topics include resident's rights, communication, safety, observation, reporting and assisting residents in maintaining basic comfort and safety. Emphasis on effective interaction with members of the health care team, restorative services, mental health, and social services needs.  Prerequisite: NURA 1307 (Body Systems), Corequisite: NURA 1160 (Clinical- Nursing Assistant/Aide and Patient Care Assistant/Aide). Course Fee $100. F, Sp, Su (51.3902)


NURSING (RNSG)

RNSG 1125. (NT)

Professional Nursing Concepts I.   (1-1-0)

Introduction to professional nursing concepts and exemplars within the professional nursing roles:  Member of Profession, Provider of Patient-Centered Care, Patient Safety Advocate, and Member of the Health Care Team.  Content includes clinical judgment, communication, ethical-legal, evidence-based practice, health promotion, informatics, patient-centered care, patient education, professionalism, safety, and teamwork/collaboration.  Emphasizes role development of the professional nurse.  This course lends itself to a concept-based approach. Prerequisite: BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402, CHEM 1406, and acceptance into the ADN program. The student must pass all Level I semester courses order to be able to progress to Level II nursing courses. (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1126. (NT)      

Professional Nursing Concepts II.      (1-1-0)

Expanding professional nursing concepts and exemplars with the professional nursing roles.  Applying concepts of clinical judgment, communications, ethical-legal, evidence-based practice, patient-centered care, professionalism, safety, teamwork and collaboration to the exemplars presented in the Health Care Concepts II course.  Introduces concept of leadership and management.  Emphasizes role development of the professional nurse.  This course lends itself to a concept-based approach.  Prerequisite: RNSG 1128, 1216, 1430, 1125 and 1161. The student must pass all Level II nursing courses in order to be able to progress to Level III nursing courses. (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1128. (NT)     

Introduction to Health Care Concepts.     (1-1-0)

An introduction to concept-based learning with emphasis on selected pathophysiological concepts with nursing applications.  Concepts include acid-base balance, fluid and electrolytes, immunity, gas exchange, perfusion, metabolism, coping, and tissue integrity. This course lends itself to a concept-based approach.  Prerequisite: BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402, CHEM 1406, and acceptance into the ADN program. The student must pass all Level I semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level II nursing courses. The transition student pre-requisites also include BIOL 2420 and PSYC 2314, and must pass all first semester transition courses in order to be able to progress to Level III nursing courses. (5138010014). 

 

RNSG 1137. (NT)      

Professional Nursing Concepts III.      (1-1-0)

Application of professional nursing concepts and exemplars within the professional nursing roles.  Utilizes concepts of clinical judgment, ethical-legal, evidence-based practice, patient-centered care, professionalism, safety, teamwork and collaboration.  Introduces the concepts of quality improvement, health information technology, and health care organizations.  Incorporates concepts into role development of the professional nurse.  This course lends itself to a concept-based approach.  Prerequisite: RNSG 1126, 1433, and 2362. The student must pass all Level III semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level IV nursing courses. (5138010014).

 

 RNSG 1161. (NT)     

 Clinical Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse I.      (1-0-4)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialize3d occupational theory, skills, and concepts.  Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional.  Prerequisite: BIOL 2401, BIOL, 2402, CHEM 1406, and acceptance into the ADN program. Co-requisite:  RNSG 1430.  The student must pass all Level I semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level II nursing courses. Clinical course fee: $75 (5138010014)

 

RNSG 1163. (NT)

Transition Clinical.   (1-0-4)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts.  Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402, BIOL 2420, PSYC 2314, CHEM 1406, and acceptance into the Transition Nursing Program. Co-requisite:  RNSG 1424. The student must pass all first semester transition courses in order to be able to progress to Level III nursing courses. Clinical course fee: $75 (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1201. (NT)      

Pharmacology.      (2-2-0)

This course is designed for health science majors. Introduction to the science of pharmacology with emphasis on the actions, interactions, adverse effects, and nursing implications of each drug classification.  Topics include the roles and responsibilities of the nurse in safe administration of medications within a legal/ethical framework.  Content includes applicable DEC competencies.  On-line software Fee $100.  Course fee $100. (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1216.  (NT)     

Professional Nursing Competencies.     (2-0-8)

Development of professional nursing competencies in the care of diverse patients throughout the lifespan.  Emphasizes psychomotor skills and clinical reasoning in the performance of nursing procedures related to the concepts of: clinical judgment, comfort, elimination, fluid and electrolytes, nutrition, gas exchange, safety functional ability, immunity, metabolism, mobility, tissue integrity, thermoregulation, communication, patient education, professionalism, and ethical & legal precepts.  Includes health assessment and medication administration.  This course lends itself to a concept-based approach.  Prerequisite: BIOL 2401, BIOL, 2402, CHEM 1406, and acceptance into the ADN program. The student must pass all Level I semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level II nursing courses. The transition student – pre-requisite also includes BIOL 2420 and PSYC 2314, and must pass all first semester transition courses in order to be able to progress to Level III nursing courses.  Course fee:  $100. (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1293. (NT)

Special Topics in Nursing.    (2-2-0)

Topics address recently identified skills, knowledge and/or behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of a student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times as needed to improve student proficiency. Content includes applicable DEC competencies. Prerequisites: Referral from current nursing instructor. Computer Software Fee $150. Testing Fee $125. (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1301. (NT)

Pharmacology.      (3-2-4)

This course is designed for health science majors. Introduction to the science of pharmacology with emphasis on the actions, interactions, adverse effects, & nursing implications of each drug classification. Topics include the roles, & responsibilities of the nurse in safe administration of medications within a legal/ethical framework.  Content includes applicable DEC competencies. On-line software Fee $100. Course fee $100. (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1424. (NT)

Concept-Based Transition to Professional Nursing Practice.     (4-3-4)

Integration of previous health care knowledge and skills into the role development of the professional nurse as a provider of patient-centered care, patient safety advocate, member of health care team, and member of the profession.  Emphasis is on clinical decision-making for patients and their families.  Review of selected health care and professional nursing concepts with application through exemplars.  Health care concepts include comfort, diversity, elimination, functional ability, human development, mobility, nutrition, sensory perception, sleep, coping, thermoregulation, tissue integrity, acid-base balance, clotting, cognition, fluid and electrolyte balance, gas exchange, immunity, metabolism, nutrition, end-of-life, grief, and perfusion.  Professional nursing concepts include clinical judgment, communication, ethical-legal, evidence-based practice, health promotion, health information technology, patient-centered education, professionalism, safety, teamwork and collaboration.  Introduces concept of leadership and management.  This course lends itself to a concept-based approach.  Prerequisite:  BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402, CHEM 1406, BIOL 2420, PSYC 2314 and acceptance into the Transition Nursing Program.  Co-requisite:  RNSG 1163. The student must pass all transition courses in order to be able to progress to Level III nursing courses. Computer Software Fee: $150; Testing Fee: $125; Simulation Fee: $75; Course fee: $100 (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1430. (NT)

Health Care Concepts I.     (4-3-4)

In-depth coverage of foundational health care concepts with application through selected exemplars.  Concepts include comfort, diversity, eliminations, functional ability, human development, mobility, nutrition, sensory perceptions, sleep, thermoregulations, end-of-life, grief, and tissue integrity.  Emphasizes development of clinical judgment skills in the beginning nurse.  This course lends itself to a concept-based approach.  Prerequisite: BIOL 2401, BIOL, 2402, CHEM 1406 and acceptance into the ADN program. Co-requisite:  RNSG. The student must pass all Level I semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level II nursing courses. Computer Software Fee: $150; Testing Fee:  $125; Simulation Fee: $75; Course fee: $100 (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1433. (NT)

Health Care Concepts II.     (4-3-4)

In-depth coverage of health care concepts with application through selected exemplars.  Concepts include acid-base balance, coping, clotting, cognition, fluid and electrolytes, gas exchange, immunity, metabolism, nutrition, comfort, and perfusion.  Provides continuing opportunities for development of clinical judgment skills.  The course lends itself to a concept-based approach. Prerequisite: RNSG 1128, 1216, 1430, 1125, and 1161. Co-requisite:  RNSG 2362. The student must pass all Level II semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level III nursing courses. Computer Software fee:  $150; Testing Fee:  $125; Simulation Fee: $75; Course fee: $100 (5138010014).

 

RNSG 1538. (NT)

Health Care Concepts III.    (5-4-4)

In-depth coverage of health care concepts with nursing application through selected exemplars.  Concepts include cellular regulation, end of life, immunity, interpersonal relationships, human development, intracranial regulation, mood/affect, comfort, sexuality, mobility, and reproduction.  Provides continuing opportunities for development of clinical judgment skills.  The course lends itself to a concept-based approach.  Prerequisite: RNSG 1126, 1433, and 2362.  Co-requisite:  RNSG 2363. The student must pass all Level III semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level IV nursing courses. Computer Software fee: $150; Testing Fee: $125; Simulation Fee: $75; Course fee: $100 (5138010014).

 

RNSG 2138. (NT)

Professional Nursing Concepts IV.       (1-1-0)

Integration of professional nursing concepts and exemplars within the professional nursing roles.  Synthesizes concepts of clinical judgment, ethical-legal, evidence-based practice, leadership and management, patient-centered care, professionalism, safety, and team/collaboration through exemplars presented in the HCC course.  Emphasizes concept of quality improvement and introduces health policy.  Incorporates concepts into role development of the professional nurse.  This course lends itself to a concept-based approach. Prerequisite: RNSG 1137, 1538, and 2363. The student must pass all Level IV semester courses in order to graduate from the nursing program.  (5138010014).

 

RNSG 2360. (NT)

Clinical Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse IV.      (3-0-12)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts.  Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional.  Prerequisite: RNSG 1538, 1137, and 2363. Co-requisite:  RNSG 2539. The student must pass all Level IV semester courses in order to be able to graduate from the nursing program.  Clinical Course Fee: $75. (5138010014).

 

RNSG 2362. (NT)

Clinical Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse II.      (3-0-12)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts.  Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional.  Prerequisite: RNSG 1128, 1216, 1430, 1125 and 1161. Co-requisite:  RNSG 1433. The student must pass all Level II semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level III nursing courses.  Clinical Course Fee: $75 (5138010014).

 

RNSG 2363. (NT)      

Clinical Registered Nursing/Registered Nurse III.      (3-0-12)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts.  Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional.  Prerequisite: RNSG 1126, 1433, and 2362. Co-requisite:  RNSG 1538. The student must pass all Level III semester courses in order to be able to progress to Level IV nursing courses.  Clinical Course Fee:  $75 (5138010014).

 

RNSG 2539. (NT)

Health Care Concepts IV.     (5-4-4)

In-depth coverage of advanced health care concepts with nursing application through selected exemplars.  Concepts include, cognition, immunity, clotting, fluid and electrolyte balance, gas exchange, metabolism, nutrition, perfusion, coping, tissue integrity, and interpersonal relationships.  Continuing development of clinical judgment with integration of all program concepts.  The course lends itself to a concept-based approach.  Prerequisite: RNSG 1538, 1137, and 2363. Co-requisite:  RNSG 2360. The student must pass all Level IV semester courses in order to graduate from the nursing program.  Computer Software fee: $150; Testing Fee: $125; Simulation Fee: $75; Course fee: $100 (5138010014).


OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH TECHNOLOGY (OSHT, EPCT)

OSHT 1301. (NT)

Introduction to Safety and Health.      (3-3-0)

An introduction to the basic concepts of safety and health. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 or ENGL 0307. (1507010011).

     

OSHT 1305. (NT)

OSHA Regulations – Construction Industry.    (3-3-0)

A study of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations pertinent to the construction industry. A student who meets all the OSHA requirements for a 30-hour construction card will receive the OSHA 30-hour certification card for the Construction Industry.  Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 or ENGL 0307. Card Fee: $8. (1507010011).

 

OSHT 1313. (NT)     

Accident Prevention, Inspection, and Investigation.     (3-3-0)

Principles and practices providing a basis for understanding the nature of occupational hazard recognition, accident prevention, loss reduction, inspection techniques, and accident investigation analysis. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 or ENGL 0307.  (1507010011).

 

OSHT 1221. (NT)

Fire Protection Systems.    (2-1-2)

Study of fire protection systems and their applications with emphasis on the National Fire Protection Association codes. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 or ENGL 0307.  (1507010011).

 

OSHT 1371. (NT)  

OSHA Regulations - General Industry.        (3-3-0)

A study of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations pertinent to the general industry. A student who meets all the OSHA requirements for a 30-hour General Industry card will receive the OSHA 30-hour certification card for the General Industry. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307, ENGL 0307. Card Fee: $8 (1507010011).

 

OSHT 2401. (NT)

OSHA Regulations – General Industry.      (4-4-0)

A study of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations pertinent to the general industry. A student who scores 70% or better on comprehensive final exam will receive the OSHA 30-hour certification card in the General Industry. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 or ENGL 0307. Fee: $8 (1507010011).

 

OSHT 1380. (NT)

Cooperative Education - Occupational Safety & Health Technology/Technician.   (3-0-21)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer and student. Under the supervise on of the college and employer, the student combines learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. (1507010011).

 

OSHT 2380. (NT)

Cooperative Education - Occupational Safety & Health Technology/Technician.       (3-0-21)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer and student. Under the supervision of the college and employer, the student combines learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisite: OSHT 1380. (1507010011).

 

OSHT 2381. (NT)

Cooperative Education - Occupational Safety & Health Technology/Technician.       (3-0-21)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer and student. Under the supervision of the college and employer, the student combines learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisite: OSHT 2380. (1507010011).

 

EPCT 1305. (NT)

Environmental Regulations Overview.           (3-3-0)

An introduction to the history of the environmental movement, including basic requirements for compliance with the environmental regulations. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 or ENGL 0307.  (1505070011).

 

EPCT 2300. (NT)

DOT Regulations.       (3-3-0)

A detailed study of the United States Department of Transportation regulations with emphasis on identifying applicable regulations recommending compliance strategies in the transport of dangerous and hazardous materials. Examination of the regulatory requirements for employees and employers involved in all modes of transportation, including road, rail, aircraft and vessel. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 or ENGL 0307.   (1505070000).

 

EPCT 2331. (NT)

Industrial Hygiene Applications.         (3-3-0)

A study of the industrial environment and its relation to worker's health. This course provides training in anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and controlling health hazards particularly chemical, physical, biological, and ergonomic factors existing in the workplace and having injurious effects on workers. The course also introduces training in instrumentation used in monitoring and measuring health hazards in the workplace and covers current issues in industrial hygiene. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 or ENGL 0307.  (1505070011).


BUSINESS COMPUTER OFFICE MANAGEMENT (POFI, POFM, POFT)

POFI 1301. (NT)                 

Computer Applications I.    (3-2-3)

Overview of computer office applications including current terminology and technology. Introduction to computer hardware, software applications, and procedures. This course is designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307.  Course fee $30. (5204070004).

 

POFI 1341. (NT)

Computer Applications II.    (3-2-3)

Continued study of current computer terminology and technology. Advanced skill development in computer hardware, software applications, and procedures. This course is designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisites:  Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. POFI 1301, Computer Applications I or equivalent. Course fee $30. (5204070004).

 

POFI 2301. (NT)                 

Word Processing.      (3-2-2)

Word processing software focusing on business applications. This course is designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and proficiency in keyboarding. Course fee $30. (5204070004).

 

POFT 1331. (NT)

Numeric Keypad Applications.     (3-3-0)

Skill development in the operation of a numeric keypad. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307 and MATH 0307. Course fee $30. (5204080000).

 

POFT 1301. (NT)               

Business English.     (3-3-0)

Introduction to a practical application of basic language usage skills with emphasis on fundamentals of writing and editing for business. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (5204010004).

 

POFT 1309. (NT)                

Administrative Office

Procedures I.       (3-3-0)

Study of current office procedures, duties, and responsibilities applicable to an office environment. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, POFT 1329, POFT 1313. Course fee $30.  WorkKeys fee $25. (5204010004).

 

POFT 1313. (NT)                

Professional Workforce

Preparation.      (3-3-0)

Preparation for career success including ethics, interpersonal relations, professional attire, and advancement. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Course fee $30. (5204010004).

 

POFT 1319. (NT)               

Records and Information

Management I.      (3-3-0)

Introduction to basic records information management systems including manual and electronic filing. Prerequisites: Completed or currently enrolled in POFI 1301 or equivalent. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. Course fee $30. (5204010004).

 

POFT 1329. (NT)

Beginning Keyboarding.    (3-2-3)

Skill development in keyboarding techniques.  Emphasis on development of acceptable speed and accuracy levels and formatting basic documents.  Prerequisites:  Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307, and ENGL 0307.  Course fee $30.  (5204080004).

 

POFT 2312. (NT)               

Business Correspondence &

Communication.         (3-3-0)

Development of writing and presentation skills to produce effective business communications. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307, completion of POFT 1301, and POFT 1329 or the equivalent. Course fee $30. (5205010004).

 

POFT 2364. (NT)                

Practicum.    (3-0-24)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college and student. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 0307. (5204010000).


PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

PHIL 1301 (T)

Introduction to Philosophy.   (3-3-0)

A study of major issues in philosophy and/or the work of major philosophical figures in philosophy. Topics in philosophy may include theories of reality, theories of knowledge, theories of value, and their practical applications. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, S, Su (3801015112).

 

PHIL 2306. (T)

Introduction to Ethics.    (3-3-0)

The systematic evaluation of classical and/or contemporary ethical theories concerning the good life, human conduct in society, morals, and standards of value. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su. (38.0101.53 12).


PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT (PTHA)

PTHA 1201. (NT)

The Profession of Physical Therapy.    (2-2-0)

Introduction to the profession of physical therapy and the role of the physical therapist assistant. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval. F (5108060016).

 

PTHA 1225. (NT)

Communication in Healthcare.    (2-2-0)

Communication theories and principle for optimal delivery of health care. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval. Course fee $115. F (5108060016)

 

PTHA 1266. (NT)

Practicum - Physical Therapist Assistant I.     (2-0-14)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. A type of health profession work-based instruction that helps students gain practical experience in the discipline, enhance skills, and integrate knowledge. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional, generally a clinical instructor. This is a full-time 5 6-week clinical experience for the first year student in either an acute or orthopedic outpatient setting. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval. Clinical Course fee $75. Course supply fee $72.  Software fee $50.  Su (5108060016).

 

PTHA 1321. (NT)

Pathophysiology for the PTA.     (3-3-0)

Study of the pathophysiology of diseases/conditions encountered in physical therapy. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval. F (5108060016).

 

PTHA 1405. (NT)

Basic Patient Care Skills      (4-2-6)

The application of basic patient handling, functional skills, communication, and selected data collection techniques. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or departmental approval. Course fee $100. F (5108060016).

 

PTHA 1413. (NT)

Functional Anatomy.      (4-3-4)

The relationship of the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems to normal and abnormal movement. Prerequisite/Corequisite: Human Anatomy and Physiology I and/or II or equivalent or departmental approval. Course fee $100. Sp (5108060016).

 

PTHA 1431. (NT)

Physical Agents.      (4-3-4)

Biophysical principles, physiological effects, efficacy, and application of physical agents. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval. Course fee $100. Course supply fee $95. F (5108060016).

 

PTHA 2160. (NT)

Clinical - Physical Therapist Assistant I.       (1-0-3)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. This is a full-time two-week clinical experience for the second year student in a specialty area associated with physical therapy. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval.  Clinical Course fee $75. Sp (5108060016).

 

PTHA 2239. (NT)

Professional Issues.      (2-2-0)

Discussion of professional issues and behaviors related to clinical practice; preparation for transition into the workforce. Serves as a capstone course. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or departmental approval. Testing fee $125  Sp (5108060016).

 

PTHA 2266. (NT)

Practicum - Physical Therapist Assistant II.    (2-0-14)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. A type of health profession work-based instruction that helps students gain practical experience in the discipline, enhance skills, and integrate knowledge. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional, generally a clinical instructor. This is a full-time 6-week clinical experience for the second year student n either an acute, orthopedic outpatient, or rehab neurological setting. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval. Clinical Course fee $75. Software fee $50. Sp (510806116).

 

PTHA 2267. (NT)

Practicum - Physical Therapist Assistant III.    (2-0-14)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. A type of health profession work-based instruction that helps students gain practical experience in the discipline, enhance skills, and integrate knowledge. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional, generally a clinical instructor. This is the final full-time 6-week clinical experience for the second year student n either an acute, orthopedic outpatient, or rehab neurological setting. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval. Clinical Course fee $75. Software fee $50. Sp (510806116).

 

PTHA 2301. (NT)      

Essentials of Data Collection.     (3-2-4)

Data collection techniques used to assist in patient/client management. Prerequisite/Corequisite: Admission to the program or department approval; Human Anatomy & Physiology I and/or II or equivalent; or departmental approval.  Course fee $100. Sp (5108060016).

 

PTHA 2305. (NT)      

Neurology.       (3-3-0)

Study of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology as it relates to neurological conditions. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval; Pathophysiology for the PTA. F (5108060016).

 

PTHA 2509. (NT)     

Therapeutic Exercise.      (5-3-6)

Concepts, principles, and application of techniques related to therapeutic exercise and functional training. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval. Course fee $100. Sp (5108060016).

 

PTHA 2531. (NT)     

Management of Neurological Disorders.       (5-3-6)

Comprehensive rehabilitation techniques of selected neurological disorders. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval; Human Anatomy & Physiology I and/or II or equivalent; or departmental approval. Course fee $100. F (5108060016).

 

PTHA 2535. (NT)     

Rehabilitation Techniques.       (5-4-4)

Comprehensive rehabilitation of selected diseases and disorders. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or department approval; Human Anatomy & Physiology I and/or II or equivalent; or departmental approval. Course fee $100. F (5108060016).


PHYSICS (PHYS)

PHYS 1303

Stars and Galaxies (lecture)    (3-3-0)

Study of stars, galaxies, and the universe outside our solar system. This course fulfills a three-hour general education requirement in natural science.  Prerequisite: Eligible for a math co-requisite course and ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Note: Student is only allowed to take one three-hour science course. The other science course must be 4 hours (lecture and lab). (4002015103)

 

PHYS 1401. (T)        

College Physics I.      (4-3-3)

Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of classical mechanics and thermodynamics, including harmonic motion, mechanical waves and sound, physical systems, Newton’s Laws of Motion, and gravitation and other fundamental forces; with emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 and MATH 1316 or MATH 2412; or permission from the department chair. Course fee $50. F (4008015303).

 

PHYS 1402. (T)       

College Physics II.      (4-3-3)

Fundamental principles of physics, using algebra and trigonometry; the principles and applications of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electrostatics, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, optics, and modern physics topics; with emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: PHYS 1301-College Physics I & PHYS 1101-College Physics I lab or PHYS 1401-College Physics I lecture and lab. Course fee $50. Sp (4008015303).

 

PHYS 1403. (T)       

Stars and Galaxies.      (4-3-3)

Study of stars, galaxies, and the universe outside our solar system. This course fulfills a general education requirement in natural science. Co-requisite: PHYS 1103-Stars and Galaxies lab. Prerequisite: Eligible for a Math co-requisite course and ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $50. F, also offered as a web-based course. (4002015103).

 

PHYS 1404. (T)       

Solar System.    (4-3-3)

Study of the sun and its solar system, including its origin.  This course fulfills a general education requirement in natural science. Co-requisite: PHYS 1104-Solar System lab; Prerequisite: Eligible for a Math co-requisite course and ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $50. Sp, also offered as a web-based course. (4002015203).

 

PHYS 1405. (T)

Elementary Physics I.       (4-3-3)

Conceptual level survey of topics in physics intended for liberal arts and other non-science majors. This course satisfies a general requirement for a laboratory science. Co-requisite: PHYS 1105-Conceptual Physics lab; Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Eligible for a Math co-requisite course and ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Course fee $50. F, Sp (4008015103).

 

PHYS 2425. (T)        

University Physics I.      (4-3-3)

Fundamental principles of physics, using calculus, for science, computer science, and engineering majors; the principles and applications of classical mechanics, including harmonic motion, physical systems and thermodynamics; and emphasis on problem solving. Prerequisite: MATH 2413 or permission from the department chair. Course fee $50. F, Su (4001015403).

 

PHYS 2426. (T)

University Physics II.     (4-3-3)

Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics. Prerequisite: MATH 2414-Calculus II; PHYS 2425-Advanced Physics I. Course fee $50. Sp, Su (4001015703).


PROCESS TECHNOLOGY (PTAC, PTRT)

PTAC 1302. (NT)               

Introduction to Process Technology.    (3-3-0)

An introduction overview of the processing industries. F, Sp (4103010000).

 

PTAC 1310. (NT)              

Process Technology I – Equipment.      (3-2-4)

Introduction to the use of common processing equipment. Prerequisite: PTAC 1302. Course fee $100. Sp, Su (4103010000).

 

PTAC 1332. (NT)              

Process Instrumentation I.    (3-2-2)

Study of the instruments and control systems used in the process industry including terminology, process variables, symbology, control loops, and basic troubleshooting. Prerequisite: PTAC 1302. Course fee $150. Sp, Su (4103010000).

 

PTAC 1408. (NT)    

Safety, Health & Environment I.   (4-4-1)

An overview of safety, health, and environmental issues in the performance of all job tasks. Course fee $150.  F, Sp, Su (4103010000).

 

PTAC 2314. (NT)               .

Principles of Quality.       (3-3-0)

Study of the background and application of quality concepts. Topics include team skills, quality tools, statistics, economics, and continuous improvement. Prerequisite: PTAC 1302. F, Sp, Su (4103010000).

 

PTAC 2336. (NT)    

Process Instrumentation II.      (3-2-4)

Continued study of the instruments and control systems used in the process industries including terminology, process variables, symbology, control loops, and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: PTAC 1332, PHYS 1405, and MATH 1314. Course fee $150. F (4103010000).

 

PTAC 2386. (NT)     

Internship ‑ Process Technology/Technician.        (3-3-6)

A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer.  (Campus Based Internship). Course fee $150. Su (4103010000).

 

PTAC 2387. (NT)     

Internship ‑ Process Technology/ Technician.       (3-0-21)
A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer.  (Outside Employment Required).  F, Sp, Su (4103010000).

 

PTAC 2420. (NT)              

Process Technology II – Systems.       (4-3-3)

A study of the various process systems including related scientific principles. Prerequisite: PTAC 1310. Course fee $150. F (4103010000).

 

PTAC 2438. (NT)              

Process Technology III – Operations.     (4-3-3)

This course emphasizes activities associated with the hands-on operation of equipment. Prerequisite: PTAC 2420. Course fee $150. Sp (4103010000).

 

PTAC 2446. (NT)              

Process Troubleshooting.     (4-3-3)

Instruction in the different types of troubleshooting techniques, procedures, and methods used to solve process problems. Prerequisite: PTAC 1332 and PTAC 2420. Course fee $150. Sp (4103010000).

 

PTRT 1317. (NT)              

Natural Gas Processing I.    (3-3-0)

An overview of natural gas processing operations. Topics include fundamentals of gas processing, the scientific principles and how they apply to the process, processing equipment, and procedures. F (1509030000).

 

PTRT 1401. (NT)    

Introduction to Petroleum Industry.     (4-4-0)

An introduction to the various aspects of petroleum industry including equipment, systems, instrumentation, operations, and the various scientific principles. Addresses a variety of petroleum technologies: exploration, drilling, production, transportation, marketing, and chemical processing industries. F (1509030000).

 

PTRT 2323. (NT)              

Natural Gas Production.      (3-3-0)

An overview of the aspects of natural gas and oil production including various aspects of hydrocarbon production, processing equipment, and gas compression/ transportation systems. Prerequisite: PTAC 2420. Sp (1509030000).

 

PTRT 2343. (NT)                          

Refining Methods.      (3-3-0)

An analysis of petroleum refining technologies from well head to gasoline pump. Sp (1509030000).


PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

PSYC 2301. (T)                

General Psychology.       (3-3-0)

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (4201015125).

 

PSYC 2306. (T)               

Human Sexuality.       (3-3-0)

This course will provide an overview of the broad field of human sexuality. Topics will be covered from various perspectives – biological, sociological, anthropological, etc., but will focus primarily on the psychological perspective. The goal is for each student to learn factual, scientifically-based information that will provoke thought and contribute to his/her own decision-making on sexual issues outside of the classroom. (Cross-listed as SOCI 2306). Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (4201015325).

 

PSYC 2314. (T)               

Lifespan Growth and Development.      (3-3-0)

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (4227035125).

 

PSYC 2315. (T)                

Psychology of Adjustment.     (3-3-0)

Study of the processes involved in adjustment of individuals to their personal and social environments. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F (4201015625).

 

PSYC 2319. (T)                

Social Psychology.      (3-3-0)

Study of individual behavior within the social environment. May include topics such as the socio-psychological process, attitude formation and change, interpersonal relations, and group processes. (Cross-listed as SOCI 2326). Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4227075125).

 

PSYC 2306/SOCI 2306. (T)

Human Sexuality.       (3-3-0)

This course will provide an overview of the broad field of human sexuality. Topics will be covered from various perspectives - biological, sociological, anthropological, etc., but will focus primarily on the psychological perspective. The goal is for each student to learn factual, scientifically-based information that will provoke thought and contribute to his/her own decision-making on sexual issues outside of the classroom. (Cross-listed as SOCI 2306) Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4227075125).


RADIOLOGIC SCIENCE (RADR)

RADR 1166. (NT)        

Practicum II – Radiologic Science – Radiographer.    (1-0-10)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student.  Prerequisite: RADR 1313, 2309, 1266. Corequisite: RADR 2217. Clinical Course fees $75. Su (5109110016).

 

RADR 1167. (NT)        

Practicum III – Radiologic Science – Radiographer.    (1-0-10)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. Prerequisite: RADR 1166, 2217. Corequisite: RADR 1202. Clinical Course fees $75. Su (5109110016).

 

RADR 1201. (NT)        

Introduction to Radiography.    (2-2-0)

An overview of the historical development of radiography, basic radiation protection, an introduction to medical terminology, ethical and legal issues for health care professionals, and an orientation to the profession and the health care system. May be taken prior to entry to the Radiologic Science program. Prerequisites: TSI complete in READ, WRIT, and eligible to enroll in MATH 0307. F (5109110016).

 

RADR 1202. (NT)        

Radiographic Image Evaluation.       (2-1-3)

Scientific process of radiographic image evaluation. Prerequisites: RADR 1166, 2217. Corequisite: RADR 1167. Course fee $100. Su (5109110016).

 

RADR 1203. (NT)        

Patient Care.       (2-1-3)

An introduction in patient assessment, infection control procedures, emergency and safety procedures, communication and patient interaction skills, and basic pharmacology. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science program. Corequisite: RADR 1411. Course fee $100. F (5109110016).

 

RADR 1266. (NT)        

Practicum I – Radiologic Science – Radiographer.     (2-0-16)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student.  Prerequisite: RADR 1411, 1201, 1203. Corequisite: RADR 1313, 2309. Clinical Course fees $75. Sp (5109110016).

 

RADR 1313. (NT)        

Principles of Radiographic Imaging I.      (3-2-3)

Radiographic image quality and the effects of exposure variables. Prerequisites: RADR 1411, 1201, 1203. Corequisites: RADR 2309, 1266. Course fee $100. Sp (5109110016).

 

RADR 1411. (NT)          

Basic Radiographic Procedures.       (4-2-6)

An introduction to radiographic positioning terminology, manipulation of equipment, positioning and alignment of the anatomic structure and equipment, and evaluation of images for demonstration of basic anatomy. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science program and BIOL 2402. Corequisite: RADR 1203. Course fee $100. F (5109110016).

 

RADR 2167. (NT)        

Practicum VI – Radiologic Science – Radiographer.    (1-0-9)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student.  Prerequisites: RADR 2205, 2233, 2367. Corequisite: RADR 2235. Clinical Course fees $75. Su (5109110016).

 

RADR 2205. (NT)        

Principles of Radiographic Imaging II.        (2-1-3)

Radiographic image quality and the effects of exposure variables, and the synthesis of all variables in image production. Prerequisites: RADR 2331, 2313, 2366. Corequisites: RADR 2233, 2367. Course fee $100. Software fee $90. Sp (5109110016).

 

RADR 2217. (NT)        

Radiographic Pathology.      (2-2-0)

Disease processes and their appearance on radiographic images. Prerequisites: RADR 1313, 2309, 1266. Corequisite: RADR 1166. Su (5109110016).

 

RADR 2233. (NT)        

Advanced Medical Imaging.     (2-1-2)

An exploration of specialized imaging modalities. Prerequisite: RADR 2331, 2313, 2366. Corequisite: RADR 2205, 2367. Course fee $100. Sp (5109110016).

 

RADR 2235. (NT)        

Radiologic Technology Seminar.      (2-1-4)

A capstone course focusing on the synthesis of professional knowledge, skills, and attitudes in preparation for professional employment and lifelong learning.  Prerequisite: RADR 2205, 2233, 2367. Corequisite: RADR 2167. Course fee $100. Su (5109110016).

 

RADR 2309. (NT)        

Radiographic Imaging Equipment.     (3-2-2)

Equipment and physics of x-ray production. Includes basic x-ray circuits. Also examines the relationship of conventional and digital equipment components to the imaging process. Prerequisite: RADR 1411, 1201, 1203. Corequisites: RADR 1313, 1266. Course fee $100. Sp (5109110016).

 

RADR 2313. (NT)        

Radiation Biology and Protection.    (3-3-0)

Effects of radiation exposure on biological systems. Includes typical medical exposure levels, methods for measuring and monitoring radiation, and methods for protecting personnel and patients from excessive exposure. Prerequisites: RADR 1167, 1202. Corequisites: RADR 2331, 2366. F (5109110016).

 

RADR 2331. (NT)        

Advanced Radiographic Procedures.      (3-2-3)

Positioning and alignment of anatomic structures and equipment, evaluation of images for demonstration of anatomy and related pathology.   Prerequisites: RADR 1167, 1202. Corequisites: RADR 2313, 2366. Course fee $100. F (5109110016).

 

RADR 2366. (NT)        

Practicum IV – Radiologic Science – Radiographer.     (3-0-24)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student.  Prerequisites: RADR 1167, 1202. Corequisites: RADR 2331, 2313. Clinical Course fees $75. F (5109110016).

 

RADR 2367. (NT)        

Practicum V – Radiologic Science – Radiographer.     (3-0-24)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student.  Prerequisites: RADR 2366, 2313, 2331. Corequisites: RADR 2205, 2233. Clinical Course fees $75. Sp (5109110016).


RADIOLOGIC SCIENCE – COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY (RADR, CTMT)

RADR 2340. (NT)   

Sectional Anatomy for Medical Imaging.    (3-3-0)

Anatomic relationships present under various sectional orientations. Pre-requisites: Graduate of a 2-year accredited medical radiography program in ionizing radiation, ARRT certification in Radiography. F (5109110000).

 

CTMT 1291. (NT)   

Special Topics in Computed Tomography Technology.   (2-1-2)

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Pre-requisites: CTMT 2332, CTMT 2264. Corequisite: CTMT 2265. Course fee $100. Su (5109110000).

 

CTMT 2332. (NT)  

Principles of Computed Tomography.        (3-3-0)

In-depth coverage of computed tomography imaging techniques. Image quality assurance and radiation protection are emphasized. Pre-requisites: RADR 2340, RADR 2336. Co-requisite: CTMT 2264. Sp (5109110000).

 

CTMT 2336. (NT)   

Computed Tomography Equipment and Methodology.    (3-3-0)

Skill development in the operation of computed tomographic equipment, focusing on routine protocols, image quality, quality assurance, and radiation protection. Pre-requisite: Graduate of a 2-year accredited medical radiography program in ionizing radiation,-ARRT certification in Radiography, and acceptance into the Computed Tomography program. F (5109110000).

 

CTMT 2264. (NT)

Practicum (or Field Experience) – Radiologic Technology/Science – Radiographer.      (2-0-16)

Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. Pre-requisites: RADR 2340, CTMT 2336. Corequisite: CTMT 2332. Clinical Course fee $75. Sp (5109110000).

 

CTMT 2265. (NT)

Practicum (or Field Experience) - Radiologic Technology/Science – Radiographer.     (2-0-14) Practical, general workplace training supported by an individualized learning plan developed by the employer, college, and student. Pre-requisites: CTMT 2332, CTMT 2264. Corequisite: CTMT 1291. Clinical Course fee $75. Su (5109110000).


READING (READ)

NCRW 0100. (NT)

Non-Course Based Integrated Reading and Writing.      (1-0-1)

Institutional Credit Only. Intensive, instructor-monitored development of critical reading, academic writing and higher order thinking skills and academic writing skills necessary for college readiness. Students enrolled in this course must also be enrolled in an appropriate follow-up Excelerate course such as ENGL 1301 or HIST 1301. Failure to pass the exam for this course will result in the student being dropped from enrollment in the college-level Excelerate course. Requires Dept. Chair approval.  F, Sp, Su (3201086012).


RELIGION (RELIG)

(Note: RELI courses are not included in the Texas Academic Course Guide Manual. Students should check their transfer institution for transferability.)


RELI 1311.   

Survey of Old Testament.       (3-3-0)

A survey of the contents of the Old Testament in relation to the history of the Hebrews and their religious outlook. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. (0000000000).

 

RELI 1312.

Survey of New Testament.      (3-3-0)

A survey of the New Testament in relation to the historical and basic Christian teachings. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. (0000000000).

 

RELI 2311.                          

Life and Teachings of Christ.      (3-3-0)

An intensive study of the life and teachings of Christ, as revealed in the Synoptic Gospels. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301.  (0000000000).

 

RELI 2312.                           

Life and Letters of Paul.     (3-3-0)

An intensive study of the Apostle Paul and his writings with reference to the gospel message as he applied it to the problems of his day. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. (0000000000).


SOCIAL WORK (SOCW)

SOCW 2361. (T)      

Introduction to Social Work.     (3-3-0)

Development of the philosophy and practice of social work in the United States, survey of the fields and techniques of social work. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (4407015124).

 

SOCW 2362. (T)      (3-3-0)

Social Welfare as a Social Institution

Introduction to the study of modern social work, the underlying philosophy and ethics of social work, and the major divisions and types of social work together with their methods and objectives.  Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4407015224).


SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)

SOCI 1301. (T)

Introductory Sociology.       (3-3-0)

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race/ethnicity, and deviance. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (4511015125).

 

SOCI 1306. (T)

Social Problems.       (3-3-0)

Application of sociological principles and theoretical perspectives to major social problems in contemporary society such as inequality, crime and violence, substance abuse, environmental issues, deviance, or family problems. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4511015225).

 

SOCI 2301. (T)                     

Marriage and the Family.      (3-3-0)

Sociological and theoretical analysis of the structures and functions of the family, the varied cultural patterns of the American family, and the relationships that exist among the individuals within the family, as well as the relationships that exist between the family and other institutions in society. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. Sp (4511015425).

 

SOCI 2306. (T)                    

Human Sexuality.      (3-3-0)

This course will provide an overview of the broad field of human sexuality. Topics will be covered from various perspectives - biological, sociological, anthropological, etc., but will focus primarily on the psychological perspective. The goal is for each student to learn factual, scientifically-based information that will provoke thought and contribute to his/her own decision-making on sexual issues outside of the classroom. (Cross-listed as PSYC 2306). Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (4201015325).


SPANISH (SPAN)

SPAN 1411.  (T)    

Beginning Spanish I       (4-4-0)

Basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students will acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the beginner level.  F, Sp. (1609055113).

 

SPAN 1412.  (T)    

Beginning Spanish I       (4-4-0)

Continued development of basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the high beginner to low intermediate level. Prerequisite:  SPAN 1411 with C or better or with departmental approval (CLEP).  F, Sp. (1609055113).


SPEECH (SPCH)

SPCH 1315. (T)

Public Speaking.       (3-3-0)

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students' speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp, Su (23.1304.53 12).

 

SPCH 1318. (T)         

Interpersonal Communication.    (3-3-0)

Application of communication theory to interpersonal relationship development, maintenance, and termination in relationship contexts including friendships, romantic partners, families, and relationships with co-workers and supervisors. Prerequisite: TSI complete in READ and WRIT, or concurrently enrolled in ENGL 0201 and ENGL 1301. F, Sp (23.1304.54 12).


TEXAS EARLY CHILDHOOD ARTICULATION (TECA) - See Child Development/Early Childhood Professions (CDED) 


THEATRE - See Drama


VOCATIONAL NURSING (VNSG)

*May be taken prior to acceptance into program.

VNSG 1115. (NT)                 

Disease Control & Prevention.    (1-1-0)

Study of the general principles of prevention of illness and disease, basic microbiology, and the maintenance of aseptic conditions. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1163. (NT)                   

Clinical-Practical Nurse - Advanced.      (1-0-5)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts.  Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional.  Concurrent with Medical Surgical II. Course fee $25. Corequisite: VNSG 1429. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1204. (NT)                   

Foundations of Nursing.     (2-2-0)

Introduction to the nursing profession including history, standards of practice, legal and ethical issues, and role of the vocational nurse. Topics include mental health, therapeutic communication, cultural and spiritual diversity, nursing process, and holistic awareness. Test Package Fee $100.  (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1216. (NT)                

*Nutrition.       (2-2-0)

Introduction to nutrients and the role of diet therapy in growth and development and in the maintenance of health. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1219. (NT)                 

Leadership and Professional Development.      (2-2-0)

Study of the importance of professional growth. Topics include the role of the licensed vocational nurse in the multi-disciplinary health care team, professional organizations, Board of Nursing, Nurse Practice Act, Ethics, and continuing education. Test Package Fee $100. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1226. (NT)                 

Gerontology.       (2-2-0)

Overview of the physical, psychosocial, and cultural aspects of the aging process. Addresses disease processes of aging. Exploration of perceptions toward care of the older adult. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1227. (NT)                 

Essentials of Medication Administration.     (2-1-4)

General principles of medication administration including determination of dosage, preparation, safe administration, and documentation of multiple forms of drugs. Instruction includes various systems of measurement. Course fee $25.  Prerequisite or Corequisite: VNSG 1260. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1230. (NT)                 

Maternal Neonatal Nursing.      (2-2-0)

A study of the biological, psychological, and sociological concepts applicable to basic needs of the family including childbearing and neonatal care. Utilizations of the nursing process in the assessment and management of the childbearing family. Topics include physiological changes related to pregnancy, fetal development, and nursing care of the family during labor and delivery and the puerperium. Corequisite: VNSG 1361. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1238. (NT)                

Mental Illness.       (2-2-0)

Study of human behavior with emphasis on emotional and mental abnormalities and modes of treatment incorporating the nursing process. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1260.  (NT)              

Clinical-Practical Nurse—Introductory.      (2-0-10)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts.  Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional.  Concurrent with Applied Nursing Skills I. Corequisite: VNSG 1227, VNSG 1331, VNSG 1502. Course fee $25, FISDAP Fee $15, Drug Test Fee $15. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1331.  (NT)              

Pharmacology.      (3-3-0)

Fundamentals of medications and their diagnostic, therapeutic, and curative effects. Includes nursing interventions utilizing the nursing process. Corequisite or prerequisite VNSG 1420. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1334.  (NT)              

Pediatric Nursing.      (3-3-0)

Study of the care of the pediatric patient and family during health and disease. Emphasis on growth and development needs utilizing the nursing process.  Corequisite: VNSG 1361.   Test Package Fee:  $100.  (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1361.  (NT)          

Clinical-Practical Nurse - Intermediate (Summer).      (3-0-15)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision by the clinical professional. Corequisite: VNSG 1230 & VNSG 1334. Course fee $25. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1362.  (NT)          

Clinical-Practical Nurse - Intermediate.      (3-0-15)

A health-related work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. Direct supervision is provided by the clinical professional. Corequisite: VNSG 1429. Course fee $25. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1420.   (NT)        

*Anatomy and Physiology for Allied Health.     (4-4-0)

Study of the structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) of the human body, including the neuroendocrine, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, urinary, reproductive, respiratory, and circulatory systems. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1429.   (NT)             

Medical - Surgical Nursing I.     (4-4-0)

Application of the nursing process to the care of the adult patient experiencing medical surgical conditions along the health-illness continuum in a variety of health care settings. Corequisite: VNSG 1362. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1432.  (NT)             

Medical Surgical Nursing II.     (4-4-0)

Continuation of Medical-Surgical Nursing I with application of the nursing process to the care of the adult patient experiencing medical-surgical conditions along the health-illness continuum in a variety of health care settings. Corequisite: VNSG 1361. (5139010018).

 

VNSG 1502.  (NT)             

Applied Nursing Skills I.     (5-3-6)

Introduction to and application of primary nursing skills. Emphasis on utilization of the nursing process and related scientific principles. Corequisite: VNSG 1260. Course fee $35. Course fee $25. (5139010018).


WELDING (WLDG)

WLDG 1313. (NT)             

Introduction to Blueprint Reading for Welders.      (3-3-0)

A study of industrial blueprints. Emphasis placed on terminology, symbols, graphic description, and welding processes. Includes systems of measurement and industry standards. Also includes interpretation of plans and drawings used by industry to facilitate field application and production. Prerequisite: Bennett Mechanical Aptitude Testing score of 42 or above and eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 and ENGL 0307. F, Sp (4805080000).

 

WLDG 1337. (NT)             

Introduction to Welding Metallurgy.       (3-3-0)

A study of metals from the ore to the finished product. Emphasis on metal alloys, heat treating, hard surfacing, welding techniques, forging, foundry processes, and mechanical properties of metal including hardness, machinability, and ductility. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 and ENGL 0307.. F, Sp (4805080000).

 

WLDG 1421. (NT)             

Welding Fundamentals.      (4-3-3)

An introduction to the fundamentals of equipment used in oxy-fuel and arc welding, including welding and cutting safety, basic oxy-fuel welding and cutting, basic arc welding processes and basic metallurgy. Prerequisite: Bennett Mechanical Aptitude Test score of 42 or above and eligible to enroll in MATH 0307 and ENGL 0307. Course fee $200. F, Sp (4805080000).

 

WLDG 1428. (NT)     

Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW).      (4-3-3)

An introduction to the shielded metal arc welding process. Emphasis placed on power sources, electrode selection, and various joint designs. Prerequisite or Co-requisite:  WLDG 1313, WLDG 1421. Course fee $200. F, Sp (4805080002).

 

WLDG 1435. (NT)     

Introduction to Pipe Welding.      (4-3-3)

An introduction to welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding process (SMAW), including electrode selection, equipment setup, and safe shop practices. Emphasis on various welding positions and electrodes. Prerequisite or Co-requisite:  WLDG 1313, WLDG 1421. Course fee $200. F, Sp (4805080002).

 

WLDG 1457. (NT)     

Intermediate Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW).      (4-3-3)

A study of the production of various fillets and groove welds. Preparation of specimens for testing in various positions. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: WLDG 1428. Course fee $200. F, Sp (4805080002).

 

WLDG 1491. (NT)     

Special Topics in Welder/Welding Technologist.      (4-3-3)

Topics address recently identified current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behaviors pertinent to the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student. This course was designed to be repeated multiple times to improve student proficiency. Prerequisite: WLDG 2443. Course fee $200. F, Sp, Su (4805080002).

 

WLDG 2355. (NT)    

Advanced Metallurgy.      (3-3-0)

Advanced study of metallurgy as it applies to fabrication processes. Includes structure, identification, and testing of metals. Also covers temperature changes and their effect on metals, properties of metals, and factors affecting fabrication of various metals. Prerequisite: WLDG 1337. F, Sp (4805080000).

 

WLDG 2406. (NT)    

Intermediate Pipe Welding.    (4-3-3)

A comprehensive course on the welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and/or other processes. Welds will be done using various positions. Topics covered include electrode selection, equipment setup, and safe shop practices. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: WLDG 1435. Course fee $200. F, Sp (4805080000).

 

WLDG 2413. (NT)    

Intermediate Welding Using Multiple Processes.       (4-3-3)

Instruction using layout tools and blueprint reading with demonstration and guided practices with some of the following welding processes: oxy-fuel gas cutting and welding, shield metal arc welding (SMAW), gas metal arc welding (GMAW), flux-cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), or any other approved welding process.  Prerequisite or Co-requisite:  WLDG 1457.  Course fee $200.  F, Sp (4805080000).

 

WLDG 2432. (NT)    

Welding Automation.      (4-3-3)

Overview of automated welding and cutting applications. Special emphasis on safe use and operation of equipment. Prerequisite: WLDG 1428 and WLDG 1430. Course fee $150. F, Sp (4805080000).

 

WLDG 2443. (NT)    

Advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW).      (4-3-3)

Advanced topics based on accepted welding codes. Training provided with various electrodes in shielded metal arc welding processes with open V-groove joints in all positions. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: WLDG 1457. Course fee $200. F, Sp (4805080000).

 

WLDG 2451. (NT)    

Advanced Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW).     (4-3-3)

Advanced topics in GTAW welding, including welding in various positions and directions. Prerequisite: WLDG 1435. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: WLDG 1434. Course fee $200. F, Sp, (4805080000).

 

WLDG 2453. (NT)    

Advanced Pipe Welding.      (4-3-3)

Advanced topics involving welding of pipe using the shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process. Topics include electrode selection, equipment setup, and safe shop practices. Emphasis on weld positions 5G and 6G using

various electrodes. Prerequisite or Co-requisites: WLDG 1435 and WLDG 2406. Course fee $200. F, Sp, (4805080000).

 

WLDG 2480. (NT)    

Cooperative Education – Welding Technology/Welder.      (3-0-21)

Career-related activities encountered in the student's area of specialization offered through an individualized agreement among the college, employer, and student. Under the supervision of the college and the employer, the student combines classroom learning with work experience. Includes a lecture component. Prerequisite: WLDG 2443. F, Sp, Su I (4805080000).

 

TECM 1303. (NT)    

Technical Calculations.       (3-3-0)

Specific mathematical calculations required by business, industry, and health occupations. Solve technical math problems using addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division; convert between whole numbers, fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals; perform calculations involving percent, ratios, and proportions; and convert numbers to different units of measurement (standard and/or metric).F, Sp, (2703010000).

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PERSONNEL DIRECTORY

ADMINISTRATION

  • Brenda S. Kays. President. BA, MEd, Midwestern State University; EdD, University of North Texas
  • Julie H. Fowler. Executive Dean. Kilgore College-Longview, Business and Computer Science. BA, Baylor University; MS, University of Texas at Tyler; EdD, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Fred Gore. Vice President of Administrative Services and Chief Financial Officer. BBA, University of Texas at Austin; MDiv, Assemblies of God Theological Seminary; MBA, Missouri State University
  • A. Leah Gorman. Director of Alumni, Scholarship and Foundation Relations. BA, University of Oklahoma; MBA, LeTourneau University
  • Michael W. Jenkins. Vice President of Student Development and Chief Student Affairs Officer. BBA, Baylor University; MBA, University of Texas at Tyler; DBA, Northcentral University
  • Tony D. Johnson. Director of Human Resources. AS, Kilgore College; BBA Stephen F. Austin University
  • Nancy C. Law. Assistant to the President. University of New Mexico; Baptist Bible College
  • Staci J. Martin. Vice President of Institutional Planning. BS, Texas A&M University; MS, Texas A&M University at Texarkana; EdD, Texas Tech University
  • Michael H. Turpin. Vice President of Instruction and Chief Academic Officer. BS, Lamar University; MMEd, University of South Carolina; TxSBOE Professional Counselor Certification; PhD, Texas A&M University

SUPERVISORY STAFF

  • Ebony S. Allison-Dennis. Director. Instructional Student Support. BBA, MA, LeTourneau University
  • Melonie Y. Bonner. Manager. Testing Center. AA, Kilgore College; BS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Reggie L. Brazzle. Director. Financial Aid. BS, MEd, Texas A&M University
  • Raymond H. Caldwell. Director. Texas Shakespeare Festival. BA, Ouachita University; MA, University of North Texas
  • Heath A. Cariker. Police Chief. Director of Public Safety. BA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MPA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Dennis E. Cliborn. Assistant Director. TRIO Program. AA, Tyler Junior College; BS, University of Texas at Tyler; MA, Sam Houston State University
  • John T. Colville, Jr. Director. Information Technology. BS, Stephen F. Austin University; MBA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Jude W. Dubois. Director. Upward Bound Program. AA, Kilgore College; BS, University of Texas at Tyler; MS, Texas A&M University at Texarkana
  • Kathy L. Fair. Director. Watson Library. BA, Harding University; MLS, University of Alabama
  • Michael W. Ford. Supervisor. Printing Services. AA, Kilgore College; BS, Sam Houston State University
  • Pamela R. Gatton. Director. Counseling and Testing. AA, Central Christian College, BA; Mid-America Nazarene College; MEd, Wichita State University; Licensed Professional Counselor
  • Latasha F. Goodwyn. Director. Adult Education & Literacy. BA, Colorado State University; MS, University of Tennessee at Martin
  • Chris Gore. Director. Registrar and Admissions. AS, Navarro College; BA, MA, Sam Houston State University
  • Milton M. (Trey) Hattaway, III. Director. Enrollment Management and Marketing. BA, MS, Texas Tech University
  • Merlyn S. Holmes. Director. East Texas Oil Museum. AAA, Kilgore College; BS, LeTourneau University
  • Rebekah L. Johnson. Instructional Division Dean. Arts and Mathematical Sciences. AA, Kilgore College; BA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Ashley L. Mason. Coordinator. Residential Life. AA, AS, Kilgore College;
  • Colby Blake McCrary. Manager. Fitness Center. Kilgore College
  • Tammie G. Pascoe. Purchasing Agent. Northeast Texas Community College
  • Jimmy A. Rieves. Director. Student Development and Athletics. BS, MS, University of Mississippi
  • D'Wayne Shaw. Instructional Division Dean. Public Services and Industrial Technologies. AS, Universal Technical Institute; AAS, Kilgore College; BAAS, MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Delinda L. Spencer. Manager. Accounts Receivable. BA, University of Texas at Arlington, MBA, Western Governors University
  • Jonnie Stice. Controller. Business Office. BBA, West Texas State University
  • William A. Stowe. Activity Director. Distance Learning Specialist. AS, Kilgore College; BS, MS, Stephen F. Austin State University; PhD, University of North Texas
  • Corrie F. Thibodeaux. Manager. Bookstore. Certificate, Control Data Institute; AA, College of Central Florida
  • Belinda S. Tice. Director. TRIO Program. BA, Centenary College; MA, Louisiana Tech University
  • Louise A. Wiley. Instructional Division Dean. Science and Health Sciences. AAS, Kilgore College; BS, LeTourneau University; MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Dawn M. Wilson. Manager. Testing Center-Longview. BS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Martha G. Woodruff. Director. Workforce Development. AFA, Kilgore College; BBA, MBA, University of Texas at Tyler

PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT STAFF

  • Rhonda L. Ainsworth-Ellington. Media, Distance Learning and Computer Technician. AA, AAS, Kilgore College
  • Jennie I. Alcantar. Assistant Director- Corporate Services. Workforce Development. BBA, McMurry University; MS, Troy University;
  • Julie Allee. Specialist.Workforce Development. BS, MEd, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Manuel Almanza. Coordinator. Marketing Operations and Outreach. BA, University of Texas at El Paso
  • Elease Biondo. Assistant Controller. AA, AAS, Kilgore College; BBA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Susan R. Black. Public Services Librarian. Watson Library. BS, Wichita State University; MS, University of North Texas
  • Callie R. Blakeley. Admissions Counselor. AA, Kilgore College; BS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Roland G. Blasini. Director. Title III Project. BS, Pontificial Catholic University; MBA, MA, Sul Ross State University;
  • Monica R. Brock. Clinical Coordinator. Emergency Medical Technology Program. AS, Northeast Texas Community College
  • Larry Brooks. Report Writer. Information Technology. BS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Patrick J. Brophy. Specialist. Institutional Research. BS, Texas A&M
  • Chris N. Carroll. Systems Administrator. Information Technology. AAS, Tyler Junior College;
  • Wade Cates. Admissions Counselor. BS, East Texas Baptist University; MS, Texas A&M University- Texarkana
  • Chris Craddock. Coordinator. Public and Sports Information. Marketing. AA, Kilgore College; BA, University of Texas at Tyler; MEd, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Hollyann Davis. Counselor. Special Populations Disability. BS, Sam Houston State University; MA Prairie View A&M University
  • Pamela L. Davis. Assistant Registrar. BS, Howard Payne University
  • Jennifer Deupree. Project Coordinator/Coach. Early Childhood. BS, Texas Tech University; MS, Texas Women’s University
  • Melissa D. Dobbs. Counselor. KC-Longview. BA, MS, University of Texas at Tyler; Psychological Associate, Licensed Specialist in School Psychology
  • John C. Dodd. Company Manager. Texas Shakespeare Festival. BA, University of Houston at Clear Lake
  • Halen N. Dorsey. Project Advisor. Upward. Bound. BS, East Texas Baptist University
  • Jacob A. Dubois. Lab Manager. Kilgore College- Longview. AS, Kilgore College; BS, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Heidi J. Everett. Learning Specialist. TRIO Program. AA, Kilgore College; BA, LeTourneau University
  • Rechel O. Fatunde. Technician. eLearning. BS, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; MS, DePaul University
  • J. Taylor Fleet. Systems Support Specialist. Information Technology. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Christopher C. Godfrey. Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach. BS, St. John’s University; MA, Armstrong State University
  • Robert L. Horn. Specialist. Workforce Development. BBA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MBA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Chris W. Jones. Systems Administrator, Domain/Server Support. Information Technology. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Monika A. Kajstura. Teacher. Adult Education & Literacy. AA, Cultural Institute of Katowice, Poland; BA, National College of Adult Education
  • Bradley W. Keiser. Database Administrator. Information Technology. BA, Columbia College
  • Jackie Kelley. Assistant Director. Financial Aid. AA, Kilgore College; BAAS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Alexander D. Knox. Advisor. Arts and Mathematical Sciences. BA, Silver Lake College of the Holy Family
  • Ronda R. Lee. Student Success Learning Specialist. AA, Business Administration; BBA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Jane L. Lewis. Analyst. Institutional Research. BBA, Texas A&M University
  • Melanie A. Magness. Coordinator. Technical Services. Watson Library. BS, Stephen F. Austin State University; BS, University of Texas Medical Branch
  • Jamie C. Maldonado. Graphics Designer and Campus Photographer. Marketing. AA, Kilgore College; BA, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Katie A. Manrriquez. Lab manager. BS, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • William Massey. Advisor. KC-Longview.  AA, Kilgore College; BAAS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Tony C. Means. Lieutenant. Campus Police. Certificate, East Texas Police Academy, Kilgore College
  • Jeanette M. Miller. Advisor. Academic. BS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Jerry Morris. System Support Specialist. Information Technology
  • Tashauna L. Morris. Coordinator. Bone Learning Center Computer Lab. Watson Library. AAS, Texas State Technical College; BBA, East Texas Baptist University
  • Frank B. Mosley. Specialist. Workforce Development. BAAS, Stephen F. Austin State University; MS, Texas A&M- Texarkana
  • Laura L. Mulanax. Advisor. Health Science. AA, Kilgore College; BA, Ashford University
  • Lashiqua T. Patton. Staff/Grant Accountant. Business Office. BBA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MBA, Texas A&M University- Texarkana
  • Fred M. Peters. Grant Writer. Institutional Planning. BS, John Brown University; MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Jennifer A. Quine. Counselor. BA, Northeast Louisiana University; ME, University of Louisiana, Monroe; Licensed Professional Counselor
  • Uriel Ramirez. Systems Administrator, Domain/Server Support. Information Technology. BS, University of Texas- Pan American, MEN, Texas Tech University
  • Patricia A. Robinson. Assistant Women’s Softball Coach. AA, Alvin Community College; BA, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Elizabeth Rodriguez. Assistant Coordinator. Adult Education and Literacy. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Vicki D. Sexton. Teacher. Adult Education & Literacy. BS, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Sandra G. Ruddell. Coordinator. Student Accounts. Business Office. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Matthew R. Simpson. Artistic Assistant. Texas Shakespeare Festival. Certificate, American Musical & Dramatic Academy; MFA, University of Delaware
  • Meaghan Simpson. Artistic Assistant. Texas Shakespeare Festival. BFA, University of Illinois; MFA, University of Delaware
  • Mary K. Stephens. Assistant Coordinator. Instructional Student Support. AA, Tyler Junior College; AA, Kilgore College
  • Sandy K. Teel. Assistant Coordinator. Special Populations. Certificate, Commercial College
  • Charmyn A. Tumey. Teacher. Adult Education & Literacy. BS, Texas Women’s University; MBA, LeTourneau University
  • Karen Tutt. Project Coach. Early Childhood. AA, North East Texas Community College; BSIS, MEd, University of Texas at Tyler;
  • Susan Waite. Project Coach. Early Childhood. BA, University of Arizona
  • David G. Whitfield. Systems Administrator- Unified Communications Support. Information Technology. BS, Texas A&M University; MA, Dallas Theological Seminary
  • Jeff S. Williams. Environmental Safety, Construction and Facilities Manager. BS, MBA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Matthew T. Wilson. Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach. BBA, American University; MBA, Rice University; MEd, Baylor University
  • Susan C. Wilson. Public Services Librarian. Watson Library. BA, Oklahoma Baptist University; MA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MS, University of North Texas

FACULTY

  • Tracy L. Atkins. Instructor. Process Technology. AAS, Kilgore College; BBA, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Angela E. Aulds. Instructor. Dance. AA, Kilgore College; BFA, University of Texas at Austin
  • Dawn Bahr. Instructor. Associate Degree Nursing. BSN, Texas Tech University; MSN, Drexel University
  • David M. Belanger. Instructor. Culinary Arts. AAS, The Art Institute of Dallas
  • Jonathan D. Belew. Instructor. Chemistry. BS, University of Texas at Dallas; MS, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Brandon J. Belken. Instructor. Automotive Technology. Certificate, AAS, Kilgore College
  • Edward H. Bernaldez. Chair and Instructor. Emergency Medical Technology. EMT-Paramedic; AAS, Kilgore College; BAAS, MS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Joshua L. Bernethy. Instructor. Welding Technology. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Dana L. Blair. Director of Rangerettes and Instructor. Kinesiology. BS, University of Texas at Austin; MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Julie M. Blundell, Instructor. Associate Degree Nursing. AS, Kilgore College; BSN, MSN University of Texas at Tyler; BS, Computer Science at University of Texas at Tyler
  • Sarah S. Booker. Instructor. Math. BA, Abilene Christian University; MS, Texas Woman's University
  • Christopher D. Brandt. Instructor. Mathematics. BS, MS, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Wesley Brasher. Instructor. Cosmetology. Certified Cosmetology Instructor, SOL Academy
  • Krystal Bridwell. Instructor. Associate Degree Nursing. AAS, Northeast Texas Community College; BSN, MSN, University of Texas at Arlington
  • Timothy E. Bright. Instructor. Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology. AAS, Community College of the Air Force
  • Lynda J. Brooks. Instructor. English. BS, MEd, Mississippi College
  • Bennie J. Brown. Instructor. English. AA, Kilgore College; BA, MA, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Paul C. Buchanan. Instructor. Geology. BS, University of Texas; MS, Colorado School of Mines; MS, PhD, University of Houston
  • Bonnie Burgess. Instructor. Corrosion. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Sheri D. Burlingame. Instructor. Office Professional. AA, Kilgore College; BBA, University of North Texas
  • Jody L. Bush. Instructor. Industrial Maintenance. Certificate, Texas State Technical College;
  • Zachary A. Carnes. Instructor. Government. BS, MA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Joseph P. Cassin. Director. East Texas Police Academy and Instructor, Criminal Justice. BA, Virginia Military Institute; MCJ, Boston University; Master Peace Officer Certificate, Instructor Certificate, and Firearms Instructor Certificate, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement
  • Charles Childers. Instructor. Diesel Technology. MBA, Tulane University
  • Amy J. Collins. Instructor. Vocational Nursing. AAS, Walters State Technical And Community College; BSN, MBA, King University
  • Richard L. Crutcher. Chair and Instructor. Accounting. AS, Kilgore College; BS, Texas A&M University; MBA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Dane Deen. Instructor. Corrosion. AAS, Kilgore College; AAS, Texas State Technical College
  • Michele L. Daniels. Instructor. Speech. AA, College of the Sequoias, Visalia, California; BS, University of Texas at Tyler; MA, Texas State University
  • Dayna M. Davidson. Director. Associate Degree Nursing. AS, Kilgore College; BSN, Baylor University; MSN, Texas Woman's University
  • Martha H. Deen. Instructor. Psychology. BS, Texas A&M University; MEd, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Ginger A. Dennis. Instructor. Computer Science. BA, Rice University; MS, University of Texas at Tyler; EdD, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Karen Y. Dilday. Instructor. Drafting. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Nick D. Dobler. Instructor and Assistant Football Coach. Kinesiology. AS, Independence Community College; BS, Northeastern State University; MS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Candice J. Dotson. Instructor. Vocational Nursing. BSN, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Richard H. Dugger. Instructor. Accounting. BBA, Baylor University; MBA, University of Houston
  • Karen B. Dulweber. Instructor. Developmental English. BS, Texas A&M University; MEd, University of Texas
  • Ursula A. Dyer. Program Director and Instructor. Radiologic Technology. BS, Northeast Louisiana University; MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Justin J. Eckert. Instructor and Head Football Coach. Kinesiology. BA, MA, Northeastern State University
  • Cody L. Edwards. Instructor. Welding Technology. AAS, Angelina College; BAAS, Stephen F. Austin State University; MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Catherine M. Elueze. Instructor. Chemistry. BA, Knox College; Phd, Purdue University
  • Mike Fennell. Instructor. Fire Academy. Kilgore College; TCFP; Firefighter Master
  • Michael V. Ferguson. Chair, Public Services Department and Lead Instructor, Criminal Justice. AAS, Kilgore College; BA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MS, Sam Houston State University; Master Peace Officer Certificate, Advanced Instructor Certificate, and Firearms Instructor Certificate, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement
  • Heather Fitch. Instructor. English. BA, MA, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • David W. Fonteno. Instructor. Psychology. BA, MA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MA, PsyD, Argosy University;
  • Glenda F. Ford. Instructor. Cosmetology. Certificate, Kilgore College; AA, University of North Texas
  • Carolyn Fox-Hearne. Instructor. Art. BA, Southern Methodist University; MA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Ann Gerrity. Instructor. Speech. BA, MA University of North Texas
  • Micah J. Goodding. Instructor. Theatre. BA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MFA, East 15 Acting School: University of Essex
  • Willie R. Gooden, Jr. Instructor and Assistant Football Coach. Kinesiology. BGS, MS, Northeastern State University
  • Jason L. Graves. Chair and Instructor. English. AA, Kilgore College; BS, Texas A&M University; MA, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Michaelle Green. Chair and Instructor. Vocational Nursing. Certificate, St. Francis Medical Center- School of Professional Nursing
  • Dewey L. Greer. Instructor. Process Technology. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Kevin (Kay) Hawthorne. Instructor. Vocational Nursing. ADN, Kilgore College; BSN, Clayton College and State University
  • Mary G. Heiden. Chair and Instructor. Music. BMus, Lawrence University Conservatory; MA, Stephen F. Austin State University; PhD, University of North Texas
  • Jackie P. Hobbs, Instructor. Associate Degree Nursing. BSN, Texas Christian University; MSN, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Brian J. Hoberecht. Instructor and Head Men's Basketball Coach. Kinesiology. BS, Southwest College; MS, Emporia State University
  • Ronda S. Howe. Lead Instructor. Chemistry. AS, Kilgore College; BSE, East Texas State University; MS, University of Texas at Arlington
  • Jennifer Hudnall. Instructor. Biology. BA, Louisiana Tech University; MA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Derek Hunter. Instructor. History. BA, MA, Sam Houston State University
  • Elena S. Ignatchenko. Instructor. Chemistry. BS, MS, Moscow State University
  • Kathryn C. Jackson. Instructor. Culinary Arts. BS, Texas Tech University
  • Lillian J. Jackson. Program Director and Instructor. Cosmetology. Certificate, Kilgore College
  • Jesse A. James. Instructor. Biology. BS, MS, University of Texas at Tyler; MA, Sam Houston State University
  • Travis D. Jaquess. Instructor. History. BA,MA, Texas Tech University
  • Courtney A. Jenkins. Athletic Trainer and Instructor. Athletic Training. BS, East Texas Baptist University; MSS, United States Sports Academy
  • Brian C. Johnson. Instructor. History. AA, Kilgore College; BA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MA, University of Texas at Tyler;
  • Connie J. Johnson. Instructor. English. BS, MS, Northwestern State University of Louisiana
  • Karen N. Johnson. Instructor. Reading. BS, East Texas Baptist University; MEd, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Tanton L. Johnson. Instructor. Automotive Technology. AAS, Kilgore College; BS, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Jonathan K. Kaan. Instructor. Music. BM, East Texas Baptist University; MM, Baylor University
  • S. Kelly Kaemmerling. Chair and Instructor. Industrial Maintenance Technology. AS, Angelina College; BS, MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Mary K. Kates. Instructor. Math Lab. AS, Kilgore College; BS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Joseph F. Kirchhoff. Instructor. Physics. BS, Northwest Missouri State University; MS, PhD, University of Missouri-Rolla
  • Lawrence C. Kitchen. Program Director and Instructor. Visual Arts. BFA, Sam Houston State University; MA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Kristi N. Kleinig. Instructor. Physical Therapist Assistant. AAS, Kilgore College; BS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Michael C. Kusheba. Instructor. Computer Science. BS, University of Richmond; BA, Ambassador College; MS, Texas A&M University- Commerce. Certified Data Processor and Certified Computing Professional
  • Gus P. Lafosse. Instructor. Developmental English. BA, MA, McNeese State University
  • Nancy I. Lamouroux. Instructor. Radiologic Technology. AAS, Kilgore College, BS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Stephanie C. Laszik. Instructor. English. BA, MA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Joel W. Laws. Instructor. Auto Body Repair Technology. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Joseph Preston Lewis. Instructor. History. BS, BA, MA, University of North Carolina
  • Coy A. Lothrop. Instructor. Advertising/Graphic Design. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Starla D. Lumpkin. Lab Instructor. Associate Degree Nursing. Nursing Diploma, Methodist Hospital School of Nursing (Lubbock, TX); BSN, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
  • Christina R. Luther. Instructor. ESOL. BS, New Hope Christian College; MA, Southwestern Assemblies of God University
  • Zachary K. Marshall. Director of Chorale and Instructor. Music. BM, East Texas State University; MM, University of Tennessee- Knoxville; DMA, University of South Carolina
  • Margaret A. Martin. Instructor. East Texas Police Academy. AA, BS, MEd, American InterContinental University; MS, Bethel University
  • Meredith L. May. Instructor. History. BA, Stephen F. Austin State University; MA, PhD Texas Christian University
  • Harold L. McCutchen. Chair and Instructor. Biology. BS, MS, Angelo State University
  • Dann C. McDonald. Instructor. Mathematics. BS, United States Air Force Academy; MA, Naval War College; MS, Air Force Institute of Technology
  • Jackie L. McDonald. Instructor. Nursing Assistant. BSN, MSN, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Leslie L. Messina. Instructor and Head Women's Softball Coach. Kinesiology. BS, University of Evansville; MS, Georgia Southern University
  • Karen L. Morris. Program Director and Instructor. Education. AA, Kilgore College; BA, LeTourneau University; Med Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Rick L. Moser. Assistant Chair and Instructor. Government. BS, MS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Anna Nimz. Instructor and Head Women’s Basketball Coach. Kinesiology. BS, MS, Pittsburg State University
  • Alesha M. O’Steen. Instructor. Instrumentation and Electrical Technology. AAS, Texas State Technical College; BS, MBA, LeTourneau University;
  • Katie B. Owens. Instructor. Government. BA, Carson Newman University; MA, University of Georgia
  • Terri Peerenboom. Instructor. Associate Degree Nursing. BSN, University of Texas at Tyler; MA, Sam Houston State University
  • Meghan E. Potter. Instructor. Theatre. BA, Armstrong Atlantic State University; MFA, Indiana University
  • Kevin M. Powers. Lab Instructor. Associate Degree Nursing. BS, Physical Education and Health Education, Southwest Texas State University; BSN, University of Texas at Tyler; MA, Southwest Baptist Theological Seminary
  • Travis D. Prew. Instructor. East Texas Police Academy. BS, Sam Houston State University.
  • Dorothy M. Puckett. Instructor. Biology. BS, MZS, Auburn University
  • David Rangel. Assistant Chair and Instructor. Math. BS, MS, Stephen F. Austin State University; MS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • John L. Raulston. Instructor. Government. AA, Tyler Junior College; BS, MA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Molly S. Reavis. Program Director and Instructor. Office Professional. BBA, Lamar University; MEd, Louisiana State University
  • Julian P. Redfearn. Instructor. Management. BBA, University of Texas at Austin; MS, Louisiana State University
  • Christopher W. Reed. Instructor. Occupational Safety and Health. AAS, Kilgore College
  • Daniel R. Reigstad. Deputy Director and Instructor. East Texas Police Academy. Master Peace Officer Certificate, Advanced Instructor Certificate, Firearms Instructor Certificate, Texas Commission on Law Enforcement
  • Tina K. Rushing. Instructor. Sociology. AA, Kilgore College; BSW, Stephen F. Austin State University; MSSW, University of Texas at Arlington
  • Julia K. Schneider. Instructor. Associate Degree Nursing. ADN, Madisonville Community College; BSN, Murray State University; MSN, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Portia Y. Scott. Instructor. English. BA, MA, Texas State University
  • Donald R. Seals. Chair and Instructor. Government. BA, East Texas Baptist University; MA, Baylor University
  • Michael D. Simmons. Director. Fire Academy. Dallas Baptist University; Oklahoma City University; El Centro College; Texas A&M- Commerce
  • Nicholas B. Simpson. Instructor. Biology. BS, MS; Louisiana Tech University;
  • J. Wade Skinner. Instructor. English. BA, University of North Texas; MA, Westminster Theological; ME, University of Dallas
  • Michael D. Smith. Instructor. Emergency Medical Technology. EMT - Paramedic. AAS, Kilgore College; BAAS, MS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Joyce A. Sperlich. Instructor. Cosmetology. Advanced Beauty College of Tucson; Pima County College
  • Rachel D. Stallard. Instructor and Flare/Yearbook Adviser. Journalism. AA, Kilgore College; BA, MA, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Jeffrey M. Stanglin. Instructor. Government. BA, Abilene Christian University; MA, University of Texas at Arlington; J.D., Cooley Law School
  • Ingo R. Stoehr. Instructor. English. Equiv. MA, Johannes Gutenberg University; Equiv. MTA, Studienseminar Bensheim; PhD, University of Texas at Austin
  • Melanie J. Sullivan. Instructor, Music/Theory. AA, Kilgore College; BM, University of Texas at Tyler; MM, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Jeanine G. Tagg. Chair and Instructor. Speech. BFA, University of Mississippi; MA, University of Alabama
  • Traci L. Thompson. Instructor. Office Professional. BS, Southwest Missouri State University; MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Ann K. Thrower. Instructor. Mathematics. BS, MEd, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Cindy L. Thurman. Instructor. Police Academy. AA, Lon Morris College; BS, University of Houston; MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Lori D. Truman. Instructor. English. AA, Kilgore College; BA, Southwestern Assemblies of God University; MA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Nina L. Verheyden. Instructor. Mathematics. BA, University of Texas at Austin; MS, Southern Methodist University; PhD, University of Texas at Austin
  • A. Brandon Walker. Chair and Instructor. Mathematics. AA, Kilgore College; BS, University of Texas at Tyler; MS, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • Shelley D. Wayne. Instructor and Assistant Rangerette Director. Dance. Southwest Texas State University; MEd, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Glenn E. Wells. Instructor and Band Director. Music. AA, Kilgore College; BFA, MA, MEd, Stephen F. Austin State University
  • John A. Whitehead. Instructor. Legal Assisting. AA, Kilgore College; BA, JD, Baylor University
  • Matthew R. Wickes. Instructor. Mathematics. BS, Abilene Christian University; MS, Tarleton State University
  • Michelle W. Wilder. Instructor. English. BA, Baylor University; MA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Debbie L. Williams. Instructor. Biology. BS, MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Justin M. Willoughby. Instructor. East Texas Police Academy. AA, Trinity Valley Community College;
  • Paul S. Wills. Instructor. Psychology. AS, Northeast Texas Community College; BS, MS, Texas A&M University- Commerce
  • Shelly P. Wood. Instructor. Mathematics. AA, Kilgore College; BS, Texas A&M University; MS, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Tami L. Yates. Instructor. Vocational Nursing. AAS, AS, Kilgore College; BSN, MSN, University of Texas at Arlington; MBA, University of Texas at Tyler
  • Susan W. Yellott. Instructor. Mathematics. BS, Lamar University; MS, Texas A&M University

NOTICE:

The provisions and information set forth in this catalog are intended to be informational and not contractual in nature, thus, this catalog is not intended, and shall not be construed, to constitute a contract between the Kilgore Junior College District (Kilgore College) and any student, prospective student, agency of the local, state, or federal government, or any other person or legal entity of any and every nature whatsoever. Kilgore College hereby reserves and retains the right to amend, alter, change, delete, or modify any of the provisions of this catalog at any time, and from time to time, without notice, in any manner that the administration or Board of Trustees of Kilgore College deems to be in the best interest of Kilgore College.


Campus Maps & Locations


Instructional Locations:

MAIN AND OFF-CAMPUS LOCATIONS:

  • Main Campus:  1100 Broadway  Kilgore, Texas 75662
  • Kilgore – Longview Campus   300 W. High St.   Longview, Texas 75601
  • East Texas Police Academy:  1100 Broadway    Kilgore, Texas 75662
  • Spear Training Facility: 1810 CR 174 E. Kilgore, TX 75662
  • Anderson Co. Annex: 703 N Mallard St # 103, Palestine, TX 75801 (903)723-7421
  • Anderson County SO: 1200 E Lacy St, Palestine, TX 75801 (903) 729-6068
  • Carthage PD:  321 W Panola St, Carthage, TX 75633 (903) 693-3866
  • Cherokee County SO:  272 Underwood St, Rusk, TX 75785 (903) 683-2271
  • Clarksville PD:  800 W Main St, Clarksville, TX 75426 (903) 427-3836
  • ETPA Northeast (Northeast Texas Community College):  2886 FM 1735 Mt. Pleasant, Texas 75455
  • Gilmer PD:  208 W Harrison St, Gilmer, TX 75644 (903) 843-5545
  • Gregg County SO:  101 E Methvin St #559, Longview, TX 75601 (903) 236-8400
  • Gun Barrel PD:  Municipal Dr Gun Barrel City, TX 75156 (903) 887-7151
  • Harrison County SO: 200 West Houston Marshall, Texas  75670 (903)923-4000
  • Henderson County SO: 206 N Murchison St A, Athens, TX 75751 (903) 675-5128
  • Henderson PD: 800 Lake Forest Pkwy, Henderson, TX 75652 (903) 657-3512
  • Jacksonville PD:  210 W Larissa St, Jacksonville, TX 75766 (903) 586-2546
  • Jacksonville ISD PD: 436 Southwest Loop 456, Jacksonville, TX 75766
  • Longview Fire Dept Training Center: 411 American Legion Blvd, Longview, TX 75601(903) 237-1000
  • Longview PD: 302 W Cotton St. Longview, TX 75601 (903) 237-1199
  • Marshall PD:  2101 E End Blvd N, Marshall, TX 75670 (903) 935-4575
  • Nash PD: 119 Elm St, Nash, TX 75569 (903) 838-0822
  • Palestine Civic Center: 1819 W Spring St, Palestine, TX 75803 (903) 723-2026
  • Palestine PD:  504 N Queen St, Palestine, TX 75801 (903) 729-2254
  • Palestine PD Training Room: 2000 S. Loop 256, Suite 38
  • Panola County SO:  314 W Wellington St, Carthage, TX 75633 (903) 693-0333
  • Paris PD: 2910 Clarksville St, Paris, TX 75460 (903) 784-6688
  • Pittsburg PD: 26 Church St, Pittsburg, TX 75686 (903) 856-3330
  • Quitman PD: 401 E Goode St, Quitman, TX 75783 (903) 763-4410
  • Smith County SO: 227 N Spring Ave, Tyler, TX 75702 (903) 590-2661
  • Texarkana PD Training Center: 100 N. State Line Ave. #16 Texarkana, TX 75501-5666 (903)798-3116
  • Upshur County SO:  405 Titus St Ste. 6 Gilmer, TX 75644 (903) 843-2541
  • Van Zandt County: SO 121 E. Dallas St., Room 202. Canton TX, 75103 (903)567-7555
  • Carlisle High School: 8960 F M 13, Price, TX 75687
  • Gilmer High School: 850 Buffalo St, Gilmer, TX 75644
  • Gladewater High School: 2201 W Gay Ave, Gladewater, TX 75647
  • Hallsville High School: 616 Cal Young Rd, Hallsville, TX 75650
  • Harleton High School: 17000 State Highway 154, Harleton, TX 75651
  • Henderson High School: 1900 Hwy 64, Henderson, TX 75653
  • Kilgore High School: 711 N Longview St, Kilgore, TX 75662
  • Laneville High School: 7415 Hwy 1798 W, Laneville, TX 75667
  • Leveretts Chapel High School: 8956 State Highway 42 N # 135, Overton, TX 75684
  • Longview High School: 201 E Tomlinson Pkwy, Longview, TX 75605
  • Mount Enterprise High School: 301 NW 3rd Street, Mount Enterprise, TX 75681
  • New Diana High School: 11826 State Highway 154 E, Diana, TX 75640
  • Overton High School: 111 E McKay St, Overton, TX 75684
  • Pine Tree High School: 1005 W Fairmont St, Longview, TX 75604
  • Sabine High School: 5424 Fm 1252 W, Gladewater, TX 75647
  • Springhill High School: 2800 E George Richey, Longview, TX 75605
  • Tatum High School: 600 Crystal Farms Rd, Tatum, TX 75691
  • Union Grove High School: 11220 Union Grove Rd. Gladewater, Texas 75647
  • West Rusk High School: 10705 S. Main New London, TX 75682
  • White Oak High School: 200 S White Oak Rd, White Oak, TX 75693

STATEMENT OF NON-DISCRIMINATION:

Kilgore College is an equal opportunity and affirmative action institution and does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, age, national origin, disability, veteran's status or genetic information in its educational programs, employment policies or activities.

Kilgore College is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.


View the 2018-19 version of the Kilgore College Catalog (pdf)